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Download Firetrap: A Novel of Suspense eBook

by Earl Emerson

Download Firetrap: A Novel of Suspense eBook
ISBN:
0345462939
Author:
Earl Emerson
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (November 27, 2007)
EPUB book:
1432 kb
FB2 book:
1308 kb
DJVU:
1699 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
558


Firetrap : a novel of suspense. by. Emerson, Earl W. Publication date. African American fire fighters. New York : Ballantine Books.

Firetrap : a novel of suspense. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

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Earl Emerson (born 1948 in Tacoma, Washington, United States) is an American mystery novelist and author. Emerson is the author of two series of mystery novels, the Mac Fontana series and the Thomas Black detective series, as well as several thrillers. He received the "Best Private Eye Novel" Shamus Award from the Private Eye Writers of America in 1986 for Poverty Bay and an Edgar award nomination for his work. Emerson also works as a lieutenant with the Seattle Fire Department.

Firetrap: A Novel of Suspense. Being a diehard Earl Emerson fan, I looked forward to this book with both avid anticipation and some measure of doubt

Firetrap: A Novel of Suspense. Earl Emerson’s plotting is original, suspenseful–so well done that the richness of his writing seems almost a bonus. has taken his place in the rarefied air of the best of the best. Being a diehard Earl Emerson fan, I looked forward to this book with both avid anticipation and some measure of doubt. Anticipation, because Emerson is a born storyteller/writer and student of human nature-his series characters (Thomas Black and Mac Fontana) are completely believable and engaging, unlike so many mystery book characters who are promoters of the plot, not 'living' people involved in it.

Firetrap: A Novel of Suspense quantity. SKU: 7321 Categories: Books, More thrillers, Thrillers. No one writes with the power, authority, and poetry that Earl Emerson has demonstrated in his action-packed novels about fire and the people who make their living fighting it. In Firetrap, Trey Brown is a man tormented by race, by family, and now by a political firestorm that has erupted because fourteen people died in an illegal Seattle nightclub. and someone must take the fall. Required fields are marked .

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Firetrap: A Novel of Suspense, Emerson, Earl, Good Condition, Book. Firetrap by Emerson, Earl. Free US Delivery ISBN: 0345462939. October 1948 Popular Science Magazine- Home as Firetrap, Idlewild Airport. Firetrap, David Hodges, Good Condition Book, ISBN 0709093055.

Earl Emerson's acclaimed series about Seattle private investigator Thomas Black is. .

Earl Emerson's acclaimed series about Seattle private investigator Thomas Black is much beloved by readers and critics. And with justification. Ann Rule: "Earl Emerson and Thomas Black only get better and better! Earl Emerson has taken his place in the rarefied air of the best of the best!" 'Nuff said. Captain Trey Brown is a black man in a Seattle fire department where the color of his skin keeps him largely on the outside looking in.

No one writes with the power, authority, and poetry that Earl Emerson has demonstrated in his action-packed novels about fire and the people who make their living fighting it. In Firetrap, Trey Brown is a man tormented by race, by family, and now by a political firestorm that has erupted because fourteen people died in an illegal Seattle nightclub . . . and someone must take the fall.Captain Trey Brown is a black man in a Seattle fire department where the color of his skin keeps him largely on the outside looking in. As a child, Trey was adopted by a white family whose children were bred for wealth and power–but now Trey simply does his job, rides his Harley, and lives in bitter solitude. Then the Z-Club goes up in flames, killing more than a dozen people, all of them black, and the city's African American community demands to know: Did these people die because of their skin color?Jamie Estevez, the beautiful, ambitious reporter who becomes Trey's partner in the investigation, is everything Trey is not. Outgoing and gregarious, she tries to bring the lone-wolf fireman back into the world. But as their relationship heats up, Trey is forced to relive a painful episode from his past, when he was accused of a horrible crime and shunned by his adoptive parents. Suddenly, two mysteries–one of passion and family, the other of fire and murder–are unraveling around Trey. But so is everything he has done to protect himself. . . .Firetrap is vintage Earl Emerson: a gritty, emotionally charged novel set in a world of camaraderie and urban chaos, where one man has been a hero, a villain, and a victim–and hasn’t even faced the deadliest danger yet.From the Hardcover edition.
  • Roru
I wasn't keen on Trey Brown's personality. I don't know if it was because this was a white author writing for a black person, but I felt that Trey should have been given more backbone throughout the story. I realize that all firefighters are not alike, but all firemen have a back bone that's almost unbendable. They run into the fire, as we run out. I have to believe in the main character in order to believe in the story. He almost lost me on this one.
  • Rainbearer
Good not great.
  • Humin
Firetrap by Earl Emerson is a page turner. Mr. Emerson knows how to hold your
interest to the last page. He is one of my favorite authors.
  • September
I am so lucky to have a friend who let me read her Advance Reading Copy of this book! As a long-time fan of Emerson's writing, I had high expectations for this book (1) because he never duplicates his plots or his main characters and (2) because he always stretches his craftsmanship. Emerson has moved from mysteries to thrillers, from 3rd person POV to 1st person to multiple POVs. This time around not only do we get multiple points of view to tell the story, but the POVs move back and forth in time. And on top of all of this, the two main characters are African-American, which Emerson is not. How brave is that, to stretch yourself into writing a first person point of view for members of a minority whose feelings on and experiences of racism are as central to this story as the suspense surrounding a fire which claimed the lives of 13 civilians and one firefighter! Does Emerson succeed? Yes. Oh, yes, indeedy! None of that black-hero-has-to-be-rescued-by-his-white-buddy stuff here, no sir. None of that 'well, they weren't really racist, they were just greedy bad guys' either. Emerson nails his villains to the very wall, with redemption for none, while painting a full portrait of how racism can penetrate to the deepest core of family life, as well as influence politics, promotions, and publicity. Yet his villains are not cartoonish; sadly, I've met too many people who closely resemble them. The plot, in a nutshell, is that SFD Captain Trey Brown is put in the position of investigating the fire department's actions during a fire he himself helped fight. This brings him into close proximity with the white family who had adopted him then ostracized him. As he moves closer to identifying the persons who bear some responsbility for the many deaths in the fire, unaware he is being spyed on, his own life is endangered. The story is terrific, and I loved reading the varying perpectives from the different firefighters and victims on what their experience was of the same event. I can hardly wait until this book is published so I can have my own copy to re-read!
  • Pemand
In Seattle, thirteen black civilians and one white firefighter died in the Z Club inferno. The city is divided on how the fire department responded. While many African-Americans claim they watched the white firefighters toss water on the blaze from a safe distance while inside blacks hysterically screamed for help, whites insist the firefighters risked their lives as evidenced by one dying.

African American firefighter Captain Trey Brown was burned fighting the blaze, but left town with his mother and brother to recuperate in Vegas. He comes home to a Seattle battered by rioting over an alleged lack of response by his department; feelings have been enflamed by opportunist politicians and reporters. Though he points out he has a conflict of interest having participated in the event, needing a black face, the brass assigns one of the few African-Americans in a managerial position, Trey, to investigate the response by the department. As he begins his inquiries, TV reporter Jamie Estevez continues her investigation into the response. As their paths cross an attraction grows between them, while the discoveries of what really happened on that fatal night at the Z Club is mind-bending to both of them.

This strong entry starts off with an incredible opening sequences involving Trey reflecting on some of his relationship failures including family estrangement and on the fire (that comes from real events in the Bronx and Rhode Island). The story line is action-packed as Trey and Jamie rotate their respective inquiries until they merge their cases into one. Though the romantic interlude seems forced and the final twists unnecessary as the investigation into the fire and its aftermath hold the audience's attention, Earl Emerson provides a strong thriller.

Harriet Klausner