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Download The motion picture goes to war: The U.S. government film effort during World War I (Studies in cinema) eBook

by Larry Wayne Ward

Download The motion picture goes to war: The U.S. government film effort during World War I (Studies in cinema) eBook
ISBN:
083571683X
Author:
Larry Wayne Ward
Language:
English
Publisher:
UMI Research Press (1985)
Pages:
176 pages
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1276 kb
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1597 kb
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1828 kb
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Read by Larry Wayne Ward. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Motion Picture Goes To War: The U. S. Government Film Effort During World War I. by. Larry Wayne Ward.

Films of WarWar CinemaFilm as War PropagandaThe Legacy of the War on the CinemaFifty Years AfterReferences and Further Reading. The Motion Picture Goes to War: The . The American Newsreels, 1911–1967. Do you want to read the rest of this chapter? Request full-text. Citations (2). References (24). Official British Film Propaganda during the First World War. Nicholas Reeves.

Apart from a few notable works, such as Michael Isenberg's War on Film: The American Cinema and World War I (1981) and Larry Wayne Ward's The Motion Picture Goes to War: The United States Government Film Effort During World War I (1985), the subject has mainly been dealt.

Apart from a few notable works, such as Michael Isenberg's War on Film: The American Cinema and World War I (1981) and Larry Wayne Ward's The Motion Picture Goes to War: The United States Government Film Effort During World War I (1985), the subject has mainly been dealt with as part of more general studies, such as histories of. film or surveys of American culture. Certainly, there exists nothing comparable to the vast literature on the Second World War and film (on which one may consult Peter Rollins's extensive booklist in Film & History (vol. 27 : 96-107).

Larry Wayne Ward, The Motion Picture Goes to War: The . 68. Douglas Gomery and Clara Pafort-Overduin, Movie History: A Survey, 2nd ed.

Nations were new to cinema and its capability to spread and influence mass sentiment at the start of World War I. The early years of the war were experimental in regard to using films as a propaganda tool. The early years of the war were experimental in regard to using films as a propaganda tool, but eventually became a central instrument for what George Mosse has called the "nationalization of the masses" as nations learned to manipulate emotions to mobilize the people for a national cause against the imagined or real enemy.

In The Motion Picture Goes to War, Larry Wayne Ward discusses the . Marcia Landy's Fascism in Films is a well-documented study (1931-43) of Italian cinema under Mussolini's totalitarian dictatorship.

Before World War I, the German motion-picture audience drew broadly from different social classes, and the country was among the leaders in the construction of film theatres. But German film production lagged behind that of several other European countries, and Denmark’s film industry in particular played a more prominent role in German film exhibition than did many domestic companies. This dependence on imported films became a matter of concern among military leaders during the war, when a flood of effective anti-German propaganda films began to pour into Germany from the Allied countries

World War II was the best of times and the worst of times for the American film industry. Hollywood made significant on-screen advances during the war in both features and nonfiction films.

World War II was the best of times and the worst of times for the American film industry. It was a period of challenge and change, of anxiety and accomplishment, of intense focus on the task at hand and growing uncertainty about Hollywood's own long-term prospects once that task was completed. Within days of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt commissioned Hollywood to "emotionalize" the conflict and to mobilize public awareness and support by continuing to do what it did best-making and selling motion pictures, primarily feature films.

Larry Wayne Ward's The Motion Picture Goes to War: The . Government Film Effort During World War I (1985).

Two other quite useful studies for the subject of World War I films in general, Craig W. Campbell's Reel America and World War I: A Comprehensive Filmography and the History of Motion Pictures in the United States, 1914-1920 (1985) and Larry Wayne Ward's The Motion Picture Goes to War: The .

Book by Ward, Larry Wayne