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by Ronald Geluykens

Download Politeness in Institutional Discourse: Face-threatening Acts in Native and Nonnative English Busines eBook
ISBN:
3862880478
Author:
Ronald Geluykens
Publisher:
LINCOM publishers (2011)
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Politeness in institutional discourse. Face-threatening acts in native and nonnative English business letters. Communication and socialization skills are a necessity in contemporary business community.

Politeness in institutional discourse. Cambridge Grammar of English: A Comprehensive Guide: Spoken and Written English Grammar Usage. If business professionals are not able to express their ideas clearly, concisely, and appropriately, it will be challenging for them to close international business deals and agreements. In this context, bilateral trade and economic relations between Kazakhstan and other countries have been growing steadily.

Title: Politeness in Institutional Discourse Subtitle: Face-Threatening Acts in Native and Nonnative English Business .

Author: Ronald Geluykens Paperback: ISBN: 9783862880478 Pages: 288 Price: Europe EURO 7. 0 Abstract: This volume reports on a large-scale quantitative investigation into avariety of face-threatening acts in authentic institutional discourse.

Face-threatening acts in business English: Directness vs. indirectness. The CHILDES project Hillsdale. The eight strategies tested were systematically varied across three syntactic/semantic features. Introducing ACID: The Antwerp Corpus of Institutional Discourse. Politeness strategies in business letters by native and non-native English speakers

Face-threatening acts in business English: Directness vs. In: J. V. der Auwera, F. Durieux and L. Lejeune (ed. München: Lincom Europa. 195 - 20. oogle Scholar. Interface 10: 83–101. Politeness in English and German: The functions of Please and Bitte. Politeness strategies in business letters by native and non-native English speakers. English for Specific Purposes 11: 189–205. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

to faculty members by native and nonnative English speaking graduate students.

Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

2011 Politeness in Institutional Discourse: Face-Threatening Acts in Native and Nonnative English Business Letters. 1967 Interaction Ritual: Essays on Face-to-Face Behavior. Harmondsworth: Penguin. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Jucker, Andreas . and Irma Taavitsainen.

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Geluykens, . "Face-threatening acts in business English: Directness vs indirectness", in: Auwera, Van der, . F. .Geluykens, . K. Pelsmaekers: (in press) "Analyzing institutional discourse: An introduction", in: Discourse in Professional Settings. Durieux, L. München: Lincom Europa, 1998). Pelsmaekers (ed. : (in press) Discourse in Professional Settings. München: Lincom Europa). de HTML-Einrichtung: Izabela Klak Informationskennung: FO11GC02 Datum: 2000-08-03.

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This volume reports on a large-scale quantitative investigation into a variety of face-threatening acts in authentic institutional discourse. The contrastive analysis is based on a substantial corpus of 600 native English, interlanguage (Dutch-English) and native Dutch business letters. In all, over 2,000 tokens of face-threatening acts are analyzed, covering a wide range of face threats (such as requesting, promising, offering, inviting, warning, apologizing, wishing, thanking, and confirming). The analysis, which employs Brown and Levinson's (1987) politeness model, focuses on a number of distinct but related research questions, such as: -Pragmatic Variation: How are face-threatening acts realized in written business discourse? In particular, to what extent do writers use lexical, syntactic and textual resources to mark (im)politeness? -Interlanguage Variation: To what extent do native and interlanguage English realizations differ? Can such differences, partly or completely, be attributed to pragmatic transfer from the interlanguage users' L1 (in this case Dutch)? -Cross-Cultural Variation: To what extent do English and Dutch realizations differ, and what repercussions does this have in terms of politeness? The book attempts to bridge the gap between three fields: politeness research, institutional discourse studies, and cross-cultural pragmatics (see also the Geluykens & Kraft 2008 volume in this series). It should thus be of interest not just to researchers working in the field of linguistic (im)politeness, but also to all those interested in institutional discourse in general, and business writing in particular, and last but not least to practitioners in cross-cultural and interlanguage pragmatics. ISBN 9783862880478. LINCOM Studies in Pragmatics 20. 288pp. 2011.