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Download Me and the Spitter;: An Autobiographical Confession eBook

by Gaylord Perry

Download Me and the Spitter;: An Autobiographical Confession eBook
ISBN:
0841502994
Author:
Gaylord Perry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Saturday Review Press; 1st edition (1974)
Pages:
222 pages
EPUB book:
1930 kb
FB2 book:
1129 kb
DJVU:
1967 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
672


Me and the Spitter" was written by Gaylord Perry in 1974, when he was at the pinnacle of his career. Perry knew opposing hitters would read this book, and there is the possibility that Perry had no more than a very good slider pitch.

Me and the Spitter" was written by Gaylord Perry in 1974, when he was at the pinnacle of his career. Gaylord was well known for throwing the "dipsy doodle" also known as the "spitball". My Life in Baseball If hitters "thought" Perry, with his tricky antics of before throwing a pitch would touch various parts of his face, arms, ears, belt, . all to make a hitter "think" the ball was doctored, he could psychologically beat the hitter before a pitch was even thrown.

Me and the Spitter: An Autobiographical Confession is a 1974 autobiography by Major League Baseball pitcher Gaylord Perry, which details how he cheated, doctoring baseballs with spit and Vaseline. Cleveland sportswriter Bob Sudyk co-authored the book with. Cleveland sportswriter Bob Sudyk co-authored the book with Perry.

Me And The Spitter; book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Me And The Spitter;: An Autobiographical Confession as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Well written, moves along nicely, sounds like it really is Gaylord talking, and has lots of good material about the spitter. Written in mid-career. Many of his detractors accused him of cheating, but since Perry hung up his cleats in 1983, baseball fans have seen everything from "corked bats" to steroids to get ahead.

Gaylord Jackson Perry, American Former professional baseball player. Me and the Spitter;: An Autobiographical Confession. Perry, Gaylord Jackson was born on September 15, 1938 in Williamston, North Carolina, United States. Recipient Cy Young Member award American League, 1972, Cy Young award National League, 1978; member National League All-Star team, 1966, 70, 79, American LeagueAll-Star team, 1972, 74; inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, New York, 1991. 02994/?tag prabook0b-20.

Me and the Spitter: An Autobiographical Confession is a 1974 autobiography by Major League Baseball pitcher Gaylord Perry, which details . This article about a non-fiction book related to sports is a stub.

com Prime B&N Member Books A Million Club eCampus Member Indigo.

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Me and the Spitter: An Autobiographical Confession is a 1974 autobiography by Major League Baseball pitcher Gaylord Perry, which details how he cheated, doctoring baseballs with spit and Vaseline.

Gaylord Perry 1938- American baseball player Source for information on Perry, Gaylord: Notable Sports Figures . We just pitched until we got tired," Perry later wrote in his book, Me and the Spitter: An Autobiographical Confession "And a desire to win just developed naturally.

Gaylord Perry 1938- American baseball player Source for information on Perry, Gaylord: Notable Sports Figures dictionary. I believe the long hot hours in the fields gave Jim and me a physical and mental discipline that has helped us on the mound. Perry was introduced to organized ball in high school. As a member of the Williamston High team in his freshman year, he threw two shutouts on the way to winning the state championship.

Book by Perry, Gaylord
  • Delalbine
Very enjoyable book, and a great seller to work with.
  • avanger
Perfect purchase.....
  • artman
Ought to be an all-time baseball best seller
  • JUST DO IT
The book arrived in excellent condition and it was a first edition....good price...thanks alot...it was a special gift for a special person.
  • Keel
"Me and the Spitter" was written by Gaylord Perry in 1974, when he was at the pinnacle of his career. Gaylord was well known for throwing the "dipsy doodle" also known as the "spitball". Many of his detractors accused him of cheating, but since Perry hung up his cleats in 1983, baseball fans have seen everything from "corked bats" to steroids to get ahead. So was Gaylord cheating, or did he do what he had to do to survive? You, the fan, must be the judge. Red Faber: A Biography of the Hall of Fame Spitball Pitcher One wonders as they read this memoir if he ever even had a "spitter", as some fans suggest that this book was written as a psychological ploy, or a decoy. Perry knew opposing hitters would read this book, and there is the possibility that Perry had no more than a very good slider pitch. My Life in Baseball If hitters "thought" Perry, with his tricky antics of before throwing a pitch would touch various parts of his face, arms, ears, belt, e.g. all to make a hitter "think" the ball was doctored, he could psychologically beat the hitter before a pitch was even thrown.

Umpires would follow his every move on the mound. Opposing batters would scream insults at him. Protesting managers would be tossed out of games because of him. Rival teams would train cameras on him. However, this eventual Hall of Famer managed to pitch in the major leagues from 1962 to 1983 without ever being caught. Whether this book is trickery or not, Perry cheerfully confessed in "Me and the Spitter" who taught him the pitch, how it was done, and why no umpire could ever detect it. Coming Back with the Spitball The only reason I gave this book 4 stars instead of 5 was because this book is only 222 pages, of which the first 100 are devoted to his childhood and his high school and minor league career. Perry kind of "whizzed" through his rise to fame, but when he went into his story, he hit hard with good, cold facts, and excellent stories. Perry early in the book explained that in 1964, while pitching for the San Francisco Giants, the team made a trade during spring training for pitcher Bob Shaw.

Perry was a power pitcher, with only a curve ball and fastball. Upon meeting Shaw, Perry commented: "I noticed right away that some of his pitches traveled to the plate in a very unnatural way. My eyes near popped from my head. I knew how Tom Edison felt when he discovered the electric light. Bob Shaw promptly became my idol. Shaw threw the illegal spitball, one of the best I've ever seen". After working with Shaw all spring, Perry undertook the following task: "I had to learn how to load it up, how big a load the ball would carry. Where to drop the load, how to grip the ball, how to release it, how to control it. Spitballers: The Last Legal Hurlers of the Wet One And probably more important of all, how to hide it from four umpires, three coaches, a manager and 25 players on the field, as well as spying executives up in the box seats." The first time Perry used it in a major league game was on May 31, 1964 at old Shea Stadium in New York against the New York Mets. He pitched in the second game of the longest doubleheader in history, a total of 32 innings of baseball, 9 the first game, 23 the second, almost ten and one half hours of playing time. The 2 teams squared off at 1 P.M. in the afternoon and just barely got to the showers by midnight.

In the second game, Perry was called in with the score tied 6-6 in the bottom of the 13th inning. Little did Perry know he would pitch 10 scoreless innings with "a little help" Called in with no outs, runner Jim Hickman on second base, Chris Cannizzaro on first, and Galen Cisco, the Mets' pitcher, at bat, Perry described the following: "Another fight broke out on the top of the Mets' dugout. Everybody stopped to watch. using the fight as a cover, I held the ball up to my mouth and spit right on her just like I read Burleigh Grimes used to do. The Cheater's Guide to Baseball Nobody saw me do it, especially Cannizzarro who was on first, Hickman on second and Galen Cisco, the Met pitcher in the batter's box. Cisco didn't have a chance." After Perry threw his "super sinker" a/k/a/ "spitball" to Cisco, an inning ending double play ensued, and Perry's usage of his out pitch forever became his trademark. In fact, in "Me and the Spitter", Perry remarked on this day the following: "On May 31, 1964, I became an outlaw in the strictest sense of the word-a man who lives outside the law, in this case the law of baseball.

On May 31, 1964, I started down-or up, depending on how your point of view, I suppose-a path that would lead me through the emery ball, the "K-Y" ball, the Vaseline ball and the sweat ball, just to name a few. During the next eight years or so, I recon I tried everything on the old apple but salt and pepper and chocolate sauce topping." Did it help Perry? Here are his stats. From the time he broke into baseball in 1962 to when he retired in 1983, he won 314 games and lost only 265 games with a lifetime ERA of 3.11. Yankee for Life: My 40-Year Journey in Pinstripes His best years were 1966 (21 wins-8 losses), 1969 (19 wins and 14 losses), 1970 (23 wins 13 losses), 1972 where he won the Cy Young Award with the Cleveland Indians going 24-16, 1974 (21 wins and 13 losses) and 1978 with the San Diego Padres (he won the Cy Young award that year as well) going 21-6. He pitched a no-hitter against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1968. In 23 major league seasons, Perry struck out 3,534 hitters, was in 5 All Star Games, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

There are so many wonderful anecdotes in this book it was like traveling back in time. Perry recalled working on his father's farm when he was young, in a small town called "Farm Life", North Carolina. After his rise to the major leagues, Perry wrote about the S.F. Giant-Los Angeles Dodger "wars" of the 1960's. Perry was there when Juan Marichal cracked Johnny Roseboro over the head with his bat, opening up a 2 inch gash in his forehead. Willie Mays: The Life, The Legend Perry also recounted the "Say Hey Kid", Willie Mays, collapsing from fatigue twice on the field from fatigue and exhaustion. There are wonderful stories of Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Bobby Bonds, Sam McDowell (Perry was traded to the Cleveland Indians at the end of the 1971 season for McDowell) and all the catchers that helped him disguise the trick of his trade. Perry even rehashes his clashes with Bobby Murcer, who called the Commissioner of baseball "gutless" (Bowie Kuhn) for not doing anything to stop Perry from cheating.

It is interesting to note that Perry does mention in the book the following in regard to his spitball usage: "Of course, I'm reformed now. I'm a pure, law abiding citizen. Game of Shadows: Barry Bonds, BALCO, and the Steroids Scandal that Rocked Professional Sports I've come to realize that spitting is a nasty habit, and unsanitary to boot. Unfortunately, a cloud of suspicion still hangs over my head, but that's not my fault. I can't help it if some people have suspicious natures, and most of them happens to be opposing managers. Regardless, one wonders why Perry even wrote this book, denying usage of the spitter, but yet detailing the "how's" and whys" of it's usage. Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big Perry had the following to say about that: " There is no way umpires or batters can prove I haven't fictionalized my spitter and greaser in this book. They have never found a thing on the ball. And they never will. They've never thrown me out of a game while pitching, and they've never found anything on me."

Having the last word, Perry sums it up: "Why am I telling all this now? Because I feel the spitter-the greaser-has been good to me, and I want to be good to it. I think the spitter has added controversy and excitement. My Prison Without Bars It has livened up more ball games than wearing double knit uniforms and letting hair and whiskers grow. With all the controversy surrounding me and the spitter, I thought baseball fans might like to know the truth." Between incidents such as Pete Rose's embarrassing banishment from baseball for gambling, George Brett's "Pine Tar Incident", the Jose Canseco "Kiss and tell all" book, and the infamous "Balco Lab" and Barry Bonds scandal, it seems in retrospect that what Perry said about livening up the game might very well be innocuous. Love him, hate him, or indifferent to him, Gaylord Perry was certainly a character, and any baseball fan of the 1960's or 70's will absolutely love this book!
  • Alsanadar
Well written, moves along nicely, sounds like it really is Gaylord talking, and has lots of good material about the spitter. Written in mid-career. One very interesting tidbit is the story of his first time throwing the spitter in a major league game, because it's a game that many of us old-timers remember for a different reason: it was the 23-inning game in 1964 between the Giants and Mets, which I think was also the first-ever extra-inning game at Shea Stadium. I remember that I noted at the time what a great relief job Gaylord did -- he pitched the last 9 or 10 innings -- but of course we didn't know about the secret subplot. (The losing pitcher, a guy with a similar first name, Galen Cisco, also pitched the equivalent of a complete game and also did a great job.) Gaylord was then a marginal young pitcher on the verge of getting shipped out, and he had to do SOMETHING; I guess we'd have to say it worked. In the end portion of the book, he explains that he had stopped putting anything illegal on the ball and that he was able to get it to do the same tricks just by using his perspiration. But, of course, who really knows?
  • Beahelm
As a huge baseball fan and avid reader of sports books, I was a little skeptical about the quality of this book when I found it at an estate sale. I bought it anyway, and started reading it when I got home. I read the entire book that evening, and read it twice the following day. It is that hilariously funny, and very well written. I can't say enough good things about this book. Mr. Perry's description of his home life, and characterizations of the umpires he would become intimate with over the years are wonderful. This book rates as the best biography of a baseball player ever. Nowhere is humor and readability combined with the history and making of great ballplayers. Get this book and read it, and I should add, no baseball book I have read deserves another printing more than "Me and the Spitter".
The autobiography of Gaylord Perry was published when he was winning games for the dreadful Cleveland teams in the 1970s. Perry was a fan favorite and basically the major gate attraction in the cavernous Cleveland Municipal Stadium.

As an aside, I wonder what the fate of the club would have been without Perry. There were rumors abound that the franchise was destined to be sold to business interests in New Orleans due to fan apathy.

The book is an honest look at his life on and off the field. There was a growing market for baseball books "written" by players during this era, with a focus on - of course - the New York Yankees.

If you are interested in this period of baseball - and want to get away from the Bronx Zoo - then Me and the Spitter is your diamond gem.