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Download Soviet Jewry in the census of 1970: An analysis of the preliminary results, (Background paper) eBook

by Ivor J Millman

Download Soviet Jewry in the census of 1970: An analysis of the preliminary results, (Background paper) eBook
ISBN:
0901113085
Author:
Ivor J Millman
Language:
English
Publisher:
Institute of Jewish Affairs (1971)
EPUB book:
1485 kb
FB2 book:
1997 kb
DJVU:
1168 kb
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4.8
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519


The results of the 2002 census show that Russia's population has not fallen as. .

The results of the 2002 census show that Russia's population has not fallen as precipitously as many predicted, declining from 147 million in 1989 to just over 145 million (Heleniak, 2003). Given the current demographic situation, it is highly unlikely that Russia will achieve positive population growth in the foreseeable future. This paper explores changes in the ethnic composition of Russia's 89 federal regions, which resulted from the dissolution of the Soviet Union, during the 1990s.

Comparisons are made to similar analyses using the 1980 and 1990 Censuses. A consistent finding is that recently arrived Soviet Jewish immigrants have lower levels of English proficiency and earnings than other immigrants, other variables being the same.

This paper uses a variety of census and survey data to develop the first systematic time series comparing the . 20th century concentration of American-bom Jews in the high income professional occupations

This paper uses a variety of census and survey data to develop the first systematic time series comparing the occupational distribution of adult male Jews and white non-Jews by nativity from 1890 to 1990. A shorter time series is presented for eamings. The decennial census has never asked religion. 20th century concentration of American-bom Jews in the high income professional occupations. The extent and nature of Jewish self-em ploy tnent also changed over the period, from small-scale managerial self-employment to professional self-employment.

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The Soviet Census held on January 6, 1937 was the most controversial of the censuses taken within the Union of.

The Soviet Census held on January 6, 1937 was the most controversial of the censuses taken within the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The census results were not published because the census showed much lower population figures than anticipated, although it still showed a population growth from the last census in 1926, from 147 million to 162 million people in 1937. YouTube Encyclopedic.

Mortality analysis is an important part of the demographic analysis of. census data. Using the tabulated census data released by census authority, this paper examines the quality of census data, calculates the mortality indicators of the 2000 population census, and analyses the levels and patterns of reported mortality in the last decade in China.

Extract from papers on Provincial Jewry in Victorian Britain . Papers prepared by Dr. (later Prof. Essentially, the Cambridge Group has made use of the original Census Enumerators' Books (the forms, that is, on which the Census Enumerators recorded information as they moved from house to house) as a means of reconstructing the general pattern of life and work in 19th century England. It is my experience that an analysis of the backgrounds of the combatants, based on information provided by the Census and extended from other sources, often reveals underlying differences of major significance.