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by Lisa See

Download Shanghai Girls eBook
ISBN:
1408804638
Author:
Lisa See
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bloomsbury; Export and UK open market ed edition (2010)
EPUB book:
1603 kb
FB2 book:
1335 kb
DJVU:
1213 kb
Other formats
lrf lrf txt mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
517


Shanghai Girls by Lisa See got thumbs-up from our book club. Growing up in Shanghai, May and Pearl Chin are both models for . Li, a painter and photographer, whom they both fall in love with.

Shanghai Girls by Lisa See got thumbs-up from our book club. As "beautiful girls," the sisters live a life of parties and glamour until their father loses the family fortune and sells the girls to prospective husbands. It's a disturbing scene that's not for the faint of heart. Eventually they make it to America and are interned at Angel Island for a long time.

Home Lisa See Shanghai Girls. Shanghai Girls takes place between 1937 and 1957. Readers will find some of what today we would call politically incorrect terms, but they are accurate to the time. I have used the Wade-Giles system of transliteration for Chinese words-whether in Mandarin, Cantonese, or in the Sze Yup and Wu dialects-again in keeping with the era.

Also by lisa see. Peony in Love.

Lisa See. Shanghai Girls. A novel about two sisters, two cultures, and the struggle to find a new life in America while bound to the old, Shanghai Girls is a fresh, fascinating adventure from beloved and bestselling author Lisa See. For readers of the phenomenal bestsellers Snow Flower and the Secret Fan and Peony in Love-a stunning new novel from Lisa See about two sisters who leave Shanghai to find new lives in 1930s Los Angeles. May and Pearl, two sisters living in Shanghai in the mid-1930s, are beautiful, sophisticated, and well-educated, but their family is on the verge of bankruptcy.

Lisa See Shanghai Girls For my cousin Leslee Leong, my cohort in memory keeping Author’s Note Shanghai Girls takes place between 1937 and 1957. Читать онлайн Shanghai Girls. I have used the Wade-Giles system of transliteration for Chinese words-whether in Mandarin, Cantonese, or in the Sze Yup and Wu dialects-again in keepi. Lisa See. For my cousin Leslee Leong, my cohort in memory keeping.

See’s Shanghai Girls is one of those books I could not wait to continue reading, because her characters’ stories . Lisa See's Shanghai Girls helped to shape the literary landscape of Los Angeles.

See’s Shanghai Girls is one of those books I could not wait to continue reading, because her characters’ stories are so compelling told. St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Fast-moving plot takes readers from glamorous Shanghai to the louse-infested Hong Kong waterfront to Los Angeles Chinatown’s ticky-tacky souvenir shops and greasy cafes.

Shanghai Girls takes place between 1937 and 1957.

Shanghai Girls - Lisa See. SHANGHAI.

Lisa See: Discovering the Past - Conversations from Penn State - Продолжительность: 56:51 . HD) Walking in Shanghai at Night (Nanjing Road) - Продолжительность: 9:40 JeromeRicks Recommended for you. 9:40.

Fireplace Relaxing JAZZ - Smooth JAZZ & Bossa Nova - Chill Out Music Lounge Music 2 467 зрителей. David Gilmour " Guitarist Extraordinaire " - Продолжительность: 21:47 HDPinkFloyd Recommended for you. Rickshaws clatter past. Beggars squat on the ground, their arms outstretched, their palms open. Barbecued ducks hang in the windows rying bean curd

Lisa See. Barbecued ducks hang in the windows rying bean curd. Peddlers sell bok choy and melons from baskets. Farmers have come into the city, carrying bundles of live chickens, ducks, and pig parts hanging from poles slung over their shoulders. Women drift past in skintight cheongsams. Old men sit on upturned crates, smoking pipes, their hands tucked into their sleeves for warmth.

  • Kagaramar
First, the history re: Chinese & Japanese during WWII & when the Japanese took over China is SPOT ON. Also everything until the 1950’s is completely accurate, and I really appreciated that. Second, I truly have mixed reactions to this book! I loved the way Pearl and May were complete opposites , yet Pearl was such a ‘poor poor me’ and technically so was May in her own world, the same. But with as many pages/hours were in ‘Shanghai Girls’ it nearly drove me to jump out a window with all the hardships they go through!! I got to a point where I said to myself, “NOBODY could have endured all of this!”

I also hated the graphic visions to, it really bothered me, and not in a way where I didn’t know..in a way where I thought it was too much. There are a lot of other things that I thought were either too much or not enough, that’s why I said I had a mixed review, and I’m really not sure how I truly feel?!

If I had known there was a part 2 to this novel I may not have read it, because the end was not satisfying enough to stand alone, in fact not at all, but I didn’t figure that out until the last 20 min...giving this story a 3.8 is pretty generous.

Like I said, it was spot on to what Chinese woman and families went through, but I’m just not the happiest finishing it either. As far as recommended, you need to know it’s graphic for that period of time.
  • Cordanius
If you like historical fiction, you'll love this. I don't know much about the Chinese experience in the United States, and it tells a lot. Provocative. It made me think about my family relationships. This one is primarily about 2 sisters, but it could be about any family relationship. It also made me think about prejudice. I could really empathize with the characters in the book.
  • Sha
I suspect with over 500 reviews anything i have to say will be redundant, however having just traveled to Shanghai, walked the Bund, and visited the 19th century "concessions," I may have something to add. Let me begin with a suggestion that readers may also choose to rent/purchase a documentary called "Shanghai Ghetto." While in Shanghai, we visited a little-known ghetto devoted to German Jews who who sought refuge in China just before and during WWII. The visuals in this documentary serve to enlighten the images that author, Lisa See, so adeptly describes in Shanghai Girls.
The story of these young women and their families is extremely well told. It is filled with tragedy and hope. What better ending could one ask for, in a time of world war and extreme racial profiling. It rivals The Good Earth, but focuses on the middle/upper middle class Chinese -- not the peasants that are so well detailed in Pearl S. Buck's well known novel. Both writers are very adept at character development ... to the point that the reader knows them so well ... they must surely live next door.
  • Dorintrius
Shanghai Girls by Lisa See got thumbs-up from our book club. Growing up in Shanghai, May and Pearl Chin are both models for Z.G. Li, a painter and photographer, whom they both fall in love with. As "beautiful girls," the sisters live a life of parties and glamour until their father loses the family fortune and sells the girls to prospective husbands. The girls refuse and during the Japanese invasion of Shanghai in 1937, they attempt to cross the countryside to make their escape. Along the way they have a horrific encounter with Japanese soldiers. Brace yourself. It's a disturbing scene that's not for the faint of heart.

Eventually they make it to America and are interned at Angel Island for a long time. In order to stay in America, the sisters marry the Louie brothers who are strangers to them. In Los Angeles Chinatown, under one roof they find that life is very challenging with racial and financial struggles. Slowly they assimilate to their new family and carve out very different lives. Pearl is the responsible one. She and her husband raise baby Joy while still meeting the familial obligations to Louie's parents. May's new husband is mentally impaired, very childlike, and she seeks out a more self-centered lifestyle.

The book is fast paced enough, but at the very end, hang on for a ride, because it goes at warp speed. There's a lot going on with when now grown-up daughter, Joy, discovers past cover-ups and lies, false family ties, and the identity of her real parents. It ends with Joy running off to communist China. At that point our book club smelled a sequel, and sure enough a couple years later Dreams of Joy was published.
  • Akir
Such a sad, heartbreaking, cultural, heartwarming, interesting and makes you on edge!!! Although it is really sad it just reminds us that we don't really understand what war does to civilians and innocent people. Really eye opening and makes you really get into the book and the characters. Some Romance, Wont go into details, you'll just have to buy it and read for yourself.
  • Simple fellow
This was an interesting book. My neighbor said I had to read it and Im glad I did. I thought it was well written and had some twists and turns that I didn't expect. Im now reading the sequel Dreams fo Joy and am finding it also well written and takes me to a new place with each chapter. It's definitely worth the read. I found myself waking up at night and pushing myself to stay awake to read more.
  • JOIN
I chose this rating because I was fascinated by the story. The Chinese culture, lifestyle with extended families, and the history of "paper sons, wives and partners " was interesting and unknown to me. I found the characters likeable and I was eager to understand and to learn about them as they progressed through their lives. I have just purchased "Dreams of Joy" to continue to follow the sisters and their daughter. Thank you Lisa See for another lovely novel, though difficult to tolerate the injustices incurred you manage to keep these sisters' dignity, individual strengths, and vulnerability respectable throughout the story.