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Download WHAT THE BODY REMEMBERS. eBook

by Shauna Singh. Baldwin

Download WHAT THE BODY REMEMBERS. eBook
ISBN:
1862300771
Author:
Shauna Singh. Baldwin
Language:
English
Publisher:
Anchor (2000)
EPUB book:
1759 kb
FB2 book:
1977 kb
DJVU:
1232 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
232


Shauna Singh Baldwin has created very real and flawed characters-a fact that I love. The title of the book is most apt in this age where we are increasingly appreciating the truth of what the body remembers.

Shauna Singh Baldwin has created very real and flawed characters-a fact that I love. Satya, Sardarji's first wife, is bitter after the embarrassment of not delivering a child after many years of marriage.

Shauna Singh Baldwin was born in Montreal and grew up in India. She is the author of English Lessons and Other Stories and the novels What The Body Remembers and The Tiger Claw. Her short fiction, poetry, and essays hav. ore about Shauna Singh Baldwin. About Shauna Singh Baldwin. In some bookclubs, readers have discussed What the Body Remembers as "a feminist book" and others as historical fiction - "a Partition novel" - and of course it is both, assuming you define feminism as the radical idea that a woman is a person. Some readers get the analogy between Sardarji’s marriage and the larger political scene at once, and for some it has to be pointed out.

What the Body Remembers book. It's very hard to read but Shauna Singh Baldwin treats the difficult material with incredible tenderness and empathy. In fact, you'd think that seeing all the destruction from a Sikh point of view (my first experience of this POV) would encourage feelings of blame or disgust. But that's not the effect at all.

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Shauna Singh Baldwin. A multiple award winning writer, Shauna Singh Baldwin has written several books and her fiction and poems are widely published in literary magazines. Literary Fiction, India, Women Fiction, Canadian Author. From the author of What the Body Remembers, an extraordinary story of love and espionage, cultural tension and displacement, inspired by the life of Noor Inayat Khan (code name Madeleine ), who worked against the Occupation after the Nazi invasion of France. When Noor Khan’s father, a teacher of mystical Sufism, dies, Noor is forced to bow, along with her mother, sister and brother, to her uncle’s religious literalism and ideas on feminine propriety.

In What the Body Remembers, with her sharp focus on women in such turmoil, Baldwin offers us a moveing and engaging look at 20th-century India's most troubled years.

Shauna Singh Baldwin's What the Body Remembers begins and ends with rebirth-an apt metaphor, perhaps, for the .

Shauna Singh Baldwin's What the Body Remembers begins and ends with rebirth-an apt metaphor, perhaps, for the tragedy of Indian partition that forms the backdrop. As the self-proclaimed Shauna Singh Baldwin fan, I may be slightly biased but this book definitely made an impact on me because I thought about the storyline and the characters for days afterward and has made me yearn for a sequel!

Shauna Singh Baldwin (born 1962) is a Canadian-American novelist of Indian descent.

Shauna Singh Baldwin (born 1962) is a Canadian-American novelist of Indian descent. Her 2000 novel What the Body Remembers won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize (Canadian/Caribbean Region), and her 2004 novel The Tiger Claw was nominated for the Giller Prize. Her second short-story collection, We Are Not in Pakistan, was released in Canada in 2007. Baldwin was born in Montreal, Quebec. She currently lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

by Shauna Singh Baldwin. Told through the stories of two Punjabi women, Satya and Roop, who are both married to a rich land owner

by Shauna Singh Baldwin. Told through the stories of two Punjabi women, Satya and Roop, who are both married to a rich land owner. Their lives are totally disrupted by the political unrest that follows independence, when they realise that their land and home are on the wrong side of the divide. A sad and poignant story, which I very much enjoyed. Find similar books Profile. Roop's tale draws the reader immediately into her world, making the exotic familiar and the family's story startlingly universal, but What the Body Remembers is also very much Satya's story. She is mortified and angry when Sardarji takes Roop for a wife, a woman whose low status Satya takes as an affront to her position, and she adopts desperate measures to maintain her place in society and in her husband's heart.

  • Ka
This may be the best Indian historical novel I've read to date--certainly, about the end of the Raj. For a week and a half, I was utterly swept up into the world of Roop and Satya, the two wives of Sardarji Singh, a wealthy Sikh landowner who also works as an engineering officer for the (British) Indian Civil Service in 1940s Punjab. The lives of these two women illustrate a quest for personal happiness and self esteem, mirroring the desperate struggle of Sikhs to remain living in their homeland. Many female Sikh, Muslim and Hindu charactesr in the story face sexism from their families; they are taught to say yes and agree to anything meted out to them, even when the result may be fatal.

Shauna Singh Baldwin has created very real and flawed characters--a fact that I love. Satya, Sardarji's first wife, is bitter after the embarrassment of not delivering a child after many years of marriage. Roop is naive and shallow when at age 16, she willingly marries Sardarji, thinking only about the riches and leisure that should await her. What a rude awakening she as when Satya uses her to her own devices. Both characters grow in a way that is intensely satisfying. The battle between Roop and Satya mirrors Sardarji's own fight to keep his holdings and life in Punjab, while facing the realities of the inevitable British pullout of India in 1947.

I adored the history of Sikkhism, politics, and daily life in Punjabi households, great and poor. The last two chapters include scenes of violence that may be very disturbing to some; however, I feel they had to be there, to truly make the story believable and as haunting as it turned out to be.
  • Dori
This is a beautifully written novel. Shauna Singh Baldwin creates intricate characters that are completely believable in their complexity. And her plot is continually full of surprises. Once I started reading the book, I couldn't put it down. Nor could I help wondering: What if Sardarji had not chosen a second wife, had grieved his not begetting a child with Satya, and had devoted his life to her? What if Satya had transformed her anger and resentment of Sardarji and believed in his goodness to her? What if Satya had transformed her jealousy of Roop and befriended her rather than taking revenge? In her own way, Shauna Singh Baldwin does weave transformation into her characters.

The title of the book is most apt in this age where we are increasingly appreciating the truth of what the body remembers.

Enjoy a great read!
  • Ueledavi
I knew about the partition of India into Muslim and Hindu states after Independence, but half a world and half a century away from the events, I had no clue about what that actually meant to the people who were living in that part of the world. It's less a novel of plot than of experience, told from the perspective of those who suffer the most when a people is squeezed on the hinges of history. I could not put it down, and I have not had that experience for a long time. I urge anyone serious about stepping beyond the predicability of a novel of plot or relationships to read this book. I cannot understand why it has taken so long for it to catch on in the U.S.
  • Briciraz
What the Body Remembers falls into the genre known among my friends and I as "awful/wonderful." "Awful/wonderful" books tell painful truths in such a compelling manner that the reader greedily ingests them, even aches for more. This book, with its no-holds-barred tale of the treatment of women in India, whether Muslim, Hindu or Sikh, can be painful to read--but it's impossible not to. Of all the novels I've read by and about Indian women's lives, What the Body Remembers was by far the most disturbing. And yet I was sorry to close it after reading the last page--it was throughly engrossing, and as fascinating in its way as Memoirs of a Geisha. I highly recommend it.
  • Jack
Happy to have this book, needed it for class.
  • Risinal
Many of the other 5-star reviews provide an excellent summary of the book. the characters--men and women--will remian in your mind and heart long after you've finished the book. And after a long tale filled with some happiness and some great sadness, the ending will change everything. this is one of those books that you willl be very happy to have read.
  • MilsoN
It is a wonderful description of where I grew up and how the partition of the country took place,
So few people in the western world know of the terrible times in India at the time of the partition. This very human story depicts the life of a Sikh girl who has so little control over her own fate and the story of a family trying to survive the horrors of racial and civil war.