almediah.fr
» » In the Company of Liars

Download In the Company of Liars eBook

by David Ellis

Download In the Company of Liars eBook
ISBN:
0399152474
Author:
David Ellis
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Putnam Adult (April 7, 2005)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1796 kb
FB2 book:
1251 kb
DJVU:
1736 kb
Other formats
lrf rtf mbr txt
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
323


This book may not be reproduced in whole or part, by mimeograph or any other means, without permission. Titles by david ellis. In the Company of Liars. Jury of One. Life Sentence.

This book may not be reproduced in whole or part, by mimeograph or any other means, without permission.

Doctor Lomas, she knows, is a broken man, nothing like the proud figure she has seen in the company brochures. She stifles the instinct to think of him as a victim, though a victim, in many ways, is precisely what he is. It is hard to look at this man, barefoot in boxer shorts and a rumpled white T-shirt with stained armpits, with flyaway hair and an emaciated frame, and see the promising scientist he once was. The doctor is crying uncontrollably, his chest heaving and tears flowing. Part of her job is seeing the worst in people, watching them feel, firsthand, the collapse of their lives.

In the Company of Liars. For Jennifer, Jim, Jenna, and Ryan Taylor. She hears the man running through the house, his bare feet slapping across the hardwood floor. Back bedroom, she is told via her earpiece by a member of the team at the rear of the house, looking through the kitchen window, blocking an escape route. They flood in behind her, a team of eight agents, but she is first down the hallway. Her back against the wall, both hands on the Glock at her side, she shuffles up to the bedroom door and listens. Over the sound of her team’s shoes on the hardwood, she can hear sobbing. She reaches across the width of the door and tries the knob.

This book absolutely BLEW MY MIND

This book absolutely BLEW MY MIND. Extremely well-written, a fantastic read for anyone who appreciates a good crime novel.

And why do you think it was so successful? he asks. Allison looks over Larry’s head at the shoppers in the grocery store. A character with warts, bumps, flaws, just like any other person. Yet, April wasn’t threatening to men, I don’t think. They liked her, too. She was funny. She didn’t mind having a door opened for her. I liked her. I loved that book.

A daughter and an ex-husband need to save their own skins. And circling them all, a group who would prefer to kill her quietly and anonymously, but who also are not what they seem. Our first picture of Allison is in the moments after her death

A daughter and an ex-husband need to save their own skins. Our first picture of Allison is in the moments after her death. Then the story moves backward in time like the acclaimed film Memento: an hour before, then a day, back and back until we're at the beginning and can see what's really happened and most shocking, what has not. At every turn, Allison knows what she sees may not be what's real

David Ellis’s previous novels include In the Company of Liars, Jury of One, Life Sentence, and Line of Vision, for . Now mind you - I bought this because I liked 2 other books by David Ellis so much.

David Ellis’s previous novels include In the Company of Liars, Jury of One, Life Sentence, and Line of Vision, for which he won an Edgar Award. An attorney from Chicago, he serves as Counsel to the Speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives. But this book starts off near the end of the story (a common thing, and one I don't generally object to), but then rather than reverting to the beginning of the story in the next chapter, each chapter steps back a day or two. Every chapter.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader.

A thriller told in reverse centers on a woman who is undergoing a murder trial that is being overseen by a prosecutor who is strongly pursuing a death penalty and an FBI agent who would force the defendant to betray her family. By the Edgar Award-winning author of Line of Vision. 50,000 first printing.
  • Yozshujinn
This book is very hard to describe, much less evaluate. In essence, it is a legal thriller involving murder, terrorists, government intrigue, FBI operations, and courtroom drama. But Mr Ellis decided to tell the tale in a unique manner: backwards. He begins the book at the end of the story and every scene in the entire novel takes place one or two days before what you just read. Now, I am normally not a person who goes in for gimmics. Too often authors like to prove how smart they are by fooling the reader with a gimmic of some kind. However, I had high hopes for this one (I knew about the backwards thing before I ever began to read) because of the author's first published novel, "Line of Vision", which is one of the finest legal thrillers I've ever read.

I really struggled through the first third of this book. Most stories build up the plot and develop the characters in a logical progression, allowing the reader to absorb each new element one at a time. But here, since we are starting at the end, we have to see how all of the characters end up. We read about a suicide by a character but have no idea at the time who she is and why we should care. It's confusing to say the least. And to add to the confusion, the author frequently uses flashbacks of what the character is thinking...thoughts from their past...which we will read about in upcoming chapters...wow.

But then, suprisingly, it started to jell. But the time I was half way through the book, I knew who the main players were and what their motivations were. Now I wanted to know how events got to be the way they were. I'm sure that's how the author was approaching the whole book. The ending (beginning?) was quite good and went a long way in overcoming my initial objections to the "gimmic." I will admit to going back and re-reading the first 20-30 pages to see those events from the different perspective of knowing the whole story. That provided good closure for me. I would definitely classify this work as "smart" fiction, as the writing itself is well done, and obviously every aspect of the plot is well engineered. Overall, I am both happy to have read it and glad that it is behind me. I give the first half of the book 3 stars and the last half 5 stars...rounding out to 4.
  • Garne
I was impressed by this technique in the movie Momento which was about as compelling as a movie can be. I found it a little harder to follow this in novel form as I had to keep reminding myself of all that wasn't yet known or was known. Like someone else said I hope Mr. Ellis got this difficult feat (which he did well with) out of his system. I'm now inspired to read some of his 'regular' work - I'm sure he's more than capable of writing plots that are just as ultimately satisfying as In The Company of Liars was.
  • DireRaven
I generally don't like stories written backwards chronologically, but this was the last David Ellis book that I hadn't read, so I had to try it. About half way through I could see the wisdom of writing it in this fashion. I think in the hands of a lesser author, it wouldn't have worked, but it is very well written and developed. It's an intriguing story with many surprises as you move forward - really backward - that keeps the tension level high throughout the entire book. There were a couple of questions I had at the end (which would be the beginning of the book but the end of reading it) that I would have preferred were made clearer. I felt like I needed to find someone who had read it to discuss it with. But, as with all of Ellis' books, I was always interested and very glad I read it.
  • Tojahn
This might quite literally be the most annoying book I've ever read. Now mind you - I bought this because I liked 2 other books by David Ellis so much. But this book starts off near the end of the story (a common thing, and one I don't generally object to), but then rather than reverting to the beginning of the story in the next chapter, each chapter steps back a day or two.
Every chapter.
For the whole book.
It's like reading a normal book starting with the last chapter, and moving on through to the beginning.

Now - some might say "it's a literary device!". "It's artistic!". "What? You can't follow a story in reverse you cretin?"

And to them I say: There's a reason that in the entire course of human history - most stories are told beginning to end. I'm not ashamed to tell you that this book makes my head hurt. Trying to decipher in each chapter what character has done what, knows what and will know what - in what order, is making me insane. I'm about 60% through the book, and am most likely going to just stop.

Because the other two David Ellis books I've read were so good - I will try another one - but avoid this one like the plague. Or go buy yourself some aspirin first...

Update 6/8/12: I feel like I gotta give this author some credit; while I stand by my original review of this particular book - I have since read 3 others by Mr. Ellis - and have thoroughly enjoyed them. They're interesting, I like the characters, and they tend to have unexpected endings which is awesome (I hate predictability in a book). So don't let the above review turn you off from David Ellis altogether - his other books are really great...
  • Flamehammer
This is the second of David Ellis' books that I've read and enjoyed this one as much as the first. The characters are interesting and developed so that you can identify with them. It is written in reverse order which made it challenging to read and remember from one chapter to the next. A very interesting concept. It took some concentration to keep the thread of the story going, but it was interesting enough that it was enjoyable to do so. He is one of the better writers and glad I found him.
  • Duktilar
I found this book very frustrating due to it starting at the end and going backwards to the beginning. It took me a while to get into and only started appreciating this order towards the end of the book.