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by Robert Stone

Download Damascus Gate eBook
ISBN:
0547599382
Author:
Robert Stone
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mariner Books; Reprint edition (September 6, 2011)
Pages:
528 pages
EPUB book:
1136 kb
FB2 book:
1809 kb
DJVU:
1661 kb
Other formats
lrf txt mbr docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
497


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A stunning novel by a great American writer. Washington Post Jerusalem: home to seekers. The characters in Damascus Gate may be "God- struck," they may dream insistently of a better world, but like so many Stone characters, they end up captives of history and their own very human illusions.

Ambitious, passionate, darkly comic, Damascus Gate is not only Robert Stone’s biggest and best novel to date, but a timely and brilliant story of belief, power, salvation, and apocalypse.

Then he had some coffee and a roll, and took his after-breakfast walk in the neighborhood around the railroad tracks, among the little gardens of oleander and tamarisk.

Then he had some coffee and a roll, and took his after-breakfast walk in the neighborhood around the railroad tracks, among the little gardens of oleander and tamarisk rkish coffee and looked at the paper. On the bottom of page four was a story he had overlooked. AMERICAN CHRISTIAN CLERGYMAN DIES IN FREAK FALL FROM OLD CITY TOWER The early Byzantine aqueduct tower between the Spafford Hospital and the Bab al-Zahra, or Herod's Gate, in the Old City wall was the scene of an unusual accident early Thursday.

Robert Stone is an award-winning American novelist

Robert Stone is an award-winning American novelist. He won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1975 for his novel Dog Soldiers and has twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and once for the PEN/Faulkner Awards.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on April 9, 2012.

A stunning novel by a great American writer. Washington PostJerusalem: home to seekers, heretics, hustlers, and madmen of many faiths. On the cusp of the millennium, Jerusalem has become a battleground in the race for redemption. American journalist Christopher Lucas is investigating religious fanatics when he discovers a plot to bomb the sacred Temple Mount.

In his earlier novels, Robert Stone has taken us to such hot spots as Vietnam, Central America, and that ultimate sinkhole of depravity we call Hollywood. This time around, it's Jerusalem.

On the cusp of the millennium, Jerusalem has become a battleground in the race for redemption. In his earlier novels, Robert Stone has taken us to such hot spots as Vietnam, Central America, and that ultimate sinkhole of depravity we call Hollywood. Given Stone's gift for depicting both political and personal embroilment-indeed, for making the two inextricable-this particular city is an inspired choice.

Damascus Gate (Arabic: باب العامود‎, romanized: Bāb al-ʿĀmūd, Hebrew: שער שכם, Sha'ar Sh'khem) is one of the main entrances to the Old City of Jerusalem.

“A stunning novel by a great American writer.”—Washington Post Jerusalem: home to seekers, heretics, hustlers, and madmen of many faiths. In this most fractious city, a plot unfolds to bomb the sacred Temple Mount.       Christopher Lucas, an expatriate American journalist, stumbles upon the plot while investigating religious fanatics. Entangled in the intrigue are a nightclub singer, an unstable Jewish guru, a strung-out Kabbalist seeking the messiah, and a soldier of fortune routinely found at the world’s violent clashes. A confrontation in Gaza, a chase through riot-filled streets, a cat-and-mouse game in an underground maze—as Lucas races against time, he uncovers the duplicity and depravity on all sides of Jerusalem’s sacred struggle.       An explosive bestseller, Damascus Gate lays bare the dangers at the fringes of faith. “A transcendent thriller.”—Time “Brims over with plots, subplots, and an impressive array of incisively drawn characters . . . The range of [Stone’s] knowledge is spectacular.”—The New Yorker “Damascus Gate asks enormous questions about cosmic truth—and its effect on those who think they own it—with intensity, intellectual rigor and abiding morality.”—San Francisco Chronicle
  • Went Tyu
OK, granted that Jerusalem is a city with more layers than a truckload of onions, but what's wrong with this novel is the moral equivalency on every page. The Israeli Shin Bet (equivalent to our FBI) is not Hamas, yet the author would have us think the two are interchangeable for all practical purposes. And it can hardly be any surprise to anyone who knows anything about modern Jerusalem to know that some lines are blurred but most are not, and that counter-terrorism organizations have to deal with and occasionally use some very, very bad, nasty, violent, unpredicatable, two-faced people. And that believe it or not, Israel is a country ruled by laws, not by renegade officials. The world-weariness of the protagonist is understandable, but as Groucho Marx might say, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the fireplace." Some of the plot is downright impossible, yet there it is as a commentary on modern Israel, as unthinking and biased as some politically correct news outlet (not to mention any names) would write it. The plot is this: a writer gets caught up with people who are definitely up to no good, despite their various covers that include, no surprises here, the UN-- one bit of realism in a setting that seems to otherwise exist mainly in the author's imagination.
  • Quamar
Intelligent, thoughtful and marvellously suspenseful treatment of the religious and secular issues around Jerusalem and Gaza. Even handed and clear-eyed on the good, bad and equivocal in all the players - shocking, horrible, touching and puzzling in turns. Gives full and reasonable consideration to the reality of the religious impulse, without condescension. The best novel I've read in quite a while.
  • Anardred
Chris Lucas, American half-Jewish reporter in Jerusalem, agrees to do a book on the pilgrims to the Holy City who become overly inspired. Beyond the characters with Messianic dreams, there is an assortment of misfits, NGO and U.N. workers, former Communists, archeologists, settlers, nightclub impresarios, drug/arms runners and relief worker wannabes. Stone plots a tight scheme for the coming Millennium and corners the reader in a Bermuda Triangle of intifada, religious zealotry and psyche. I could feel the bullets whizzing past.
  • Brariel
Sure, Bobby Stone never set foot in a creative writing class, except maybe one he taught himself. The guy lives the life, has traveled the globe--had many fine adventures, and is in a race to the finish line with John Blandly, Pantson Fire and B. Sting for the next Pulitzer prize, except, now that I think of it, those other kids may just win a stick of dynamite.
  • Marg
This was good stuff. I am a Stone reader but usually do not pass his books along to my friends for fear of depressing them too much. The Bear and his Daughter is an excellent example. I liked Damascus Gate and the questions pondered. Lucas is a typical disaffected Stone character who is just a tad less jaded than most of Stone's creations. There are many characters to follow but Stone keeps them all memorable and all interesting. So far this is the read of the year.
  • LeXXXuS
If you are looking for a thrill-a-minute page-turner, this book is not for you. If, however, you are more interested in depth than in flash, I recommend Damascus Gate. In a nutshell: Damascus Gate gave me a better understanding of the Israeli/Palestinian situation than any number of non-fiction pieces I've read.
  • Bluddefender
The book starts off slow,however within a few chapters you are swept into the inner walls of the old city and areas beyond- loved the historical , I felt as if I were walking down the streets of Jerusalem and the surrounding areas
Buy this at once and read it. If you already know Robert Stone (I've read all his books), you'll find this is the best. If you're not familiar with him, here's a great place to start. His Jerusalem reminds me a lot of Phnom Penh, and I have seen his characters drunk beside the Mekong...