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Download A Pirate of the Caribbees eBook

by C. J. de Lacy,Harry Collingwood

Download A Pirate of the Caribbees eBook
ISBN:
1444452096
Author:
C. J. de Lacy,Harry Collingwood
Language:
English
Publisher:
ValdeBooks (October 19, 2009)
Pages:
174 pages
EPUB book:
1154 kb
FB2 book:
1139 kb
DJVU:
1847 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
377


by Harry Collingwood (Author), Charles J. De Lacy (Illustrator). One of Collingwood's better books. When he writes about the sea life, he is really entertaining

Similar authors to follow. by Harry Collingwood (Author), Charles J. When he writes about the sea life, he is really entertaining. When it comes to land adventures, he strays off into less believable and unrealistic scenarios.

Home Harry Collingwood A Pirate of the Caribbees. By harry collingwood. Who eber hear ofbrack demon turnin' out at four o'clock in de mornin' to make coffee foryoung gentermen, eh?

Home Harry Collingwood A Pirate of the Caribbees. Chapter one. A frigate fight in mid-atlantic.

A Pirate of the Caribbees. by. Collingwood, Harry, 1851-1922; Lacy, . Book from Project Gutenberg: A Pirate of the Caribbees. gutenberg etext 21073. Lancaster, William Joseph Cosens.

A Pirate of the Caribbees book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. A Pirate of the Caribbees. Harry Collingwood, C. Lacy (Illustrator).

A Pirate of the Caribbees - Harry Collingwood. Author: Harry Collingwood. Project Gutenberg's A Pirate of the Caribbees, by Harry Collingwood. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with. almost no restrictions whatsoever. Release Date: April 13, 2007.

You can read A Pirate of the Caribbees by Collingwood Harry in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

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Though it's known today as a paradise for sun-worshipping tourists, the Caribbean's past is much darker. Books related to A Pirate of the Caribbees. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

A Pirate of the Caribbees". Cariacou-and afterward. I become the victim of a villainous outrage. In the power of the enemy.

  • Mavegar
This is a nice, mindless read in the tradition of British hero-pirates beating up on their blood enemies, the Spanish. Despite the fact that it uses -- maybe even invented, given that it was written over 100 years ago -- all of the usual pirate cliches (with the exception of rescue of a beautiful damsel in distress/captivity, it makes a fun read. It's a little unusal in that the pirating (sp?) that goes on is all pre-1600, so that some of the descriptive material is historically significant and information -- e.g., the reader is reminded that arquebuses were the shoulder-fired weapons of that age, using a piece of lit slow-fuse to ignite the powder and fire the weapon, and also provided the distinction between the early-style ship designs like the caravel (with top-heavy fore- and aft-castles) and later, more advanced designs with lower centers-of-gravity and better sea-keeping characteristics.
  • Leyl
A swashbuckling tale of the pirates and the West Indies. One of Collingwood's better books. When he writes about the sea life, he is really entertaining. When it comes to land adventures, he strays off into less believable and unrealistic scenarios.
  • Sagda
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Loved it. It is the story of a young officer's rise to command a frigate before the Revolutionary War. Written in the first person, it is filled with details of working the ship: finding positions and headings, hauling and trimming the yards and maneuvering to get the weather gauge on your enemy. I love this salty stuff. Fortunately I have a dictionary of nautical terms on my Kindle. I needed it. There is lots of swashbuckling adventure, nasty bad guys, and close calls. No sex. Not for everybody, perhaps, but I dug it.

Does anybody know if this is the source for the Disney movie? I did not recognize any of the characters.
  • Welen
I read this just after "Treasure Island" because I wanted 'more' piracy. This book did not dissapoint. I looked forward to reading my daily chapter (or two or three). One great feature is the author doesnt mingle in boring fluff. Great read if you are either interested in the "salty jargon" or don't mind what's happening to the ship. For its time there isnt overt racism, mostly character casts, and very little of it.
  • Chuynopana
I love a book that is fun to read and full of real facts! It was loaded with wonderful descriptions of wind, waves and weather and filled with nautical terms. My imagination was sparked. It was a fun escape. I loved the main character. reminded me a little of my well loved Hornblower series.
  • Ueledavi
Having had a chance to read this book and thoroughly enjoy it, I would like to offer my strong and heartfelt recommendation that other readers, some of whom may have seen contemporary pirate films or read contemporary pirate books and stories, read this true life account. I don't think they'll feel disappointed. As the saying goes, you can't make this up.
  • Buge
In the style of the Hornblower series but no where near as good. Some of the events are so ridiculous as to defy belief. The nautical details are extensive ala C S Forester but the plot is trite and .predictable.
Got this as a free read, it was alright of a cheap romance novel. wouldn't have spend my hard earned money on it.