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Download The Dying Breed eBook

by Declan Hughes (author)

Download The Dying Breed eBook
ISBN:
0719567505
Author:
Declan Hughes (author)
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
John Murray (April 2, 2009)
EPUB book:
1153 kb
FB2 book:
1588 kb
DJVU:
1729 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
560


The Dying Breed An Irish Novel of Suspense Declan Hughes To Alan Glynn Contents Part I Advent One Three weeks . Regina ran to Miranda and fell to her knees an. bout the Author. Other Books by Declan Hughes.

The Dying Breed An Irish Novel of Suspense Declan Hughes To Alan Glynn Contents Part I Advent One Three weeks before Christmas, Father Vincent Tyrell asked Tommy. Depend on the rabbit’s foot if you like

The Dying Breed book. Ed Loy, a private investigator, is asked In a recent interview, Irish author Declan Hughes talks about his Ed Loy mystery series. The books, he says, are family gothic

The Dying Breed book. What's in a name? Apparently everything for Ed Loy, because that's. The books, he says, are family gothic. Despite the impression Irish people give that we're open and friendly and candid, there's a lot we don't want to tell you - a lot of skeletons in our closets.

The Dying Breed Audible Audiobook – Unabridged In a recent interview, Irish author Declan Hughes talks about his Ed Loy mystery series. The books, he says, are family gothic

The Dying Breed Audible Audiobook – Unabridged. Declan Hughes (Author), Stanley Townsend (Narrator), ISIS Audio Books (Publisher) & 0 more. In a recent interview, Irish author Declan Hughes talks about his Ed Loy mystery series. In this third Ed Loy P. I. novel, Hughes relates a family saga full of family blood, betrayal, and secrets. Keeping the secrets is THE PRICE OF BLOOD.

Author Declan Hughes. Declan Hughes The Dying Breed. The Wrong Kind of Blood (Ed Loy PI). Declan Hughes. Dublin PI Ed Loy tackles a case that takes him back to Los Angeles - his home of twenty years - and a past he'd rather forget in this gripping new novel in the Edgar Award-nominated and Shamus Award-winning series. Ed Loy has laid his ghosts to rest. What's in a name? Apparently everything for Ed Loy, because that's the only information Father Vincent Tyrrell, brother of prominent racehorse trainer F. X. Tyrrell, offers when he asks for Ed's help in finding a missing person.

Declan Hughes is the author of the Ed Loy PI series: The Wrong Kind of Blood; The Colour of Blood; The Price of Blood/The Dying Breed; All The Dead Voices and City of Lost Girls

Declan Hughes is the author of the Ed Loy PI series: The Wrong Kind of Blood; The Colour of Blood; The Price of Blood/The Dying Breed; All The Dead Voices and City of Lost Girls. His books have been nominated for the Edgar, CWA New Blood Dagger, Shamus, Macavity and Theakston's Old Peculier awards. The Wrong Kind of Blood won the Shamus for Best First PI Novel, and, in France, the Le Point Magazine prize for best foreign crime novel. Declan is also an award-winning playwright, and the co-founder and former artistic director of Dublin's Rough Magic Theatre Company.

Books related to The Dying Breed. More by Declan Hughes. Say what you liked best and least. Describe the author's style. Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price. 0) 50 characters minimum.

Declan Hughes (born 1963) is an Irish novelist, playwright and screenwriter. He has been n with the Abbey Theatre in Dublin and Irish Writer Fellow at Trinity College, Dublin. He has written a series of crime novels featuring the Irish-American detective Ed Loy. The name "Loy" is a homage to the character Sam Spade from The Maltese Falcon: a loy is a traditional Irish spade.

The Bloomsday Dead by Adrian McKinty. The Detainees by Sean Hughes. Quite Ugly One Morning by Christopher Brookmyre.

The well-written, deceptively wry narration of the detective hero lends a light note to a very dark plot of malice and corruption in Dublin's horse-racing world. A word of warning for those of nervous disposition: this is a no-holds-barred expose of Irish high society clashing with low-life in a bloody tale of murder, incest, drug-dealing, sadistic priests and child abuse, culminating in an unholy mayhem of Greek tragedy proportions. The Bloomsday Dead by Adrian McKinty.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Declan Hughes books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 30 of 69 results.

320pp, John Murray, £1. 9. One reason for the recent increase in Irish crime fiction may be the increase in Irish crime. Another may be the successful ceasefire in Northern Ireland; the killings of the previous decades having made guns, for the duration, a lot less fun. But a boomtown loves crime fiction, especially hard-boiled crime fiction. Declan Hughes's Dublin recalls Hammett's San Francisco and Chandler's 1940s LA - hot money towns in which the social wax was not yet set.

Even the best private eye needs more than a name to find a missing person, but that's all that Father Vincent Tyrrell, the brother of prominent racehorse trainer F. X. Tyrrell, will offer Loy when he comes to him for help. A dwindling bank account convinces Loy to delve into the deadly underworld of horse racing, but fortune soon smiles on him: while working another case, he discovers a phone number linked to F. X. on a badly beaten body left at an illegal dump. Loy's been around long enough to know that there's more to the Tyrrell family than meets the eye - and then a third body appears...
  • Fearlesshunter
In a recent interview, Irish author Declan Hughes talks about his Ed Loy mystery series. The books, he says, are family gothic. "Despite the impression Irish people give that we're open and friendly and candid, there's a lot we don't want to tell you -- a lot of skeletons in our closets."

In this third Ed Loy P. I. novel, Hughes relates a family saga full of family blood, betrayal, and secrets. Keeping the secrets is THE PRICE OF BLOOD. (The UK title THE DYING BREED expresses the content well, too.)

Ed Loy, a private investigator, is asked to solve the disappearance of a jockey who worked for the prominent racehorse trainer, F. X. Tyrell. The Tyrells are well known in the region around north Wicklow and the Dublin Border. They, two brothers and a sister, are the usual rich Irish Catholic family: elder brother inherits the farm, younger becomes a priest, and unmarried sister comes home and keeps house for her older brother. Along the way Ed works closely with boyhood friend Dave Connelly, a detective sergeant with the Garda, as they try to solve three murders by the Omega Man, a vicious killer who cuts out the tongues of his victims. (Dave and Ed's trip to the morgue in Chapter Seven explains their camaraderie with a bit of humor.)

This powerful tale takes the reader into the midst of contemporary Irish life in Dublin and features one of Ireland's most anticipated sports events, the four-day Leopardstown Racecourse Christmas Festival.

And reveals the secrets of the industrial schools of yesterday. It seems F. X. Tyrell recruited his jockeys from the lads at the not-quite-an orphanage for wayward boys. After a chilling contemporary visit to the remains of one such school, Hughes comments:

...The basic components were all in place: half-educated Christian Brothers, some of whom had themselves been physically and sexually abused, inflicting that abuse on others; abuse among the boys themselves as the old turned on the young; a collective disbelief among the wider community, including priests, teachers, the Guards, a justice of the peace, and even journalists on the local paper, that amounted to denial...

Hughes has indeed written another Irish tale of family secrets. You'll enjoy reading his previous Ed Loy books, too.

The Wrong Kind of Blood

The Color of Blood
  • Friert
This novel had the makings of a great Irish mystery. Instead, the plot is ridiculously complex. It includes several murders, mutilations, child abuse, incest, fights, and numerous side stories. Whew! No one in our mystery book group liked it.
  • Ranterl
Ed Loy is a private eye, in Dublin. He is hired to try and find someone who's littering on someone's yard (seems ridiculous, doesn't it?) and also hired to find a missing person, by someone else. Of course while following the litterbug, he stumbles on the corpse of the missing guy--the sort of coincidence that could only happen in a ridiculous novel, or reality. In even semi-well-written fiction, the author wouldn't be allowed to do something like this, but Hughes somehow thinks he can get away with it. It's a bit annoying.

I like books with foreign characters and settings as much as the next guy, but when you get to the point where everyone says "f---" as an adjective to everything it gets a bit much, and the whole cast smokes and drinks constantly throughout the story. You wonder how the guy is functioning by page 100 or so--he keeps drinking, at all hours of the day, for the rest of the book. It's annoying, even for someone like me who normally isn't bothered by that.

And the plot is ridiculous. It's overly complex, and very confused. It's hard to keep the characters straight, there are several twists that don't particularly make sense, and the end result is much less than completely satisfying. I frankly found the whole thing pretty boring, and couldn't wait for it to be done.
  • Androwyn
In Dublin, Father Vincent Tyrrell hires private investigator Ed Loy to find missing jockey Patrick Hutton. The case is made complex by the fact that his client offers only a name and that Hutton disappeared about a decade ago. Loy wants to say forget it as he figures he has little chance of finding the man, but the fee is too good to ignore.

Loy knows he must tread the streets very carefully as the Halligan family plan to rough him and more because they hold him culpable for one of them residing behind bars. As he makes inquiries on another case involving a homicide that leads back to Father Vincent's brother affluent business mogul F.X. Tyrell, Loy soon finds himself investigating two other related homicides connected to the Tyrell family. Beaten severely and told to back off or else, Loy keeps digging until the trail takes him to the four-day Leopardstown Race-course Christmas Festival.

In his third appearance (see THE COLOR OF BLOOD and THE WRONG KIND OF BLOOD) Loy does what he does best: gets tattered and threatened but keeps on ticking. The story line is fast-paced from the opening request and though filled with neat twists never slows down until the final altercation. Bruised, battered and beaten, Loy still conducts intelligent inquires whose link is F.X. Private investigative fans will enjoy Declan Hughes' strong Irish mystery.

Harriet Klausner
  • Frdi
The latest in the Ed Loy series has the Irish PI looking for a jockey who disappeared years before after holding back a favorite horse so it would lose. It brings him into the midst of deep dark secrets of a prominent horse-breeding and -racing family. Although there isn't enough information to even begin an investigation, such a lack doesn't seem to deter Loy.

Discovery of the first of several bodies opens the inquiry into the many mysteries of the Tyrell family. All this takes place beginning on Christmas Eve and leads up to the four-day Leopardstown Racecourse Christmas Festival. The story is set among the current and past Irish economic and social conditions, with observations on the people and the Catholic Church playing an important role. The plot involves, as usual, the sins of the fathers cast upon the children.

The drama is high, the writing solid. This third in the series is as gripping as its predecessors, and is highly recommended.