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by Lawrence Sanders

Download The Eighth Commandment eBook
ISBN:
0450404811
Author:
Lawrence Sanders
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
No Imprint; New Ed edition (1987)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1787 kb
FB2 book:
1102 kb
DJVU:
1676 kb
Other formats
docx lrf lit mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
706


Lawrence Sanders (1920–1998) was the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty mystery and suspense novels. The Anderson Tapes, completed when he was fifty years old, received an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for best first novel.

Lawrence Sanders (1920–1998) was the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty mystery and suspense novels. His prodigious oeuvre encompasses the Edward X. Delaney, Archy McNally, and Timothy Cone series, along with his acclaimed Commandment books. Stand-alone novels include Sullivan's Sting and Caper. Sanders remains one of America’s most popular novelists, with more than fifty million copies of his books in print.

Lawrence Sanders (March 15, 1920 – February 7, 1998) was an American novelist and short story writer. Lawrence Sanders was born in Brooklyn in New York City. After public school he attended Wabash College, where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree. He then returned to New York and worked at Macy's Department Store. In 1943 he joined the United States Marine Corps and was discharged in 1946.

The Eighth Commandment book. Lawrence Sanders was the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty mystery and suspense novels

The Eighth Commandment book. Lawrence Sanders was the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty mystery and suspense novels. Delaney, Archy McNally, and Timothy Cone series, along with There is more than one author with this name.

Электронная книга "The Eighth Commandment", Lawrence Sanders. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Eighth Commandment" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Eighth Commandment. When a rare coin vanishes, an appraiser tries to clear her name-and exposes one family’s lethal secrets.

Enoch Wottle said apologetically, calling from Arizona. What I found out about Archibald Havistock’s finances you could put in your eye and it wouldn’t hurt a bi. .I know you tried, and I appreciate i.They had no trouble with him whatsoever. So they saw no reason to investigate again. Of course not, I said. Why should they? Enoch, thank you again for your help. I couldn’t have done it without you.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The Eighth Commandment. Thou shalt not steal is indeed the moral in this light-as-a-bubble comic caper by the New York Times–bestselling author (People). Appraising rare coins for Grandby & Sons, a venerable Madison Avenue auction house, is a dream come true for Mary Lou Bateson. She even gets a chance to inspect the Havistock Collection of priceless coins, which includes the Demaretion, a rare, ancient Greek silver piece.

LATE NOVEMBER, AND THE world was dying. A wild wind hooted faintly outside the windows.

The sixth commandment, . The Sixth Commandment, . part of The Commandment Series. LATE NOVEMBER, AND THE world was dying. by. Sanders, Lawrence, 1920-1998. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The Eighth Commandment MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged

The Eighth Commandment MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. Lawrence Sanders (Author). It's not a bad book, but for a guy who penned some of the best page-turners of the 70s and 80s, "not bad" is not good enough. T8C is the story of a coin appraiser named Mary Lou Bateson ("Dunk" to her friends, because at 6'2" she's tall enough to go to the bucket), who becomes embroiled in numismatic version of locked-door mystery.

Clean pages. Minor wear on edge of spine.
  • greatest
I am loathe to give a Lawrence Sanders book a mediocre review, but the truth is that THE EIGHTH COMMANDMENT just doesn't meet the standard set by this prolific and gifted author during his best years. It's not a bad book, but for a guy who penned some of the best page-turners of the 70s and 80s, "not bad" is not good enough.

T8C is the story of a coin appraiser named Mary Lou Bateson ("Dunk" to her friends, because at 6'2" she's tall enough to go to the bucket), who becomes embroiled in numismatic version of locked-door mystery. A priceless coin entrusted to her care by the very rich, very troubled Havistock family disappears despite every security precaution, and largely to protect herself against suspicion she made off it with herself, she plays at amateur detective. This brings her into contact not only with the extended (and twisted) Havistock clan, but with two detectives who, already professional rivals, become rivals for her affection as well. Juggling the attentions of suave insurance investigator Jack Smack and the rumpled but loveable NYPD detective Al Gorgio, Dunk discovers she has a talent for detection herself, but her lack of experience (and frankly, common sense) puts her at risk of losing much more than her job, when her questions begin to annoy the wrong people.

To be sure, THE EIGHTH COMMANDMENT has some things going for it. Lawrence Sanders, even when he was clearly uninterested in his story and probably racing to make a deadline, was one of the most gifted prose-writers of his or any other generation, with a special gift for turns of phrase, descriptions, and atmosphere, and he had a talent for making even his stock characters memorable (Al Georgio is as vivid in my mind's eye as if he were sitting next to me at this moment.) His preoccupation with food, drink, architecture, furniture, and objets d'art makes for sumptuous reading. An experienced mystery writer, he knows how to chuck out red herrings and drop hints that may or may not pan out. And he knows how to convey the sometimes frightening loneliness a person can feel living in the Big Apple alone.

Unfortunately, all of this is simply what I expect from the guy who wrote the DEADLY SIN series, THE ANDERSON TAPES, and such compulsively re-readable books as THE SIXTH COMMANDMENT. Maybe I'm judging him unfairly, but this book lacks that special something Sanders usually brings to the table. The first problem lies in the "a toi", the three-way romance between Dunk, Jack Slack, and Al Georgio. Having gone out of his way to tell us that Dunk (who narrates the story), is not only awkwardly tall, but plain of face and body, he then puts two extremely desirable men dueling for her affection. The reader naturally assumes one or both of them is using her to get information about the missing coin, but no, they really want her. This feels artificial, and so does Sanders' choice to give almost everyone in the book a preposterous name. Why he chose to do that I don't know -- maybe to add a comedic element, but it simply forces the reader out of suspension of disbelief and reminds him/her that he/she is reading a potboiler.
Sanders gift for character generation is largely absent from this book, and with the exception of Georgio and Archibald Havistock, most of the characters feel like stock right out of Central Casting. What's more, Dunk seems astonishingly dumb about her own safety and to top it off, the entire book turns on an utterly unbelievable decision she makes regarding a package entrusted to her by a character who is subsequently murdered. I just didn't believe Dunk would refuse to open it, and possibly solve the mystery (and save her own bacon), just because she promised the now-dead giver she wouldn't. It's a problem for the heroine that feels utterly contrived and forced. Finally, the book's ending, while probably realistic, is a total downer and not in keeping with the more-lighthearted-than-usual tone of this mystery.

Do not mistake me. I love Lawrence Sanders and would never bash him. But to say this book "OK" and nothing more is pretty much just calling it like I read it. Hard-core fans will of course want to give it a try, but those new to Sanders' work should pick something else in his repertoire.
  • Skiletus
My Kindle copy of The Eighth Commandment is actually The Seventh Commandment with an Eighth Commandment cover on it. Boo for the Kindle edition!

As far as the actual book, this isn't my favorite Sanders, but my least favorite is still better than a lot of other books. Nobody was better at creating and tying together multiple complex plot threads involving bizarre but totally credible characters. I love all four of the Commandment books--they hold up remarkably well--but Ten and Six are simply brilliant. Seven and Eight are merely very good.
  • Micelhorav
I read most of Lawrence Sanders' mysteries when I was in high school and found them delightful. Now they are still fun, but, maybe because I have aged or my life experience has broadened, I recognize the stereotypes and the well trod plot lines. Still he hits all of the important beats and moves the story along briskly with a couple of clever twists.
  • Alianyau
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, counting it as one of Mr. Sanders’ best. His “Commandment” series is, in my opinion, his best, even better than McNally. Dunk is my second favorite character, bested only by Joshua Bigg.
  • Fawrindhga
no comment
  • Samugul
LOVE IT
  • I'm a Russian Occupant
I have read most of Lawrence Sander's books and enjoyed them all (except for The Marlowe Chronicles). The Eighth Commandment is a little different and a welcome deviation from his other New York detective and Archie McNally themed books. Also, if you are a Sue Grafton fan and have read all of her's and looking for something similar, try this one.
Great