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» » 2009 Energy Data Book Series: Biomass Energy Data Book - Ethanol, Biodiesel, Biorefineries, Feedstocks, Oilseeds, Mill Wastes, Pellet Fuels, Tertiary Biomass Feedstocks, Urban Residues (Ringbound)

Download 2009 Energy Data Book Series: Biomass Energy Data Book - Ethanol, Biodiesel, Biorefineries, Feedstocks, Oilseeds, Mill Wastes, Pellet Fuels, Tertiary Biomass Feedstocks, Urban Residues (Ringbound) eBook

by Department of Energy

Download 2009 Energy Data Book Series: Biomass Energy Data Book - Ethanol, Biodiesel, Biorefineries, Feedstocks, Oilseeds, Mill Wastes, Pellet Fuels, Tertiary Biomass Feedstocks, Urban Residues (Ringbound) eBook
ISBN:
1422019357
Author:
Department of Energy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Progressive Management (October 4, 2008)
EPUB book:
1281 kb
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1337 kb
DJVU:
1919 kb
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The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Feedstock Supply and Logistics (FSL) program focuses on technologies an. .

Biomass Energy Data Book - Free ebook download as PDF File . df), Text .

energy security and mitigate environmental problems. Shifting dependence from petroleum-based to renewable.

This concept of biorefinery is the future of biomass processing technologies .

Forest biomass, agricultural residues and energy crops constitute the three major sources of biomass for energy, with the latter probably developing into.

The book begins with a brief but interesting history of ethanol production . Fuel economy and the various gasoline/ethanol blends are discussed and how ethanol might improve fuel economy.

wood and biomass waste consumption .

The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable.

This ringbound book provides a reproduction of the Biomass Energy Data Book, prepared for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It features hundreds of detailed tables, charts, and graphs. Contents include: Acronyms, Introduction to Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol, Biodiesel, BioOil, Biopower, Biorefineries, Feedstocks, Secondary Biomass Feedstocks, Oilseeds, Mill Wastes, Pellet Fuels, Tertiary Biomass Feedstocks, Urban Residues, Landfill Gas, Conversions, Biomass Characteristics. The purpose of this data book is to draw together, under one cover, biomass data from diverse sources to produce a comprehensive document that supports anyone with an interest or stake in the biomass industry. Given the increasing demand for energy, policymakers and analysts need to be well-informed about current biomass energy production activity and the potential contribution biomass resources and technologies can make toward meeting the nation's energy demands. This is the first edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book. This first edition focuses on biomass conversion technologies and commercially utilized biomass resources. Biomass energy technologies used in the United States include an extremely diverse array of technologies - from wood or pellet stoves used in homes to large, sophisticated biorefineries producing multiple products. For some types of biomass energy production, there are no annual inventories or surveys on which to base statistical data. For some technology areas there are industry advocacy groups that track and publish annual statistics on energy production capacity, though not necessarily actual production or utilization. The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces annual estimates of biomass energy utilization and those estimates are included in this data book. Information from industry groups are also provided to give additional detail. An effort has been made to identify the best sources of information on capacity, production and utilization of many of the types of biomass energy being produced in this country. It is certain, however, that not all biomass energy contributions have been identified. The information may not be available, or may be proprietary. It is even more difficult to track the diverse array of biomass resources being used as feedstocks for biomass energy production. Since most of the biomass resources currently being used for energy or bioproducts are residuals from industrial, agricultural or forestry activities, there is no way to systematically inventory biomass feedstock collection and use and report it in standard units. All biomass resource availability and utilization information available in the literature are estimates, not inventories of actual collection and utilization. Biomass utilization information is derived from biomass energy production data, but relies on assumptions about energy content and conversion efficiencies for each biomass type and conversion technology. Biomass availability data relies on understanding how much of a given biomass type (e.g., corn grain) is produced, alternate demands for that biomass type, economic profitability associated with each of those alternate demands, environmental impacts of collection of the biomass, and other factors such as incentives. This book presents some of the information needed for deriving those estimates, as well as providing biomass resource estimates that have been estimated by either ORNL staff or other scientists. For estimates derived from ORNL analysis, the methodology has been documented in Appendix C and additional references have been provided. In all cases it should be recognized that estimates are not precise and different assumptions will change the results. Biomass is material that comes from plants. Plants use