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Download The World to Come eBook

by Dara Horn

Download The World to Come eBook
ISBN:
014103131X
Author:
Dara Horn
Language:
English
Publisher:
Penguin Books Ltd; Open market e. edition (July 5, 2007)
EPUB book:
1663 kb
FB2 book:
1365 kb
DJVU:
1200 kb
Other formats
lit mobi doc mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
255


If so, Dara Horn’s The World to Come is the literary equivalent of that confection, equal parts mystery . Throughout this rich, complex and haunting novel, Horn reminds us that our world poses constant threats to the artist and to art, to the individual and the creative spirit.

If so, Dara Horn’s The World to Come is the literary equivalent of that confection, equal parts mystery, sprawling novel, folktale, philosophical treatise, history, biography, love story, and fabulist adventur. .Horn’s novel develops in unpredictable, deeply satisfying ways, steeping the novel in Jewish mysticism and calling to mind the work of Isaac Bashevis Singer, Bernard Malamud, and Philip Rot. Their very survival is a miracle: in a sense, every one of us is that bearded man flying, unaware, over Vitebsk.

Dara Horn is a two-time winner of the National Jewish Book Award for Fiction and one of Granta’s Best American . On an impulse, he takes the picture.

Dara Horn is a two-time winner of the National Jewish Book Award for Fiction and one of Granta’s Best American Novelists. She lives in New Jersey with her husband and four children. On this slender hook, author Dara Horn has wound stories about living through the worst times (Stalinist Russia), losing those you love, welcoming new life and new people into your own story. The family in the story is Jewish and the references to Stalinist Russia also included the real life author known as Der Nister.

The World to Come book. the metaphor seems to go on for ages. She proves then RE-proves her point. which probably has more to do with their fates as dimestore prophets.

Dara Horn's romantic tale about the redemptive power of art, The World to Come, appeals to Frank Cottrell Boyce. As well as moving this affair forward, however, the book reaches back through time to Benjamin's mother, and to Chagall

Dara Horn's romantic tale about the redemptive power of art, The World to Come, appeals to Frank Cottrell Boyce. As well as moving this affair forward, however, the book reaches back through time to Benjamin's mother, and to Chagall. Some of the best sections deal with Chagall's time as an art teacher in a Russian orphanage in the 1920s. The children are all Jewish, and all have lost their parents in the terrible pogrom of 1919. The orphanage is a kind of testing bed for the redemptive power of art. Almost everyone who worked there became a major artist and almost every one of them was later a victim of the gulag.

Amazingly, Dara Horn's The World to Come is all of the above. Ms. Horn hits every note in the literary register from historical tragedy to mystical delirium, and plays them like a master. Binnie Kirshenbaum, author of An Almost Perfect Moment. Like a spider weaving her web - miraculously - Dara Horn weaves the poignant stories of lives past, lives present, and lives to come in this splendid tale of storytelling itself. A terrific yarn peopled with tender and very human characters, a page-turning mystery of the best sort: not who done it, but why.

In the World to Come, Dara Horn manages to weave family history with myths of birth and paradise to create a beautiful tale. She begins with Ben Ziskind, who steals a Chagall painting from a museum when no one is looking. Ben is going through a bit of a personal crisis at the time, so it's unclear whether he is correct that this painting once belonged to his family or he is simply becoming delusional. We soon come to understand Ben, his motives, and his fears. Horn's real talent is the ability to switch between scenes, timelines and perspectives all while keeping the interest of the.

The incomparable Dara Horn returns with a spellbinding novel of how technology changes memory and how memory shapes the soul.

Anything you lose comes round in another form. by Bernard Malamud · Dara Horn. The incomparable Dara Horn returns with a spellbinding novel of how technology changes memory and how memory shapes the soul. Software prodigy Josie Ashkenazi has invented an application that records everything its users do. When an Egyptian library invite.

A million-dollar painting.

Dara Horn (born 1977) is an American novelist and professor of literature

Dara Horn (born 1977) is an American novelist and professor of literature.

A million-dollar painting by Marc Chagall is stolen from a museum. It is this expertly rendered juxtaposition of the spiritual with the secular that makes The World to Come so profound, and so compelling to readers

A million-dollar painting by Marc Chagall is stolen from a museum. The unlikely thief is Benjamin Ziskind, a thirty-year-old quiz-show writer. As Benjamin and his twin sister try to evade the police, they find themselves recalling their dead parents-the father who lost a leg in Vietnam, the mother who created children's books-and their stories about trust, loss, and betrayal. It is this expertly rendered juxtaposition of the spiritual with the secular that makes The World to Come so profound, and so compelling to readers. As we learn near the end of the beautiful tale, "The real world to come is down below-the world, in the future, as you create i.

  • VariesWent
This is not my usual reading and I must admit I first picked up the book, drawn by the cover art work. How shallow is that? But, I have to confess, I loved it. A rumination on birth, death, loss, God and Heaven, the book has passages that made me cry and others that I am still pondering a month after having read them. The story is simple-a recently divorced man, also coping with the loss of his mother, attends a museum function and finds a picture by the Russian artist, Marc Chagall which he remembers hanging in his family house. On an impulse, he takes the picture.
On this slender hook, author Dara Horn has wound stories about living through the worst times (Stalinist Russia), losing those you love, welcoming new life and new people into your own story. The family in the story is Jewish and the references to Stalinist Russia also included the real life author known as Der Nister. I found his part of the story so touching that I purchased one of his books, which is now patiently waiting its turn in the reading pile.
Philosophers will tell you that religion is simply wish fulfillment. We can’t accept death, of ourselves or our loved ones, so we create a Heaven where we know that we will see them again. While I don’t subscribe to this, intellectually it does sense. Religion is based on faith which is so personal and sacred, it can be difficult to describe in words. This book does that. There is a brief passage in the middle of the book that really resonated with me. Imagine a baby in the womb-the only life it knows. Now imagine the baby is a twin, in the womb with another being. Again, the only life the two infants have ever been aware of. Suddenly, one twin is snatched away, screaming and crying. The other twin is left along for a few minutes, mourning the loss of the departed twin. But then the final twin is born and is reunited with their sibling, outside the womb in the arms of their mother. What a perfect description of death. I have mentioned this analogy to several friends who can’t refute the logic of the story. We only know what we are aware of-none of us alive have actually experienced a final death (I am not counting back from the dead, did you see the light stories).
The book has two endings-one of which has frustrated many readers who don’t feel closure with the story. For those, I simply say Shrodinger’s Cat. No spoilers, but keep that in mind when you are reading. The other ending is incredibly moving and so well written it will stay with you long after you finish the book. Yes, religion might simply be wish fulfillment but I prefer to have faith in something I can’t prove but simply feel is true.
  • Wenyost
I got to the second chapter and came upon a description of some boys torturing a horse. Then came the scene where a newborn baby is thrown through a window by a home invader. NOT for me. Why do I want to read about really unpleasant scenes where helpless babies and animals are harmed by evil people? How does that make anybody's life better?! What the @#$% is LITERARY about that?
  • Winn
I wanted to like this book. Unfortunately, it tries to do way too much— a less egregious thing than not trying to do enough, but the outcome isn’t all that different. I have no idea what happened to two of the characters— two important characters!! They just sort of.. disappear. Also, the idea that someone would be able to forge a Chagall painting in a few hours... not very plausible. Too many dream sequences. Oh well.
  • Bandiri
Frankly, I don't get all the super positive reviews. I am at 56% and would normally have chucked the book, but the reviews are all so positive, i.e. it changed my life, I am giving to all my friends, etc. I have to finish it to see if anything really positive happens. I shlould have gone along with the 2 and 3 star reviews,even though they were in the minority.
  • Hudora
What a great read! My book club found so much to talk about in this book. We all agreed that the author has great wisdom beyond her young years. Her imaginings of the afterlife were thoughtful and provocative. The plot development which jumped back and forth in time was intriguing. We also found ourselves wanting to read more from the Jewish Russian writers referenced throughout the book. All in all, a deeply satisfying novel by an author from whom we'd like to hear more from again.
  • Sironynyr
I admit that I struggled with impatience for the pieces of the various stories to finally come together. This isn't the easiest book to read, but ultimately it proved to be worth the wait as the author builds the narrative into something beautiful and ugly, painful and soothing. A superbly written work of fiction layered into the backdrop of fine art and literature composed by masters under the duress of such horrible events in history.
  • Ielonere
I am so moved by this book - overwhelmed by the thoughts, feelings, and knowledge that I've experienced while reading it. I'd known nothing about the historical figures, and by reading the book on my Kindle Fire, I was able to research them as I read about them; this made the book even more amazing. I will definitely re-read parts of this book over and over again - especially the last chapter. Though I'm not Jewish, nor do I belong to any organized religion, this book moved me deeply. I would recommend this book to anyone not Jewish, who loves to experience new ideas, and to everyone who enjoys feeling strong emotions while reading. Thank you, Amazon, for making this book a Daily Deal; I probably would have never known about this book otherwise. Thank you, Dara Horn for writing it!
I liked the premise of the book but as it went on it tried too hard to be too lofty. And what's with the author's obsession with the little dip under one's nose? It could be a drinking game how many times that odd body part gets mentioned. And the story of how the father lost his leg seemed totally unnecessary and way too long. I do not recommend this book. Sorry to the author.