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by Michael Jones

Download The Retreat eBook
ISBN:
0719569729
Author:
Michael Jones
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hodder Hb (2010)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1988 kb
FB2 book:
1134 kb
DJVU:
1582 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
406


The Retreat: Hitler's First Defeat is a 2009 book by military historian Michael K. Jones. In the shadow of Napoleon.

The Retreat: Hitler's First Defeat is a 2009 book by military historian Michael K. At the gates of Moscow. Ten days in December. Stand fast! "This is all there really is?". Looking into the abyss. The first butterfly of Spring. 2009, The Retreat: Hitler's First Defeat (John Murray).

In The Retreat, Michael Jones has written that rare history book that gives both the bird's eye view of what is happening overall, as well as what's happening to people on the ground

In The Retreat, Michael Jones has written that rare history book that gives both the bird's eye view of what is happening overall, as well as what's happening to people on the ground. Many similar books simply recite names and dates and unit movements and casualty rates and how a battle was fought. Other books focus on the people caught up in historical circumstances, with little or now attention to the larger picture.

This latest book from Michael Jones covers the German offensive in 1941 to take Moscow, Operation Typhoon, and the subsequent Soviet counter-offensive, leading to Hitler’s first retreat

This latest book from Michael Jones covers the German offensive in 1941 to take Moscow, Operation Typhoon, and the subsequent Soviet counter-offensive, leading to Hitler’s first retreat. The book is easy to read and offers a nice overview of this period but nothing too technical or in-depth, more of a general or popular historical narrative. There are a number of black. 2 Publishing history.

In THE RETREAT, Michael Jones, acclaimed author of LENINGRAD, draws upon a mass of new eye-witness testimony from both sides of the conflict to tell, with matchless vividness and comprehensiveness.

In THE RETREAT, Michael Jones, acclaimed author of LENINGRAD, draws upon a mass of new eye-witness testimony from both sides of the conflict to tell, with matchless vividness and comprehensiveness, of the crucial turning point of the Second World War - the moment when the armies of Hitler could go no further - and of the titanic and cruel struggle of two mighty empires.

Jones and Turner Workshop. Business Owner · 2017 to present · Crestwood, Kentucky. If you see it on Pinterest, we can build it!

Stalin also interfered constantly in the campaigns of 1941-42, most often to refuse consent for units, indeed whole armies, to save themselves from destruction by retreating from untenable positions

Stalin also interfered constantly in the campaigns of 1941-42, most often to refuse consent for units, indeed whole armies, to save themselves from destruction by retreating from untenable positions. The strategic blunders of two of the 20th century's great mass murderers entailed the deaths of millions of their own people, but Hitler's also proved fatal to his own cause.

Hitler's First Defeat. Most of the book describes what happened after October when, within 100 miles of Moscow, three Wehrmacht armies launched a final push. By November, they had surrounded the city on three sides, but stiffening resistance and brutal weather defeated the exhausted, hungry, freezing troops. A Soviet offensive drove them back as much as 200 miles before the front stabilized in February. Quoting liberally from letters, diaries and interviews from both sides, Jones paints a gruesome picture.

In THE RETREAT, Michael Jones, acclaimed author of LENINGRAD, draws upon a mass of new eye-witness testimony from both . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

The thrilling history of the turning point of the Second World War, when Hitler's armies were halted on the Eastern Front At the moment of crisis in 1941 on the Eastern front, with the forces of Hitler massing on the outskirts of Moscow, the miraculous occurred: Moscow was saved. Yet this turning point was followed by a long retreat, in which Russian forces, inspired by old beliefs in the sacred motherland, pushed back German forces steeled by the vision of the ubermensch, the iron-willed fighter. Many of Russia's 27 million military and civilian deaths occurred in this desperate struggle. In THE RETREAT, Michael Jones, acclaimed author of LENINGRAD, draws upon a mass of new eye-witness testimony from both sides of the conflict to tell, with matchless vividness and comprehensiveness, of the crucial turning point of the Second World War - the moment when the armies of Hitler could go no further - and of the titanic and cruel struggle of two mighty empires.
  • LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
The fall of the Iron Curtain and the Soviet Union, and the subsequent release of archives and documents, has been a boon to military historians like Michael Jones. Jones has written several books on the Eastern Front, including my most recent read: The Retreat: Hitler's First Defeat.

The Retreat does not break any new ground in describing the Red Army turning back Hitler's armies at the gates of Moscow during the critical months of December 1941-February 1942, but where it stands out is the narrative method. Jones draws heavily from first-hand accounts in diaries, letters, unit histories, and interviews of soldiers and civilians people on both sides, crafting a very human perspective of events.

Of particular note for me was the number of very senior German officers who realized the Nazi's harsh treatment of Soviet prisoners was creating a human tragedy that would have severe consequences. We could argue whether these officers could or should have done more than simply report the situation -- prisoners were starved, beaten, diseased, overworked, and out-and-out murdered while held in ad-hoc camps with little protection from the harsh winter -- but the record at least shows they were aware and concerned.

Tens of thousands of Soviet prisoners died in German captivity, and the Red Army carefully ensured its soldiers were aware it was happening -- ensuring most Soviet soldiers would fight fanatically and with utter hatred for the Nazi invaders.

Common German soldiers were also aware of what was happening with prisoners, and more directly the civilian populace. There are several instances in The Retreat in which individual soldiers from both sides displayed humanity and compassion, including a spontaneous Christmas mass attended by combatants and civilians from both sides.

Of course these incidents are overshadowed by the brutality and no-holds-barred fighting which is the common -- and correctly held -- perception of warfare on the Eastern Front. Many German soldiers and senior officers shared Hitler's rampant racism and hate of the Soviet system, and their actions and words show this clearly. Still, it is refreshing to see the views of a few individuals change over the course of the book, as they come to grips with seeing the results of their actions.

My largest quibble with this book is the lack of photos in the Kindle edition. The author speaks in the preface of obtaining photos during interviews with participants, and the hardcover listing on Amazon.com indicates eight pages of photos, but evidently these were not deemed necessary for the eBook version.

I found The Retreat to be very interesting and I would recommend it to anyone interested in getting a ground-level look at action on the Eastern Front. It was a quick read, with Jones setting the stage by providing strategic updates on the situation before shifting to first-person accounts that added color and drama.
  • Ionzar
First, I should say that if I could have, I would have given this book 4 1/2 stars, rather than 4, because it is an excellent book for what it is, which is a collection of German-centric anecdotes from fall 41-spring 42 regarding the fighting around Moscow. The author includes numerous memorable accounts about the fighting during this period, as well the the suffering endured by both armies and civilians. Importantly, he doesn't seem to have a ideological agenda, and includes many interesting accounts regardless of whether it makes the Germans or Sov side look good or bad, competent or incompetent.

The only slight flaws in this book are:
1) while the author includes a limited number of accounts from the Sov side, the vast majority are from the German side. The quality of the German accounts generally makes up for this, but it would have made an excellent book even better to have used more Sov sources.

2) The author doesn't include quite enough about the "big picture." While the author gives a general description of what was going on with the overall front, I think he could have done a bit better at tying the individual accounts into the overall action.

That said, these "criticisms" are really quibbles--if you are interested in East Front action, you'll almost certainly greatly enjoy this book.
  • Xellerlu
I'm not going to repeat the points already made in the excellent 3-5 star reviews already posted; I largely agree with them.

I would offer that this book reminded me of Paul Carell's "Hitler Moves East", although much more balanced. It captured the initial enthusiasm felt by the troops for their belief in Hitler's crusade in the east, followed by growing doubts as Summer passed into Winter, the temperature dropped & Ivan showed no signs of collapse as the German Army was promised. What really jumped out at me were the atrocities committed by the regular German Army in 1941, often advertised as the excesses of the SS in other works. Granted there were honorable German soldiers & they are adequately portrayed in this book, but in large, the average German soldier didn't have the time, resources, and moral compass to behave with dignity in the east. Everything in Barbrossa/Typhoon was extreme. The volume of prisoners was extreme, the wear & tear on man & machine was extreme, the climate was extreme, the zeal of the defenders was extreme, and German resources were few. No food or shelter for the POWs, no winter clothing for the troops, no replacements for the excessive losses.

I give 4 out of 5 stars for a few technical faults. a) the claim that the T-34 was first encountered in Typhoon, and b) the lack of a decent map
  • September
I was looking for a diary of the hardships of the winter on the eastern front. I found descriptions of the suffering, along with the movement of the battles, as best could be expected because of the timing needed to be detailed. I pictured what it was like from the information interspersed between the time it took place and, what was happening. It had many accounts of what it was like to be there, to keep the reading smooth.
  • Adrietius
In The Retreat, Michael Jones has written that rare history book that gives both the bird's eye view of what is happening overall, as well as what's happening to people on the ground. Many similar books simply recite names and dates and unit movements and casualty rates and how a battle was fought. Other books focus on the people caught up in historical circumstances, with little or now attention to the larger picture. This approach makes for a full accounting, especially for his description of Operation Barbarrosa and how Hitler's decision to invade the Soviet Union impacted tens of millions of soldiers and civilians. If you want a very well conveyed idea about how the German advance was halted just short of Moscow, and you want a vivid impression of just what doing that meant, this is the book for you.