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Download Snow eBook

by Orhan Pamuk

Download Snow eBook
ISBN:
0375406972
Author:
Orhan Pamuk
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Knopf (August 17, 2004)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1902 kb
FB2 book:
1193 kb
DJVU:
1166 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
711


Ever since I first read it, just after Orhan Pamuk received the Nobel Prize, it has been one A mystery.

A spellbinding tale of disparate yearnings – for love, art, power, and God. Ever since I first read it, just after Orhan Pamuk received the Nobel Prize, it has been one A mystery.

Orhan Pamuk’s Snow is a modern day look at Turkey. Once referred to as the sick man of Europe, it became a modern republic after the fall of the mighty Ottoman empire, and Kemal Ataturk, the father of modern Turkey, envisioned a secular state more aligned with western ideals of modernity, and a brand of Islam that reflected this.

Snow (Turkish: Kar) is a postmodern novel by Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk. Published in Turkish in 2002, it was translated into English by Maureen Freely and published in 2004.

Snow by Orhan Pamuk, translated by Maureen Freely 436pp, Faber, £1. 9 The book is full of winning characters, from Ka himself to Blue, a handsome Islamist terrorist with the gift of the gab, an actor-manager and his wife who tour small Anatolian. 9.

Orhan Pamuk was born in Istanbul in 1952 and grew up in a large family similar to those which he describes in his novels Cevdet Bey and His Sons and The Black Book, in the wealthy westernised district of Nisantasi. As he writes in his autobiographical book Istanbul, from his childhood until the age of 22 he devoted himself largely to painting and dreamed of becoming an artist.

Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

By Orhan Pamuk Read by John Le. Dread, yearning, identity, intrigue, the lethal chemistry between secular doubt and Islamic fanaticism–these are the elements that Orhan Pamuk anneals in this masterful, disquieting novel

By Orhan Pamuk Read by John Lee. By Orhan Pamuk Read by John Lee. Best Seller. Part of Vintage International. Dread, yearning, identity, intrigue, the lethal chemistry between secular doubt and Islamic fanaticism–these are the elements that Orhan Pamuk anneals in this masterful, disquieting novel. An exiled poet named Ka returns to Turkey and travels to the forlorn city of Kars. His ostensible purpose is to report on a wave of suicides among religious girls forbidden to wear their head-scarves.

The Black Book is a stunning tapestry of Middle Eastern and Islamic culture which confirms Orhan Pamuk's reputation s a writer of international stature, comparable to Borges and Calvino. Galip is an Istanbul lawyer, and his wife, Ruya, has vanished

The Black Book is a stunning tapestry of Middle Eastern and Islamic culture which confirms Orhan Pamuk's reputation s a writer of international stature, comparable to Borges and Calvino. Galip is an Istanbul lawyer, and his wife, Ruya, has vanished. Could she be hiding out with her half brother, Jelal, a newspaper columnist whose fame Galip envies?

This book lends a perspective on life in Turkey, something of an epiphany for me. While I do not understand or condone the mindset of Islamist thought, "Snow" gives the reader an insight into the Muslim culture. Наиболее популярные в Художественная литература.

From the acclaimed author of My Name Is Red (“a sumptuous thriller”–John Updike; “chockful of sublimity and sin”–New York Times Book Review), comes a spellbinding tale of disparate yearnings–for love, art, power, and God–set in a remote Turkish town, where stirrings of political Islamism threaten to unravel the secular order.Following years of lonely political exile in Western Europe, Ka, a middle-aged poet, returns to Istanbul to attend his mother’s funeral. Only partly recognizing this place of his cultured, middle-class youth, he is even more disoriented by news of strange events in the wider country: a wave of suicides among girls forbidden to wear their head scarves at school. An apparent thaw of his writer’s curiosity–a frozen sea these many years–leads him to Kars, a far-off town near the Russian border and the epicenter of the suicides.No sooner has he arrived, however, than we discover that Ka’s motivations are not purely journalistic; for in Kars, once a province of Ottoman and then Russian glory, now a cultural gray-zone of poverty and paralysis, there is also Ipek, a radiant friend of Ka’s youth, lately divorced, whom he has never forgotten. As a snowstorm, the fiercest in memory, descends on the town and seals it off from the modern, westernized world that has always been Ka’s frame of reference, he finds himself drawn in unexpected directions: not only headlong toward the unknowable Ipek and the desperate hope for love–or at least a wife–that she embodies, but also into the maelstrom of a military coup staged to restrain the local Islamist radicals, and even toward God, whose existence Ka has never before allowed himself to contemplate. In this surreal confluence of emotion and spectacle, Ka begins to tap his dormant creative powers, producing poem after poem in untimely, irresistible bursts of inspiration. But not until the snows have melted and the political violence has run its bloody course will Ka discover the fate of his bid to seize a last chance for happiness.Blending profound sympathy and mischievous wit, Snow illuminates the contradictions gripping the individual and collective heart in many parts of the Muslim world. But even more, by its narrative brilliance and comprehension of the needs and duties
  • Wenes
The beauty of humanity is also its tragedy; that the world is non-linear, that it is made up of pluralities of opinions and ways of life; this should challenge the inhabitants to strive for peaceful co-existence, even in the face of conflicting attitudes and beliefs. This philosophy accommodates and respects views that differ. This is the ideal that should inform and guide whatever we do.

Orhan Pamuk’s Snow is a modern day look at Turkey. Once referred to as the sick man of Europe, it became a modern republic after the fall of the mighty Ottoman empire, and Kemal Ataturk, the father of modern Turkey, envisioned a secular state more aligned with western ideals of modernity, and a brand of Islam that reflected this. Although it appears to expose some of the cruelties inflicted on religious conservatives by military, in a bid to promote modernity by any means, it is a story of a country coming terms with inevitable change in an evolving world, navigating its way through the parchments of culture, religion and external influences. It is also a story about the poet Ka, and his love for an old classmate, Ipek. It is about a love that never fully reaches its zenith, one that is negotiated in hotel rooms where the lovers bide tryst, whilst snow gently falls on the city of Kars. It is a love that is jealous and forgiving, cold and at other times burning with zeal, its Manichean temperament a reflection of Turkey itself, a land of paradoxes, beauties and mysteries.

Ka’s search for truth, his sojourn into Kars, south of Istanbul, to investigate the suicide of several Muslim girls forced to remove their headscarves by law, leads him to witness the brutality of a military regime, whose charge to uphold secularism is ironically upheld by anti-democratic means. Is it possible that those who hold secular views and those with more conservative, religious reviews can co-exist peacefully in the same space? Parmuk does not answer this question. He gives us what he sees, and lets us draw our own inferences. In fact, one need only look at Egypt, where a democratically elected government, though conservatively religious, was voted in but subsequently removed by the army, to the tacit (and even overt) approval of secularists and those of other faiths. Was this right? Should the army have stood by while the Islamists, who were democratically elected, govern Egypt how they saw fit, even if this went against accepted Western archetypes of democracy? This is captured quite succinctly by Blue, a colourful character, suspected terrorist and die-hard conservative, whose amorous affairs sit so comfortably with his religious conviction:

Will the West, which takes democracy, its greatest invention, more seriously than the word of God, come out against this coup that has brought an end to democracy in Kars? …
Can the West endure any democracy achieved by an enemy who in no way resemble them? (Page 241)

Pamuk’s Snow is ultimately a story of not just Turkey; it is a story of all of us -human, flawed, imperfect; some seeking to change things; others pining for things to remain as they are. Dialogue then becomes the essence of co-habitation, in this space of pluralities, where words differ, where appearances matter, and certain proclivities push the boundaries of what many see as logical and natural. As Derek Walcott put it, “the war between obsession and responsibility will never finish”.
  • Shalinrad
Snow began as a very interesting novel that felt reminiscent of Kafka's The Castle. It had my attention for more than half. Surrounded always by falling snow, the poet Ka wanders alone to the ancient city of Kars. Political intrigue abounds, and religious worries. The settings are humble tea shops and dilapidated houses. There is a beautiful hotel keeper for Ka to fall in love with, a newspaperman who publishes stories of events still in the future, terrorists of several stripes, as well as many other interesting and surprising characters. The reader becomes immersed in a compelling dream of a remote and troubled land. Then comes the appearance of Sunay Zaim and his theatrical coup d'etat. This is what broke the spell for me. It allowed a sort of cartoon element in. The novelist from that point forward seemed to be working very hard to tie up his many plot lines and several late chapters were reduced to soap opera. I have to say I loved the first half but was badly let down by the second.
  • Quphagie
A slow read. I was taking a college course on Turkey, and our instructor highly recommended the book, so I ordered it. But after something like 200+ pages not only 24 hours had passed and it was always snowing, and I just found it boring, in spite of the many "insights" it may have offered into Turkey , particularly eastern Turkey. But I admit that many others really loved the book.
  • zmejka
I've been reading this book for maybe a year now. I cannot pick it up, but I cannot put it down. My friend LOVED it, and I am trying. I will say that it stays with me, and I can leave it for weeks and come back to it and fall right back into it. The writing is superb, I really do enjoy that. The part that I can't get through is how peaceful it is about any of the activity, it does not grab me. I say that but I do wonder what will come of it. So I pick it up here and there, thoroughly enjoy the writing and wonder if I am reading the words correctly because there seems to be a fair amount of activity, significant activity, but the author and main character are very serene about it.

I guess you can say I cannot wait to finish it. Maybe next year.
  • Levion
Orhan Pamuk is a great author, At times this novel reminded me of some of the great Russian novelists. The author creates great scenes where the snowy landscape itself almost is it's own character. You can feel the isolation and dreariness of this small Turkish town. It is a great insight into Islam both from an Atheists perspective and a theists perspective. The characters are all well developed and interesting. I don't usually go for poetry but the main characters poems are interesting and blend well with the story.
  • Natety
What really strikes me about Pamuk's writing, apart from beautiful language which makes things tangible, apart from existential deepness, apart from almost documentary picture he creates of the places his novels are set in, is the way he combines, mixes, interwines it all into one thick and colorful tissue: history, politics, psychology, philosophy, religion, love story. He absolutely stands alone