almediah.fr
» » The Milagro Beanfield War

Download The Milagro Beanfield War eBook

by John Treadwell Nichols

Download The Milagro Beanfield War eBook
ISBN:
0030122511
Author:
John Treadwell Nichols
Language:
English
Publisher:
Holt, Rinehart and Winston; 1st edition (1974)
Pages:
445 pages
EPUB book:
1261 kb
FB2 book:
1813 kb
DJVU:
1379 kb
Other formats
docx mobi doc lit
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
536


The Milagro Beanfield War is a 1988 American comedy-drama film directed by Robert Redford from a screenplay written by John Nichols and David S. Ward based on Nichols' novel of the same name.

The Milagro Beanfield War is a 1988 American comedy-drama film directed by Robert Redford from a screenplay written by John Nichols and David S. The ensemble cast includes Ruben Blades, Richard Bradford, Sônia Braga, Julie Carmen, James Gammon, Melanie Griffith, John Heard, Carlos Riquelme, Daniel Stern, Chick Vennera, and Christopher Walken.

629 pages ; 18 cm. Joe Mondragon, thirty-six with not much to show for it, a feisty hustler with a talent for trouble, slammed his battered pickup to a stop, tugged on his gumboots, and marched into the arid patch of ground. Carefully, if impulsively (and also illegally), he tapped into the main irrigation channel. And so began - though few knew it at the time - the Milagro beanfield war. But like everything else in the dirt-poor town of Milagro, it would be a patchwork war, fought more by tactical retreats than by battlefield victories

Home John Nichols The Milagro Beanfield Wa. The author and publisher have provided this e-book to you for your personal use only.

Home John Nichols The Milagro Beanfield War. Home. The milagro beanfield w. .The Milagro Beanfield War, .

The Milagro Beanfield War has been added to your Cart

The Milagro Beanfield War has been added to your Cart.

The Frontier Bar owner, Tranquilino Jeantete, said (with a sardonic wink) that Joe did it because he was hungry for an enchilada made from honest-to-God Milagro frijoles, with some Devine Company cojones mixed in.

John Nichols reads at a SOMOS event in Taos his humorous take on the hippie days in Taos .

John Nichols reads at a SOMOS event in Taos his humorous take on the hippie days in Taos, New Mexico in 1969. The Milagro Beanfield War Wins Original Score: 1989 Oscars - Продолжительность: 2:49 Oscars Recommended for you. 2:49. Джон Вуден: Разница между победой и успехом - Продолжительность: 17:37 TED Recommended for you. 17:37. Write a Book - Throw it Away! - John Nichols - A Writer's Life 1 - Продолжительность: 7:01 dingopanga Recommended for you. 7:01.

The Milagro Beanfield War book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Milagro Beanfield War. (The New Mexico Trilogy by. John Nichols.

Did You Know? Trivia.

by John Treadwell Nichols. About the Book And so began John Nichols' classic tale of the little guy against the big guy - THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR. Published 1977 by Deutsch in London Milagro, New Mexico. Joe Mondragon, thirty-six, is a feisty hustler with a talent for trouble, who slammed his battered pickup to a stop one day, tugged on his gumboots, and marched into an arid patch of ground. Then, illegally, he tapped into the main irrigation channel. Originally published: New York : Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1974.

The Milagro Beanfield War. John Nichols

The Milagro Beanfield War. Joe Mondragon, a feisty hustler with a talent for trouble, slammed his battered pickup to a stop, tugged on his gumboots, and marched into the arid patch of ground. Carefully (and also illegally), he tapped into the main irrigation channel. And so began-though few knew it at the time-the Milagro beanfield war. But like everything else in the dirt-poor town of Milagro, it would be a patchwork war, fought more by tactical retreats than by battlefield victories. Gradually, the small farmers and sheepmen begin to rally to Joe's beanfield as the symbol.

Very Good Condition, First Edition First Printing 1974, Holt, Rinehart, New York. Binding tight, pages clean, no tears or writing or dog ears, previous owner's name on fep. Mild soiling on page edges. First issue original paper dust jacket good to very good, chip missing from bottom spine, small tear top of spine, mild wear to jacket edges and corners, unclipped. Overall, a very presentable copy of a scarce first edition.
  • Taun
Although the storyline, by any account, is both interesting and relevant, John Nichols’ The Milagro Beanfield War is as much about voice and style as about story and tale: once you fall into his amazing river, you don’t worry so much about where it’s going to take you.

But then, once the river gathers strength and direction, you find yourself seeing the forces at work more and more clearly, as well as the upcoming battle ahead—and you read on (awake, when you should be sleeping) to find out, to find out…

His much larger than life characters (or characters living in a much larger than normal life—for they do) are both pathetic and heroic, and funny; and you cannot help but rooting for them in whatever insanities they set out to achieve. And as an aside, Nichols must have been speaking in Spanish tongues to come up with such a vast field of character names, I continued to amaze at this as I proceeded through the story.

Nichols’ description of Amarante Cordova’s beating Death in seven-card stud poker is, on its own, worth the price of admission and sets the tone for the depth and the bordering on pathological stick-to-itiveness of some of the Milagro populace. Yes, once you’re in with this crowd, you don’t want to leave.

The pebble-pelting Mercedes Rael is another larger than life character that floats in and out of the narrative as real as any ghost. Nichols handles her expertly and you’re always glad to encounter her again in the most unexpected (narrative-wise) places—though always true to the story.

Nichols’ weaving vernacular borders on the miraculous, while through it spring his vast cast of characters, all standing up and casting a shadow (as Faulkner demanded of fictional characters). They grow every-day real as your care and interest increases by degrees and the book (or Kindle) gets harder and harder to put down.

I read this book when first published, but have to admit I didn’t know English quite as well then. Twenty years of reading (and looking up words and their meanings) have primed me better for this experience, and this time around it’s a firework of glittering life.

Perhaps best of all; even character you like can act like bastards, while you understand why they do: that, in my book, is good—and very real—story telling.
  • Gavikelv
John Nichols is a cynical version of Steinbeck. His descriptions of characters and situations are insightful and often just a bit twisted. "Cute" can get tiresome but Nichols usually pulls it back just in time. Haven't seen the movie in years so I decided to read the book. Good read about the clash of lifestyle and varied expectations of what the characters want from their journey through life. Think past the simplistic overused theme of the evil corporation vs the little guy. There's something more important going on here. For those who haven't heard the sound track of the movie i recommend it highly.
  • Hap
Can't help but love the folks of Milagro! Every character is well written, quirky and lovable, and the language of the author is distinctly his own. This great book caused me buy the Robert Redford film, and it is every bit as enchanting as the book. Think I'll do them both again.
  • Hawk Flying
Man this book was great. I saw the film a few years back and although I remember it, reading the book was a whole different ball game. The story was much more intense and enveloped my attention for a few weeks. It is rare to find a book this irreverent and enthralling. Ill likely read it again and again, Que no?
  • Qwne
Milagro seems prophetic today: these kinds of conflicts persist wherever the "haves" in power want what the "have nots" cannot defend, until the latter are fed up enough to rise up and demand their moral rights. It's not the right nor the left that can be said to be the bad guys, it's simply abuse of power. Nichols nails it.
  • fabscf
This is an accurate description of the water issues in all of New Mexico and the misinformation that was given to the people of the state. John Nichols wove a tale of a village on the cusp of losing everything their ancestors had worked for, and he did it with humor and needle sharp accuracy. It is the book that I always send to friends who want to know what New Mexico is all about.
  • Gavirus
This may be Nichol's Best: at once funny, tragic, thoughtful, and thoroughly enjoyable. For once, the 'Meskins' get their
side of the story broadcast, and it's the same as always: they get by, barely, with a sense of humor and a determination to survive.
The book IS a 'milagro' (miracle) of excellent writing, and highly recommended by this critical reader.
I have probably read this book a dozen times, since its publication. It is my "go to" book, in times of stress, because I always read some hilarious anecdote with a new, now older eye. It is tender and frolicking fun!????