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Download Flood (A Novel of the Flood) eBook

by Stephen Baxter

Download Flood (A Novel of the Flood) eBook
ISBN:
0451463285
Author:
Stephen Baxter
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ace (May 4, 2010)
EPUB book:
1647 kb
FB2 book:
1324 kb
DJVU:
1637 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
719


Flood is a 2008 work of hard science fiction by English author Stephen Baxter.

Flood is a 2008 work of hard science fiction by English author Stephen Baxter. It describes a near future world where deep submarine seismic activity leads to seabed fragmentation, and the opening of deep subterranean reservoirs of water. Human civilisation is almost destroyed by the rising inundation, which covers Mount Everest in 2052. Baxter issued a sequel to this work, entitled Ark, in 2009. Flood was nominated for the British Science Fiction Award in 2008.

Stephen Baxter's 'Flood' was a very ambitious novel. Fortunately some of the interesting flood ideas started to kick in pretty quickly and I was hooked until the end. But what terrible characters he gives us!

Stephen Baxter's 'Flood' was a very ambitious novel. It takes place over a period of four or so decades and details the 'aquification' of Earth by subterranian water that slowly, surely seeps up and over all land masses. The book's main charater, Lilly, is a former political hostage/USAF pilot who always manages to be in the right (or wrong?) place to survive the flooding for just a little bit longer. The books was slightly depressing-I wanted to immediately begin work on a backyard spaceship for MY esacape. But what terrible characters he gives us!

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The deeply scary ( BBC Focus ) new novel from a national bestselling and critically acclaimed author

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The deeply scary ( BBC Focus ) new novel from a national bestselling and critically acclaimed author. Four hostages are rescued from a group of religious extremists in Barcelona. After five years of being held captive together.

Flood, by Stephen Baxter, is a well-intentioned effort to replicate this. What a devastating and epic novel. Flood is the story of planetary catastrophe, of a titular flood that subsumes human civilization. Today, climate change is the fear, whose most visible consequence would be rising sea levels. For fans of hard science fiction, perhaps the biggest failure of the book is the wholly manufactured crisis. We’ve been told by trustworthy scientists that a major cometary impact is only a matter of time, so Lucifer's Hammer doesn’t take a huge leap of faith. Baxter offers a small group of characters to humanize this disaster. By the end of the novel, extinction seems certain for humanity on Earth. Human civilisation is almost destroyed by the rising inundati. However, we learn later in the book that Ark Three (the aforementioned ocean liner) was one of many projects created by AxysCorp and a few other groups.

Flood is a haunting apocalypse novel, full of powerful ideas and resonating images of a water-logged planet. He has an essay on the background of the novel, titled The Flooding of London. Though the rise is ultimately (at least possibly) attributed to humanity, this is not some global warming parable. Also, there’s a collection of short fiction from the Flood world, Scrapbook. Additional Thoughts: Two things, actually.

Flood is a 2002 disaster thriller novel by Richard Doyle. Flood (2008 novel) - Flood is the work of hard science fiction author Stephen Baxter. Set in present day London, the novel depicts a disastrous flood and fire of London, caused by a storm, and the consequential accident at an oil refinery, and failure of the Thames Barrier. A burning ship crashes into the Flood Barrier, and wreaks one of the flood gates, unleashing a tidal wave into central London. Firefighters and other first responders from all around the country, supplanted by German, French and American military bravely fight against the disaster, but they can only save a fraction of those threatened.

Stephen Baxter was born in Liverpool, England, in 1957. He holds degrees in mathematics, from Cambridge University; engineering, from Southampton University; and business administration, from Henley Management College. He's a Chartered Engineer and Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society. His books have won several awards including the Philip K Dick Award, the John Campbell Memorial Award, the British Science Fiction Association Award, the Kurd Lasswitz Award (Germany) and the Seiun Award (Japan) and have been nominated for several others, including the Arthur C Clarke Award, the Hugo Award and Locus awards.

A Novel of the Flood Series. Only a few will be able to make the journey-Holle Groundwater is one of the candidates. If she makes the cut, she will live. Please make a selection. We are experiencing technical difficulties.

Электронная книга "Flood", Stephen Baxter. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Flood" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. A Novel of the Flood. Книга 1. Stephen Baxter5 мая 2009 г.

Four hostages are rescued from a group of religious extremists in Barcelona. After five years of being held captive together, they make a vow to always watch out for one another. But they never expected this. The world they have returned to has been transformed-by water. And the water is rising.
  • Akta
This is the story of how ocean levels began to rise. At first, nobody knew why. As the seas overtook more and more land, the story began to become clear (It has nothing to do with global warming). The story follows a number of characters over the course of a number of decades. Some of them are directly involved with the research into what is going on and others are involved in finding ways to deal with it. I'm not sure how scientifically accurate the story is, but it does provide one of those really interesting opportunities to imagine what things would be like if a completely unexpected and irreversible event were to happen on the planet. By the end of the book, the entire globe is covered with water, but there is still more story to tell, so if you like this one, you will probably want to read the sequel, Ark. This was a real page-turner for me and I ended up finishing it in very few sittings. If you like science fiction that doesn't involve aliens, monsters or space battles, you might like this one.
  • Visonima
While a cut above most apocalyptic novels, the narrative tended to slog a bit--thereby reducing the urgency of the planet-wide rise in sea levels. The science BEHIND the rise was curiously inventive though...as was the world's myriad reactions to it. Not quite entertaining enough to reach 5 stars, but enough to order it's followup-Ark. Humanity's last gasp...literally.
  • Laizel
Do not read when depressed. This is a painful, gripping description of the end of the world, as one beloved place after another is drowned. Especially difficult is the generally selfish self-destructive behavior exhibited by the bulk of the characters, save for example, Lilly Brooke, a Brit with dual US citizenship who is a USAF captain flying helicopters without having spent any significant time in the US---unlikely for several reasons (warrant officers fly helios in the USAF).
Baxter is no admirer of human character; like McEwan, he is cruel to his characters, a literary sadist. No uplifting examples herein. But the writing and science is fine indeed. The sequel "Ark" is compelling.
  • Kerahuginn
Stephen Baxter's 'Flood' was a very ambitious novel. It takes place over a period of four or so decades and details the 'aquification' of Earth by subterranian water that slowly, surely seeps up and over all land masses. The book's main charater, Lilly, is a former political hostage/USAF pilot who always manages to be in the right (or wrong?) place to survive the flooding for just a little bit longer. The books was slightly depressing--I wanted to immediately begin work on a backyard spaceship for MY esacape. The reader can see the direction the plotline is stretching long before the characters even think of constructing Waterworld-type rafts. The story was entertaining, but a little deus ex machina, with timeline jumps that leave the reader wondering, "What happened in those 10 years? Really?" Overall, this is a complex, intriguing end-of-the-world book that is a entertaining, if slow read. I rate it a 'MEH'. I may start the next book, 'Ark' soon.
  • LONUDOG
I almost stopped reading this book after the first few pages. The hostage scenario is unsatisfying and unbelievable. Fortunately some of the interesting flood ideas started to kick in pretty quickly and I was hooked until the end. But what terrible characters he gives us! Not one of them acted logically, nor did any of them display any "life" that would make me think they were actual people. They were forced by Baxter from scene to scene to act out whatever was necessary for the story. Why does the rich guy support them for 20 years? No reason at all and certainly none of them offer the slightest thanks to him for it. And what awful whining ingrates the kids are. Kristie and Grace are completely obnoxious whiners. I hope Grace dies in the sequel. You'll be hard-pressed to find a character to care for here. Baxter's splashes of modern "political correctness" don't help either.

Some of his scenarios are good: I'd have liked to hear much more about Tibet, "the year of the big wave", Gordo, Denver and the submariners.

Although I found the book quite engrossing toward the end, it was mainly just to discover how far Baxter would push the world catastrophe. Sadly the mystery of "Ark One" is no mystery at all and after being forced to wait so long for it we're fed the merest crumbs. I suppose that's so we purchase "Ark". I probably will.

I've read a few of Baxter's books now and get the feeling his main talent is in coming up with a reasonably good idea and then quickly pumping out many thousands of words to wrap around it. John Wyndham he is not.
  • Anen
This was vaguely reminiscent of David Brin's Earth, which was a real draw for me. I read that book growing up and was really pulled in to it, so I really looked forward to reading this one after reading the description. The water is rising here on Earth. The book follows a group of people who had been being held as hostages as they reintegrate back into society and try to deal with the coming end of that society. It's fairly large in scope, which really appealed to me, and had a very realistic feel. As the story progresses you learn that Arks are being built ala 2012, but these are actual spaceships intended to leave Earth completely to find and colonize a new world. The ups and downs are realistic, and Baxter really does a great job of dealing with both the light and dark sides of humanity. This book was a lot of fun. I highly recommend it.
  • Hirah
Once you start reading this book its hard to put it down, you juast can't wait to see what is going to happen next. the story get's more exciting the farther into the book you get, i read this book a few years ago and wanted to read it again so i purchased it as it was alwaysd gone when i went to take it out at the library, if you like sicence fiction you will love this book.