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by Emily PRAGER

Download Clea and Zeus Divorce eBook
ISBN:
0394533461
Author:
Emily PRAGER
Language:
English
Publisher:
Vintage Contemporaries 1987 (1987)
EPUB book:
1218 kb
FB2 book:
1593 kb
DJVU:
1271 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
451


Clea and Zeus Divorce Hardcover – January 14, 1988. I think Emily Prager is often over-looked when we think of great contemporary female authors. I've read most of her books, and just recently finished Clea & Zeus.

Clea and Zeus Divorce Hardcover – January 14, 1988. by. Emily Prager (Author). At first, I'll admit, I had a hard time getting through the first chapter of the book because Prager sort of throws the reader into the lives of these two complex people. The book starts off on stage, basically, which is not a typical way to start a book - right in the middle of the action. Once you realize what's going on, then you, as the reader, can move on and just keep reading. And keep reading you will.

Clea and Zeus Divorce book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Clea and Zeus Divorce as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Together Clea and Zeus became a show business phenomenon, but. Prager grew up in Texas, Taiwan, and Greenwich Village, NY. She is a graduate of The Brearley School, Barnard College and has a Masters Degree in Applied Linguistics. Books by Emily Prager

Emily Prager is an American author and journalist. Prager starred in the daily TV soap opera The Edge of Night from 1968 to 1972. Clea and Zeus Divorce (1987). Roger Fishbite (1999).

Emily Prager is an American author and journalist. Prager grew up in Texas, Taiwan, and Greenwich Village, New York City Contents. Her also work appeared in Titters, A Book of Humor by Women.

I think Emily Prager is often over-looked when we think of great contemporary female authors

I think Emily Prager is often over-looked when we think of great contemporary female authors.

Clea & Zeus divorce. New York : Vintage Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Clea and Zeus Divorce. 1987) A novel by Emily Prager. A fable about love, fame, atomic fallout and erotic betrayal. Featuring the glamorous show business duo Clea, a juggler, dancer and acrobat and Zeus, ex-tobacco salesman turned dancer and acrobat. The author also wrote "A Visit from the Footbinder". Genre: General Fiction. Used availability for Emily Prager's Clea and Zeus Divorce.

Emily Prager grew up in Texas, Greenwich Vilage and the Far East

Emily Prager grew up in Texas, Greenwich Vilage and the Far East. She has been a Guardian columnist and is well know for her journalism and essays, as well as for her fiction which inlcudes A Visit From the Footbinder, Eve's Tattoo, Clea and Zeus Divorce and most recently Roger Fishbite. Vintage has also published a collection of her humorous writing, In the Missionary Position. Emily Prager currently writes humour and TV criticism for New York's Village Voice, and lives in New York with her daughter. Country of Publication.

Together Clea and Zeus became a show business phenomenon, but now they are divorcing-and they have decided to make their last television special a creative chronicle of their breakup. A cast of characters only Emily Prager could invent

Together Clea and Zeus became a show business phenomenon, but now they are divorcing-and they have decided to make their last television special a creative chronicle of their breakup. A cast of characters only Emily Prager could invent.

  • nailer
Ah, the 80s. The last days of the Cold War; people were still frightened of nuclear holocaust. An entire book could be creditably built around one woman's conviction that a 150 kiloton nuclear bomb will fall on Kennedy Airport on September 10 at 10 p.m. And a nuclear blast could be compared to the end of a marriage.
A lousy marriage. That is what Clea and Zeus have. They don't even like each other, but remain infatuated with each other for about 8 years. They recreate and embellish upon the events of their marriage in their nightclub act, which eventually evolves into a series of television specials. They become rich and famous by failing to distinguish between entertainment and their own lives. This is very, very funny stuff.
These two spectacularly attractive and talented people have no real friends except for their entourage, which consists of 8 Rhodesians colonials devoted to Zeus's protection, one black South African and one Chinese. Clea and Zeus are wildly narcissistic people, their own selves shattered by perverse childhood traumas involving their mothers. They live to perform and are essentially always on stage, barely existing when they are not.
The structure of this book is fascinating. The narrative is spliced up with flashbacks into the youths of Clea and Zeus and into the more recent events that have led up to their final performance and the end of their marriage. Emily Prager is not a showy writer. There are some postmodern tricks here: the confusion between the performances and real lives, the narrative disruption, the absurdity of some of the character's identities, the magic realism of their physical abilities. But there is a real story here and it is a sad and compelling one.
  • Nea
I think Emily Prager is often over-looked when we think of great contemporary female authors. I've read most of her books, and just recently finished Clea & Zeus. At first, I'll admit, I had a hard time getting through the first chapter of the book because Prager sort of throws the reader into the lives of these two complex people. The book starts off on stage, basically, which is not a typical way to start a book -- right in the middle of the action. Once you realize what's going on, then you, as the reader, can move on and just keep reading. And keep reading you will.
What I love the most about this book is the constant theme of nuclear war -- whether the [surprise] is going to drop or not, and whether Prager is going to even show us what happens at the end. In the middle of that theme, you also learn about Clea & Zeus, their entourage of friends (and a strange entourage at that), and see the complexity of a marriage; especially a marriage is just a show business world. Everything's pushed to the extremes of the ridiculous, but in a sense, that's how some people live their lives because it's available to them.
The ending -- wow. Very different from what I expected. It's one of the few times that I experienced an ending such as the one Prager gives us and wanted more. I usually take abrupt endings at face value and go on. I don't need more. But with this ending, I wanted more. I want a Clea & Zeus part two -- just because it was that good.
Definitely a great read.
  • Gunos
This book is one of the most creative pieces of fiction that I have read. It transports us into the life of the characters.