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by Minette Walters

Download The Devil's Feather eBook
ISBN:
0307264629
Author:
Minette Walters
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Knopf (August 22, 2006)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1328 kb
FB2 book:
1683 kb
DJVU:
1503 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
332


The Devil's Feather book. I've been reading Minette Walters books now for years and her books are always professionally written with excellent storylines

The Devil's Feather book. I've been reading Minette Walters books now for years and her books are always professionally written with excellent storylines. This book had a brilliant plot and because there were only a few characters you truly felt connected to them. Maybe a little long, I did feel towards the end that I wanted it finished but I did thoroughly enjoy it and would recommend.

The Devil's Feather is Minette Walters' twelfth outstanding thriller. Already the acclaimed author of eleven international bestsellers, Walters has established herself as one of today's leading crime writers. Almost all of her previous novels have been made into television miniseries. She lives with her husband and two children in Dorset, England.

Minette met her husband Alec Walters (University College) .

Minette met her husband Alec Walters (University College) while she was at Durham and they married in 1978. They have two sons, Roland and Philip.

Minette Walters the Devils Feather. 6 people like this topic.

Author: Minette Walters. Have you ever wanted to bury a secret so deeply that no one will find out about it?

Author: Minette Walters. Have you ever wanted to bury a secret so deeply that no one will find out about it? With private security firms supplying bodyguards in every theatre of war, who will notice the emergence of a sexual psychopath from the ranks of the mercenaries? Amidst the turmoil of Sierra Leone’s vicious civil war, the brutal murder of five women is of little consequence and no one questions the ‘confessions’ that were beaten out of three child soldiers

I can only hope that Minette Walters takes a break before writing her next book, and tries to rediscover the form which brought her to public attention in the first place.

I can only hope that Minette Walters takes a break before writing her next book, and tries to rediscover the form which brought her to public attention in the first place. As things stand right now, her formula is wearing very thin.

Minette Walters The Devil's Feather. To Mick, Peggy and Liz for all the good times we’ve had together My particular thanks to Liz for giving me The Devil’s Feather as a title. The secret of happiness is freedom; the secret of freedom, courage. Devil’s feather (derivation Turkish)-a woman who stirs a man’s interest without realizing it; the unwitting cause of sexual arousal. I thank them for their generosity and hope their.

Buried secrets and gritty bravery, The Devil's Feather is the psychological thriller from crime queen Minette Walters. Have you ever wanted to bury a secret so deeply that no one will find out about it? With private security firms supplying bodyguards in every theatre of war, who will notice the emergence of a sexual psychopath from the ranks of the mercenaries? Reuters correspondent Connie Burns is no stranger to the world’s troublespots, including the vicious civil unrest in Sierra Leone and the war in Iraq.

In each of her previous ten critically acclaimed and hugely popular novels, Minette Walters has explored the dark terrain of the human psyche to give us thrillers of exceptional psychological complexity and suspense. Now, in The Devil’s Feather, she gives us her most unexpected and electrifying novel yet.In 2002, five women are discovered barbarously murdered in Sierra Leone. Reuters Africa correspondent Connie Burns suspects a British mercenary: a man who seems to turn up in every war-torn corner of Africa, whose reputation for violence and brutality is well-founded and widely known. Connie’s suspicions that he’s using the chaos of war to act out sadistic, misogynistic fantasies fall on deaf ears—but she’s determined to expose him and his secret.The consequences are devastating.Connie encounters the man again in Baghdad, but almost immediately she’s taken hostage. Released after three desperate days, terrified and traumatized by the experience—fearing that she will never again be the person she once was—Connie retreats to England. She is bent on protecting herself by withholding information about her abduction. But secluded in a remote rented house—where the jealously guarded history of her landlady’s family seems to mirror her own fears—she knows that it is only a matter of time before her nightmares become real . . . .With its sinuous plot, its acutely drawn characters, and its blistering suspense, The Devil’s Feather keeps us riveted from first to last. It is a dazzling reminder of why Publishers Weekly has dubbed Minette Walters “Agatha Christie with the gloves off.”
  • Winawel
This is a book of shadows. Connie Burns, a white native of Zimbabwe, encounters a murky character in Iraq, where she is a war correspondent, and she associates this man with another name, another place, and gruesome unsolved murders of women. She is abducted in a way that leaves authorities to doubt whether it really happened and believes that the abduction and her subsequent release are both effected by the shadowy man with too many names and too much official protection. She retreats to London, where her parents have gone to seek safety after other white Zimbabwean farmers are attacked, and lives a pale existence of fear and anguish over her memories of the three days of her abduction.

Retreating further to Dorset, she feels the presence of the man she knows as "MacKenzie" and some unfinished business that did not end with her release from the cellar in Iraq. Is she just paranoid? And her halting friendship with a strange, enigmatic neighbor named Jess is an almost unwelcome complication, especially since there are skeletons in the closet of Jess that lead directly to the house where Connie has set up her refuge.

This is a well-written book that is paced with dread. There is enough levity to break up a feeling of awful premonition but this is not a jolly read. It is a thriller in the hands of a master.
  • saafari
I always like Walters' work. I am a Ruth Rendell junkie and I don't think I've missed one of Walters' books either. I liked the way she structured the tale in this one.
  • Malara
It was a nice read. I wouldn't say it kept me on the edge of my seat but it kept my interest enough to make me want to know how it ended. I very much liked the last few chapters a lot! Great ending!
  • Kulalas
This book is a thrill to read. Minette Walters is a very intelligent writer with exceptional skill at mastering the psychological and suspenseful aspects of her novels while keeping them timely.

She demands something of her readers that is rare today. It is obvious she writes for she loves the written word, the same as the old classics were. She doen't write to get a best seller - her masterpieces do that on their own. She writes the story she needs to tell. It is obvious she always does much research and her characters are all very real.

But she demands that her readers THINK while reading her works. You can't meander through, look ahead at all. You must invest time to the wonderful adventure she always manages to provide.

And yes, I must admit this is not my favorite from her, but any book from Ms. Walters is far and beyond in quality from most of today's authors. I did find the subject matter thrilling, the war components were very well written and her main character was very real to me.

I recommend this book highly and always await her next release with great excitement.
  • Shliffiana
GREAT
  • Monn
Being a fan of Minette Walters, I was surprised and disappointed to find that this is a Walters book not worth reading. It begins with a bang but quickly descends into a long drawn out story with numerous sub plots about a village and its eccentric inhabitants that have nothing to do with the primary story. The ending picks up a little, but by then I found it hard to care whether, Connie, the heroine ever makes it back from her mental decline to save the day.
  • Vrion
I really enjoy this author. This is typical of her writings--maybe slightly better that most. It's hard to get my nose out of it and do anything else.
Ms. Walters keeps getting better. This book is about how victims of terror become terrorizers and vice versa. It is a close examination of what violence can do to people. The ambiguous ending is just right. One can only hope for a sequel.