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Download Oogy eBook

by Laurence Levin

Download Oogy eBook
ISBN:
059306643X
Author:
Laurence Levin
Language:
English
Publisher:
Random House Export (January 1, 2011)
EPUB book:
1582 kb
FB2 book:
1901 kb
DJVU:
1164 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
220


Lawrence William Levine (February 27, 1933 – October 23, 2006) was an American historian. He was born in Manhattan and died in Berkeley, California

Lawrence William Levine (February 27, 1933 – October 23, 2006) was an American historian. He was born in Manhattan and died in Berkeley, California. He was noted for promoting multiculturalism and the perspectives of ordinary people in the study of history. He graduated from the City College of New York in 1955, and from Columbia University, with a master's degree and a doctorate in 1962, where he studied under Richard Hofstadter

Laurence Levin and his family live in Philadelphia. He and his wife Jennifer are both lawyers.

Laurence Levin and his family live in Philadelphia. Their sons, Noah and Dan, are seventeen. Quickly, the tone of the book gradually turns from depressing to uplifting as Levin begins to describe how Oogy easily becomes the family's third adopted son. The ups and downs associated with Oogy's life in the Levin house are often humorous; a trademark commonly found in most books written about family pets. Belying the positive progression of Oogy are the recurring maladies that serve as a constant reminder of the dog's earlier suffering and the pending vacancy created by Levin's sons leaving for college.

In 2002, Larry Levin and his twelve-year-old sons, Dan and Noah, took their elderly cat to the vet to be put to sleep

In 2002, Larry Levin and his twelve-year-old sons, Dan and Noah, took their elderly cat to the vet to be put to sleep. Yet what began as one of the family's saddest days took a sharp turn for the better when the oddest-looking dog they had ever seen bounded across the waiting room into their arms. The friendly white puppy was missing an ear and half of his face was covered in scar tissue, but Larry and his boys soon discovered the truth - the puppy had been used as bait in a dogfight and left for dead, and it was only the tireless work of their local veterinary staff that.

Laurence Levin has been a lawyer for over thirty years and is now in private practice. In 1982 he married Jennifer Berke, an attorney.

In 2002, Larry Levin and his twelve-year-old sons, Dan and Noah, took their elderly cat to the vet to be put to sleep. Laurence Levin has been a lawyer for over thirty years and is now in private practice. Their sons, Noah and Dan, were born in 1990. This is Larry's first book. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

The Dog Only a Family Could Love. The Dog Only a Family Could Love.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love. Laurence M. Levin, Larry Levin. 6 Mb. Peyronie’s Disease A Guide to Clinical Management. Category: medicine - surgery. Библиографические данные.

Oogy by Laurence Levin and Publisher Transworld Digital. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781409045700, 1409045706. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780553824179, 0553824171. Publisher: Transworld Digital. Print ISBN: 9780553824179, 0553824171.

Now in paperback, the New York Times-bestselling story of a puppy brought back from the brink of death, and the family he adopted.In 2002, Larry Levin and his twin sons, Dan and Noah, took their terminally ill cat to the Ardmore Animal Hospital outside Philadelphia to have the beloved pet put to sleep. What would begin as a terrible day suddenly got brighter as the ugliest dog they had ever seen--one who was missing an ear and had half his face covered in scar tissue--ran up to them and captured their hearts. The dog had been used as bait for fighting dogs when he was just a few months old. He had been thrown in a cage and left to die until the police rescued him and the staff at Ardmore Animal Hospital saved his life. The Levins, whose sons are themselves adopted, were unable to resist Oogy's charms.Heartwarming and redemptive, OOGY is the story of the people who were determined to rescue this dog against all odds, and of the family who took him home, named him "Oogy" (an affectionate derivative of ugly), and made him one of their own.
  • Castiel
I didn't get this book when I first saw its listing because I was afraid it would be too sad, even if only in parts. Big mistake. This absolutely special story is so well written that it lets the reader come to grips with Oogy's background gradually such that the loving family who adopts him is the primary focus. Is the physical damage to Oogy horrific? Absolutely! However that is what made Oogy who you will come to adore. His adoptive family and his life with them is so unique and heartwarming that I loved reading this story. His family shows that 'There are still giants among us!'
  • White_Nigga
Some of the critics did mention how at the beginning, the book went very slowly...which it did.Oogy I then thought, "Why would someone write a story about a super dog and have it be so much of a sleeper?"

Oogy turned out to be the product of a dog fighting bunch that used him as a "Bait Dog" since he wouldn't fight and as a result he was terribly injured and the gang left him for dead. Happily, some very kind cops and animal health folks decided to take care of him.

The author and family had taken their old cat to the vet so she could be euthanized and in a serindipidy kind of setting passed Oogy being taken out for a walk. Oogy went nuts for the author and his twin boys and the rest is history, as they say.

The author's family discovered by accident that Oogy was in fact a Dogo Argintino, a breed developed in the 1920's for help in combating the huge epidemic in feral giant wild boars in Argentina.

The Dogo is really a giant Pit Bull/Stafforshire on steroids generally weighing in at between 75 and 125 pounds. (Oogy weighed about 75 pounds since he'd been so abused).

The blessing about the Dogo is that the breed was made into one that was absolutely the best and most protective around its family and the family's friends. It was common in the Levin houshold to see the twin boys and their friends on the family's couch with Oogy sound asleep across the whole bunch.

Don't worry, this book does not end with Oogy passing away...so don't be affraid of that since I am too. Anyway, just buy the book; I guarantee you will love it. I read most of the remainder of the book on the way home on the five hour US Air flight from Washington, DC back to Phoenix. (For some reason my eyes sprung a leak on the way home...must have been an alergic reaction to 39,000 feet).

My wife and I are now looking for a Dogo for us. We have 2 and 1/2 acres for him to run plus I need the excercise too!
  • Zainn
From a life that started off with horrible abuse - being used as "bait" for fighting dogs - the story has a fairy tale ending. At a Vet's office, the author spotted Oogy's lopsided grin, missing ear and disfigured face, and they were miraculously drawn toward each other. It's a fast and quick read and the author is not a professional writer, but it is entertaining. You can see from the writing that the family loves this dog and Oogy loves his family.
  • Usanner
Sappy dog-lover books have become quite popular ever since "Marley and Me" dominated both the best-seller list and the box office several years ago ... maybe it's because most of us have actually been "blessed" with a "Marley" or two in our lives. On the other hand, maybe it's because more recent news events have shined a light on the sinister world of man's cruelty to his supposed "best friend" that we are inundated with heartbreaking ASPCA commercials and books on canine redemption ("The Lost Dogs"). For me, the answer was neither; this book was purchased based solely on the cover ... Oogy himself. Seeing that droopy, lopsided, one-eared face staring at me seemed to offer an intriguing story that was too compelling to pass. Although I knew reading this book would likely be somewhat emotional, I just hoped that I wasn't setting myself up for a lingering bout of depression. Although the story is pretty rough in the beginning, it becomes fairly obvious toward the end of the book that Oogy just might become another celebrity, like Marley.

A difficult visit to his vet's office to euthanize his beloved aging cat leads to the author's initial encounter with a happy, but horribly disfigured one-earned dog that looks like a pit bull. Intrigued by the dog's appearance, Levin discovers that the pup's deformity is the result of him being used as a disposable, living chew toy for fighting dogs ... likely due to his non-aggressive demeanor. Drawn to the dog's sad story and pathetic appearance, Levin offers to adopt the pup, even though he realizes the myriad of challenges associated with adopting a dog under such circumstances. It is at this point where the author is reminded of similar apprehension when he and his wife, after a long wait, were finally notified that their desire to be adoptive parents came to fruition ... in the form of twin boys. Taking a chance on adopting a severely wounded dog involved with fighting may turn out to be just as much of a blessing as adopting his twin sons.

As Levin and his family adjust to life with their new companion, it is through frequent visits to the vet's office that Levin learns of the extent of Oogy's horrific injuries and the likely causes. We come to find out that Oogy being alive is the biggest miracle of all. It is also during these vet visits, the author discovers Oogy is not what he actually appears to be. Quickly, the tone of the book gradually turns from depressing to uplifting as Levin begins to describe how Oogy easily becomes the family's third adopted son. The ups and downs associated with Oogy's life in the Levin house are often humorous; a trademark commonly found in most books written about family pets. Belying the positive progression of Oogy are the recurring maladies that serve as a constant reminder of the dog's earlier suffering and the pending vacancy created by Levin's sons leaving for college.

The story of Oogy is a positive and enjoyable light read. For the dog lover, the first several chapters will likely be painful to read, but Levin details the suffering only to the point of effectively hooking the reader on Oogy and his story ... you become a fan and want to share in his redemption. At times, Levin can be a little "syrupy", especially when recanting his efforts to eliminate any and all perceived suffering or inconvenience Oogy may experience ... no matter how natural, trivial or small. But the reader is ultimately rewarded by Levin sharing his dog's truly amazing story from barely surviving to become a much-beloved family member.
  • Lli
I saw this book on a bookshelf in an RV park. I read the first chapter that night and then purchased it when I got home. I rescued a pitbull mix when she was a puppy apparently left out in below freezing temperatures. She was wonderful with my newborn son and adopted daughter. She lived a full life and still has a place in my heart.

Larry Leavin writes a beautiful and inspiring story of how a disfigured dog bonded and blended happiness into his life and the life of his sons'.