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Overreached on All Sides book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Overreached on All Sides book. At the end of the Civil War, the . government recognized some. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Overreached on All Sides: Freedman's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868 (1991)]

Overreached on All Sides: Freedman's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868 (1991)]. Failure to mention the referendum outcome and to make note subsequently of the varying degrees of support for the Constitution of 1866 within the six counties under examination squanders an additional piece of comparative information on the nature of the local white constituencies during Presidential Reconstruction

book by William L. Richter. It established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands to foster adjustment to the new economic conditions

book by William L. It established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands to foster adjustment to the new economic conditions.

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, usually referred to as simply the Freedmen's Bureau, was an agency of the United States Department of War to "direct such issues of provisions, clothing, and fuel, as he may deem needfu.

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, usually referred to as simply the Freedmen's Bureau, was an agency of the United States Department of War to "direct such issues of provisions, clothing, and fuel, as he may deem needful for the immediate and temporary shelter and supply of destitute and suffering refugees and freedmen and their wives and children.

The Freedmen's readers represented the compromise reached between the groups wanting to educate African . 1953) Richter, William L. "Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868" 1991. Ransom, Roger L. "Conflict and Compromise".

The Freedmen's readers represented the compromise reached between the groups wanting to educate African Americans and the communities where these schools were located. These readers were written using forgiveness as a theme. African Americans were encouraged to forgive their former masters, understand the anger of their former masters, and live on good terms with them. Cambridge University Press.

The Freedmen's Bureau Bill, which created the Bureau, was initiated by President Abraham Lincoln and .

The Freedmen's Bureau Bill, which created the Bureau, was initiated by President Abraham Lincoln and intended to last for one year after the end of the war. Passed on March 3, 1865, by Congress to aid former slaves through education, health care, and employment, it became a key agency during Reconstruction, assisting freedmen (freed ex-slaves) in the South.

Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen’s Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868.

Crouch’s study was published in 1992 almost simultaneously with William Richter’s more extensive Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen’s Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868. Although much shorter than Richter’s study, The Freedman’s Bureau and Black Texans is broader in scope. It is an overview of the four Texas Freedman’s Bureau Administrators and a series of case studies at the Subdistrict and Agent level. Crouch makes a solid case that the Texas Bureau struggled to effectively assist Texas freedmen and women for reason well beyond the ability of its Administrators and their subordinates to address.

William Lee Richter, Overreached on all sides: the Freedmen's Bureau administrators in Texas, 1865-1868 (Texas A&M University Press, 1991). Barry A. Crouch, The Freedmen's Bureau and Black Texans (University of Texas Press, 2010).

Freedmen's Bureau agents at first complained that freedwomen were not working in the fields as they had . Richter, William L. Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-. Oubre, Claude F. Forty Acres and a Mule.

Freedmen's Bureau agents at first complained that freedwomen were not working in the fields as they had during slavery. They attempted to make freedwomen work by insisting that their husbands sign contracts obligating the whole family to work on cotton. The Bureau did allow some exceptions such as certain married women with employed husbands and some "worthy" women who had been widowed or abandoned and had large families of small children and thus could not work. Louisiana State University Press.

Abbott, Martin (1967) The Freedmen’s Bureau in South Carolina, 1865–1872. (1991) Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen’s Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865–1868. College Station: Texas A&M University Press. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. Beale, Howard K. (1930) The Critical Year: A Study of Andrew Johnson and Reconstruction. Riddleberger, Patrick W. (1979) 1866: The Critical Year Revisited. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.