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Download The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century eBook

by Tony Hillerman

Download The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century eBook
ISBN:
0618065954
Author:
Tony Hillerman
Language:
English
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Co.; 1st edition (2000)
Pages:
813 pages
EPUB book:
1960 kb
FB2 book:
1208 kb
DJVU:
1624 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
290


Personally, I enjoyed Penzler's 100 Best Noir Stories of the Century a lot more

In THE BEST AMERICAN MYSTERY STORIES OF THE CENTURY, best-selling author Tony Hillerman and mystery expert Otto Penzler present an unparalleled treasury of American suspense fiction that every fan will cherish. Offering the finest examples from all reaches of the genre. Personally, I enjoyed Penzler's 100 Best Noir Stories of the Century a lot more. That book had good/great short stories, too, but they matched the title description a lot better than this volume.

In THE BEST AMERICAN MYSTERY STORIES OF THE CENTURY, best-selling author Tony Hillerman and mystery expert Otto Penzler present an unparalleled treasury of American suspense fiction that every fan will cherish.

In his introduction, Hillerman confides that he'd have included many more stories from the pulps and the slick magazines if Penzler hadn't wisely deterred him. For his part, Penzler takes on all who dissent from the choices with a puckish . . For his part, Penzler takes on all who dissent from the choices with a puckish disclaimer, "If you don't, it's only because Tony left out the stories that you'd have wanted to see included

In this book, best-selling author Tony Hillerman and mystery expert Otto Penzler present an unparalleled treasury of American suspense fiction that every fan will cherish.

In this book, best-selling author Tony Hillerman and mystery expert Otto Penzler present an unparalleled treasury of American suspense fiction that every fan will cherish. Offering the finest examples from all reaches of the genre, this collection charts the mystery's eminent history from the turn-of-the-century puzzles of Futrelle, to the seminal pulp fiction of Hammett and Chandler, to the mystery story's rise to legitimacy in the popular mind, a trend that has benefited masterly writers like Westlake, Hunter, and Grafton.

The Best American Series ®. Publisher. Mystery buffs and newcomers alike will delight in the thrilling stories and top-notch writing of a hundred years' worth of the finest suspense, crime, and mystery writing. The Best American Series ®.

Sue DeNymme has a rich bloodline of storytellers, embellishers, and exaggerators, including fishermen, pirates, and royalty

Sue DeNymme has a rich bloodline of storytellers, embellishers, and exaggerators, including fishermen, pirates, and royalty. When she began writing, she immediately won a poetry prize. Now that she has decided to write the tallest possible tales, she chose mystery fiction for her career

Other Distinguished Mystery Stories of 2016. I can think of no other substantive changes, which I regard as a good thing

Other Distinguished Mystery Stories of 2016. I can think of no other substantive changes, which I regard as a good thing.

Mysteries Stories of the Century, compiled by Tony Hillerman and Otto Penzler, is a remarkably good anthology. Regardless of whether you agree with the choices of all the stories selected within this book, it is a great representation of american mystery stories in the 20th century.

The Best American Mysteries Stories of the Century, compiled by Tony Hillerman and Otto Penzler, is a remarkably good anthology. Some years are skipped while others have two or three offerings. They did limit their choices to only one story for a given author, perhaps unfairly penalizing exceptional writers like Raymond Chandler, James M. Cain, Harry Kemelman, Ellery Queen, John McDonald, and Ross McDonald.

Tony Hillerman's many honors include the Mystery Writers of America's Edgar and Grandmaster prizes, the . By commissioning new stories from the best mystery writers on both sides of the Atlantic, and reprinting classic (though frequently forgotten) fiction, the magazine flourished.

Tony Hillerman's many honors include the Mystery Writers of America's Edgar and Grandmaster prizes, the Silver Spur Award for best novel set in the West, and the Navajo Tribe's Special Friend Award. It is a tribute to Frederic Dannay, one half of the writing team of Ellery Queen, that he devoted so much time and energy to the risky vennture.

  • inform
I don't envy anyone tasked with assembling a book like this. You'd want to be original, but you couldn't skip the best things. You'd need to hit many of the major figures while not ignoring minor gems. You'd want to hit every flavor and node.

Hillerman and Penzler did a fine job, selecting many moving and startling stories for the collection. Several made me laugh, some made me shiver, some stayed with me for days. At the same time, some seem out of place for tone, others for content. Rather than discuss every story (there are 46, after all), I'll list my five favorite and the five most out of place.

Let's start with the out-of-place ones:

- "The Comforts of Home" - Flannery O'Connor is a stark story, but isn't strictly a mystery, nor is it pleasant
- "Do with Me What You Will" by Joyce Carol Oates feels too ham-handed-- a story about something instead of being a story that makes you think about something
- "First Offense" by Evan Hunter has the same problem -- it's too "on the nose"
- "An Error in Chemistry" by William Faulkner - tries to be a clever mystery but falls flat. It's also written in a confusing way, revealing details in the wrong order.
- "Paul's Case" by Willa Cather feels like a rambling story that isn't really a mystery at all.

The five best stories. I'd like to be clear -- there are many great stories in this collection. I'd have no trouble assembling a list of 10 instead of five. But five will do:

- "The Dark Snow" by Brendan DuBois seethes with the daily torments of modern life, and challenges the reader to rethink easy dichotomies of good and evil.
- "The Terrapin" by Patricia Highsmith is perhaps the most horrifying story of the book, followed in a close second by Harlan Ellison's "The Whimper of Whipped Dogs."
- "The Catbird Seat" by James Thurber still holds as one of my favorite stories ever. A tale of petty bureaucracy and orderliness.
- "A Jury of her Peers" by Susan Glaspell brings the early 20th century feminism into bright relief, and works wonderfully.
- "The Moment of Decision" by Stanley Ellin prods our conscience, asking how we'd act if a harrowing moment presented itself.

Overall, a very good read. The anthology takes a pretty broad view of what a "mystery" is, but it can be forgiving since this broad definition yielded so many gems.
  • Brajind
The stories are generally good, but I'm knocking off a star because many or most of them are not "mystery" stories, which is what I expected based on the title. If you're looking for some good short stories by good authors, you will likely enjoy the book. Personally, I enjoyed Penzler's 100 Best Noir Stories of the Century a lot more. That book had good/great short stories, too, but they matched the title description a lot better than this volume. Take the word "mystery" out of the title and I'll add a star.
  • Zeus Wooden
Editors are always a little presumptuous when they use a title starting with "The Best..." The editor of this volume has selected 46 American authors from the 20th century, and included one story by each author. He has included some well known novelists like Faulkner, who were not known for writing short stories or mysteries; and excluded some well known mystery writers who are known for writing short stories, e.g., Marcia Muller, Lawrence Sanders, Michael Collins, etc.

Some of the stories are crime stories rather than mysteries, i.e., you know who pulled the trigger. It is a good collection of stories (in spite of omissions) starting with O. Henry's "A Retrieved Reformation," originally published in 1903, and ending with Dennis Lehane's "Running Out of Dog," originally published in 1999. In Between there are stories by Dashiell Hammett, Ring Lardner, John Steinbeck, Damon Runyon, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner, Ellery Queen, John D. MacDonald, Ross MacDonald, Joyce Carol Oates, Stephen King, Sue Grafton, and many other writers. The short stories can be read in any order, starting with your favorite authors, and can be read at leisure. It includes stories like Cornell Woolrich's "Rear Window," later made into a motion picture.

Many of the authors included are best known as novelists. It is necessary to track down their short stories in order to have a complete collection of their work, and that can be difficult as many magazines have gone out of existance, and the stories may or may not be included in anthologies.

The collection is a bargain buy with 800 pages of stories. There are short biographical sketches of the authors at the end of the volume. Many of them died young. Jacques Futrelle went down with the Titanic, staying behind after helping women and children into the lifeboats.

Most modern authors do not write many short stories. As one author noted, it takes a significant amount of time and intellectual energy to write a good story, and there is very little financial return. Consequently, it is a rare find when you encounter a short story by an established author.
  • Hasirri
This is the required book for a class I am taking in Chicago. We enjoy reading the stories and discussing them. I find that so many stories makes the book a bit bulky. We have like many of the stories. Some are definately "period pieces", but that is the point. Tony Hillerman is the editor, and he did a good job.
  • VizoRRR
Mystery always had a significant share of successful women authors and this collection fails noticeably in including them. Some early stories are truly products of their time and place and I found them more interesting in that respect than entertaining. Then of course, there's a Raymond Chandler story and no book with a Raymond Chandler story can ever dip below three stars.
  • Lcena
For the most part the stories are very interesting and entertaining. There are many authors, so some are great reads and others are just okay, but overall a very good collection. I don't think they are all really mystery stories per say, but our reading group has enjoyed nearly all of the stories.