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Download The Walkaway eBook

by Scott Phillips

Download The Walkaway eBook
ISBN:
0345440218
Author:
Scott Phillips
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (September 30, 2003)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1840 kb
FB2 book:
1518 kb
DJVU:
1623 kb
Other formats
lrf lit doc docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
858


One that got away was Scott Phillips’s debut, The. Ice Harvest. Phillips is a stylish, laconic writer and The Walkaway, in pulling off his merging of two time scales, never. falters for a moment.

One that got away was Scott Phillips’s debut, The. His follow-up, The Walkaway is more ambitious and. equally memorable. It’s a sort of sequel to The Ice Harvest, but it. stands nicely all by its witty, cheerfully lowlife self. What Phillips has created here is one of those rare novels that, in. terms of its subject matter and tone, looks backward with respect to. the classics of the genre from which it arose and, with its intricate.

Scott Phillips is a screenwriter, photographer and the author of seven novels and numerous short stories. His bestselling debut novel, The Ice Harvest, was a New York Times Notable Book and was adapted as a major motion picture starring John Cusack and Billy Bob Thornton. He is the winner of the California Book Award, as well as being a finalist for the Edgar Award, the Hammett Prize and the CWA Gold Dagger Award. Scott was born and raised in Wichita, Kansas and lived for many years in France. He now lives with his wife and daughter in St. Louis, Missouri.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Scott Phillips is the author of the national bestseller The Ice Harvest, which was a finalist for the Hammett Prize, the Edgar Award, and the Anthony Award, as well as a New York Times Notable Book. The crime was unintentional and had no witnesses. The guilty could flee the scene, dispose of the body. He was born and raised in Wichita, Kansas, and lived for many years in France. He now lives with his wife and daughter in Southern California.

With the same flair for dark humor and crime noir that heralded his bestselling debut, Scott Phillips returns with another accomplished novel of deceit, treachery, and old-fashioned greed.

The crime was unintentional and had no witnesses. The guilty could flee the scene, dispose of the body, keep the cash, and simply walk away. But actions have consequences. And even the most perfectly executed walkaway is followed by a shadow. On a snowy Christmas morning in 1979, Gunther Fahnstiel, travelling with his wife, accidentally backed his RV over a stranger, killing him instantly. With the same flair for dark humor and crime noir that heralded his bestselling debut, Scott Phillips returns with another accomplished novel of deceit, treachery, and old-fashioned greed.

At eleven-thirty Steve Blasik stepped into her office. You got Bill Dearden’s number handy? I have it, hold on. o her paperwork. At the clearing of a throat she looked up and found Steve still in her doorway. Are you free for lunch? Around twelve-fifteen? Sure, she said, and again she returned her attention to her work. Ten minutes later the receptionist buzzed her. Loretta? There’s a guy here, says he’s your husband.

Scott Phillips's The Walkaway had me on page two. A great prologue and as a result I got far less done today . The Walkaway begins a few years after Phillips’s debut n It’s hard to know what to expect in a book by Scott Phillips

Scott Phillips's The Walkaway had me on page two. A great prologue and as a result I got far less done today than I'd planned. Oct 14, 2013 Dana King rated it it was amazing. It’s hard to know what to expect in a book by Scott Phillips. The Walkaway begins a few years after Phillips’s debut n It’s hard to know what to expect in a book by Scott Phillips. There will be dark humor, and there will probably be a crime, though not necessarily, and whatever crime is committed may not be strictly illegal; more of a crime against conscience. For all the unpredictability, his books never disappoint.

Walkaway is an adult science fiction novel by Cory Doctorow, published by Head of Zeus and Tor Books in April 2017

Walkaway is an adult science fiction novel by Cory Doctorow, published by Head of Zeus and Tor Books in April 2017. Set in our near-future, it is a story of walking away from "non-work", and surveillance and control by a brutal, immensely rich oligarchical elite; love and romance; a post-scarcity gift economy; revolution and eventual war; and a means of finally ending death.

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Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Treasure troves, Avarice. New York : Ballantine Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

In this steamy follow-up to his award-winning crime noir debut "The Ice Harvest," Phillips unravels another accomplished tale of deceit, treachery, and old-fashioned greed.

The crime was unintentional and had no witnesses. The guilty could flee the scene, dispose of the body, keep the cash, and simply walk away. But actions have consequences. And even the most perfectly executed “walkaway” is followed by a shadow. . . .On a snowy Christmas morning in 1979, Gunther Fahnstiel, travelling with his wife, accidentally backed his RV over a stranger, killing him instantly. In the poor soul’s car was a satchel containing plane tickets, a .22 caliber pistol, a bottle of Johnnie Walker, and more money than Gunther had ever seen in his life. For the debt-ridden old couple, it would indeed be a merry Christmas. But nobody can buy a happy ending. Especially Gunther.Ten years later, under the scorching summer sun, seventy-seven-year-old Gunther walks away from his nursing home and sets off to find the hidden money. But he is not alone: hot on his trail is a former captain of the Wichita police, who is piecing together clues for two unsolved murders; a two-timing, whore-loving local developer, who sees dollar signs if the coot is captured; Gunther’s stepson, a former bouncer turned businessman whose curiosity is peaked by his mother’s creative accounting; and that very same mother (AKA Gunther’s wife), who risks her husband’s safety to keep their secret.As the journey unfolds and the mercury climbs, another story emerges of a U.S. soldier returning to Wichita in 1952 under an assumed name to seek vengeance on his estranged wife. The young patrolman out to protect her is none other than Gunther Fahnstiel, whose actions will reverberate in the lives of all involved nearly half a century later.Cops on the take, jealous husbands with scores to settle, hookers scratching by, cranky curmudgeons, assorted misfits, and a ugly whore named Beulah–all play intricate roles in The Walkway. With the same flair for dark humor and crime noir that heralded his bestselling debut, Scott Phillips returns with another accomplished novel of deceit, treachery, and old-fashioned greed. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Dianazius
It's hard to know what to expect in a book by Scott Phillips. There will be dark humor, and there will probably be a crime, though not necessarily, and whatever crime is committed may not be strictly illegal; more of a crime against conscience. For all the unpredictability, his books never disappoint. The more you read, the more different aspects of Phillips's insight and talent become apparent. This is never more true than in The Walkaway.

The Walkaway begins a few years after Phillips's debut novel, The Ice Harvest, leaves off. Gunther Fahnstiel has done what he did with the money (read the book to find out exactly what), and escaped from the facility where he's being treated for his senility. Gunther sets out with a mission, but his declining mental state keeps him from gaining a firm grasp on what it is, or how he intends to accomplish it; he just knows he has one. His escape sets his friends and relatives in a frantic chase to find him, as well as to discover how he's been paying for some things all these years.

Set against this story are the events of over fifty years previous, when Gunther, then a cop, stood guard over a remote cabin where the winners of the sex lottery at Collins Aircraft collected their prizes. A thoroughly corrupt returning veteran, Wayne Ogden, has returned and has his own reasons for stopping that operation by whatever means necessary.

The Walkaway has Phillips's dry, dark wit, and the writing never interferes with what he wants to say. He weaves at least three stories together with virtuosity: Gunther's mission, the search for Gunther, and flashbacks of what transpired after the war, all of which are related. Elements of The Ice Harvest are referenced. Readers of the more recent The Adjustment will recognize Wayne Ogden, as Phillips integrated that story into seams of this one. (I hadn't read The Walkaway when I read The Adjustment. It was a unique experience to see how he had worked the two together from the other side, so to speak.)

I had a little trouble keeping everyone straight in the beginning. Hang in there. Phillips combs out the threads of each story line from the initial ball of fabric until each character and story line has its own personality. Before long you're shifting points of view and time periods effortlessly, fascinated as each scene brings meaning to others.

By the end I was caught up in Gunther's story. He was what he was and did what he did earlier in life. Now he's a confused old man who isn't sure what he's done or what to do about it. I've never read a book by Phillips I didn't enjoy; The Walkaway is special. It contains all the things that show Phillips's skills while probing emotions in a unsentimental manner that allows the reader to draw his own conclusions and discover his own emotions. A wonderful book.
  • Wenes
Retired cop Gunther Fahnstiel played only a bit part in Scott Phillips' first novel, The Ice Harvest; a sensational example of noir crime writing featuring a narrative that unfolds in the Wichita of 1979. But in Phillips' second novel, The Walkaway, Gunther is front and center.

This fascinating gem of a book is set in the Wichita of 1989, but with frequent extended flashbacks to 1952. So, The Walkaway has the distinction of being both a sequel and a prequel to The Ice Harvest.

The Walkaway has a decidedly complex structure. Not only does the time frame repeatedly jump back and forth between 1989 and 1952, but the identity of the narrator keeps changing as well. In the hands of a less talented novelist, this would result in a chaotic hodgepodge. But Scott Phillips really knows what he's doing. The unconventional construction allows the reader to put the pieces of the various plot threads together and have plenty of fun while doing so.

There's a lot going on in this book. When Gunther, now 77 years old, wanders away from his nursing home, his memory impaired mind dredges up thoughts of Sally Ogden, a girlfriend from the distant past. Sally worked for Collins Aircraft, a local defense contractor. But in her spare time, she was known to supplement her income by hostessing sex parties. Unbeknownst to Sally, her estranged husband Wayne, an Army master sergeant last stationed in Japan, returns to Wichita intent on wrecking her lucrative operation.

As Gunther's concerned friends and family search for him in the Wichita of 1989, author Scott Phillips masterfully reveals what happened between Gunther, Sally and Wayne in the same city 37 years before.

The Walkaway is a very engaging black comedy that succeeds in presenting a largely unsentimental picture of life in middle America. Its intricately crafted narrative is very effective as it relates a number of intertwined stories that span the decades. Original in structure, uninhibited in content and deliciously cynical in its point of view, this book is a refreshing treat. Highly recommended.
  • Sadaron above the Gods
Once upon a time there was a movie on TV entitled "The Ice Harvest," and after watching it, I decided to order the so-called sequel in book form. I suppose buyer's remorse is too weak a term for my reaction to the latter, maybe outright disgust covers it better, though I did
give a second's thought to "unreadable." You get the jist, right?

Honestly, I've read newspaper ad inserts that had more appeal than this novel. Plot? Undiscernable! Characters? Unbelievable! Readers, I think, have a right to expect some sort
of thread that holds chapters, characters, scenes etc. at least s-o-m-e-w-h-a-t together, otherwise why bother?

Save your money, folks, on this one.