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Download A Sense of History: The Best Writing from the Pages of American Heritage eBook

by American Heritage Dictionaries

Download A Sense of History: The Best Writing from the Pages of American Heritage eBook
ISBN:
0831713682
Author:
American Heritage Dictionaries
Language:
English
Publisher:
Smithmark Pub (January 1, 1996)
EPUB book:
1166 kb
FB2 book:
1676 kb
DJVU:
1827 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
829


New York : American Heritage Press ; Boston : Distributed by Houghton Mifflin. "The first rough draft of history", an interview with Benjamin C. Bradlee by Michael Gartner.

New York : American Heritage Press ; Boston : Distributed by Houghton Mifflin. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

For almost 50 years, American Heritage magazine has been telling America's story in articles that have come to represent the best of responsible popular history. The result-by turns stirring, moving, funny, evocative, horrifying-is a For almost 50 years, American Heritage magazine has been telling America's story in articles that have come to represent the best of responsible popular history

Its creation was spurred by the controversy over the perceived permissiveness of the Webster's Third New International Dictionary.

The Best Writing from the Pages of American Heritage. There's no description for this book yet. by American Heritage Dictionary. Published January 1996 by Smithmark Publishers.

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Frequently bought together.

The american heritage dictionary blog. Indo-European & Semitic Roots Appendices.

American Heritage is a magazine dedicated to covering the history of the United States of America for a mainstream readership. Until 2007, the magazine was published by Forbes. Since that time, Edwin S. Grosvenor has been its publisher.

The American Heritage Student Dictionary is the best book for students .

The American Heritage Student Dictionary is the best book for students 11 to 16 while Webster's New World Student's Dictionary suffers by comparison. The American Heritage Student Dictionary meets these criteria and more and is the best student dictionary around. There are 200+ sections on word history, almost 700 synonym studies, and more than 400 biographical entries among the nearly 50,000 entries. This dictionary is written for ages 10 to 14 (grades 5 to 9).

Another period of American history that you think would have become . One even calls it a ‘new approach to American history.

Another period of American history that you think would have become worn out in terms of how much we can say is the Civil War in this country. It is the most talked about and the most written about. There are more films about the Civil War than any other war. But there seems to be no end of interest in that period. I think that’s an important point to make.

Its main fare is, of course, idioms - groups of two or more words that together mean something different from the literal meaning of the individual words.

Its main fare is, of course, idioms - groups of two or more words that together mean something different from the literal meaning of the individual words

Contains some of the best writing from American Heritage magazine, bringing together an informal history of America with such chapters as "I Wish I'd Been There," and "How We Have Changed."
  • Tygolar
One of my favorite books of all time! This is history that we never learned in school. The stories are more than just names, places and dates; they provide background and personal, intimate details that history texts don't have room to cover. They give you more the flavor and character of the people and the times.
  • Cordabor
Last year I picked up this 1985 anthology of American Heritage articles for $1 at a local charity sale, attracted mostly by the fact that it included the library stamp of a personal enemy. I also thought it would be fun to walk down memory lane with articles from the magazine I enjoyed so much as a young teen. (In my mind’s eye, I can still walk into my junior high school library—itself now history—and pick up a hardback copy of American Heritage from the current periodical shelf.)

For months this more-than-800-page volume sat on my shelf until I began to dip into what I took to be the most interesting articles. Finally, I gave that up, went back to the beginning, and read everything in-between. My childhood memories were not rose-tinted; the quality of writing at American Heritage was very high indeed. This anthology includes authors who were at the top of their game about the time I began the serious study of history: Richard B. Morris, Clinton Rossiter, Perry Miller, Stephen B. Oats, Bruce Catton, B. H. Liddell Hart, David McCullough, Alfred Kazin, Gerald Carson, Robert L. Heilbroner, Henry Steele Commager, Bernard Weisberger, Barbara Tuchman, Francis Russell, Wallace Stegner, William Manchester, and Allan Nevins. In those days, the best could also write for everyman.

In my opinion, the four pieces that bookend the collection aren’t up to the quality of the rest; and there’s something wistful about reading articles, once profusely illustrated, with no illustrations at all. Still, this is a fine anthology, a great reminder of how gloriously history could be written before academics discovered race, class, and gender.
  • Cozius
Some years ago I got this book as part of a come-on to join a book club. I finally picked it up with a casual attitude but was quickly given an attitude adjustment. This book is an excellent collection of essays that read more like short stories. The subject matter is quite varied but they all concern US history either directly or indirectly. Many of the subjects concern famous people and/or events while others focus on the obscure people and events of our history. One of my favorites was a biographical sketch of L. Frank Baum in which I discovered that "The Wizard of Oz" was just one of many books about that magical land. Other essays were about inventions, weather phenomena, social issues, etc. All of the essays were well written by a wide assortment of historians. It really was like reading a collection of short stories that just happened to be informative as well as engrossing. I was reminded of this book when I saw a book club offering it as a selection. I thought it was out of print but I'm glad to see it's going to be available again. It certainly was pleasure to read.
  • Qus
Among the masses of great writing here is Thomas Fleming's definitive biographical article on Jersey City mayor and political boss Frank Hague. In addition to being an excellent historian, Fleming's father was a ward leader under Hague, so Fleming had access to a lot of inside stories. Due to Hague not leaving much of a paper trail, this may likely be the best bio we ever have on the man, though it's also worth tracking down Thomas Smith's THE POWERTICIANS.