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Download Discovering Ireland's Woodlands: A Guide to Forest Parks, Picnic Sites and Woodland Walks. eBook

by John (editor) McLouglin

Download Discovering Ireland's Woodlands: A Guide to Forest Parks, Picnic Sites and Woodland Walks. eBook
ISBN:
0951861212
Author:
John (editor) McLouglin
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dublin, Coillte Teoranta, 1992. (1992)
EPUB book:
1939 kb
FB2 book:
1633 kb
DJVU:
1106 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
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240


We care for a variety of woodland habitats including ancient and landscaped woodlands and tree-lined avenues. Sometimes the hustle and bustle of a busy life can be remedied by a good walk in the woodlands to lift your mood

We care for a variety of woodland habitats including ancient and landscaped woodlands and tree-lined avenues. These tranquil spaces are the perfect place to get closer to nature, particularly in autumn when they burst with colour and wildlife, and we have lots of woodland trails you can follow. Sometimes the hustle and bustle of a busy life can be remedied by a good walk in the woodlands to lift your mood. We’ve pulled together some woodland walks for you to stroll solo or with friends. Woodland walks near you: Stretch your legs and get out and about in Borrowdale, Cumbria National Trust Images, Paul Harris.

The book provides a comprehensive guide to 340 forests and woodlands open to the public throughout Ireland. Donal Magner writes with a rare insight about forests he has worked in and visited over the years as a forester and journalist. It is packed with information not only about forests and tree species, but their associated flora and fauna, history and heritage. Stopping by Woods is a celebration and record of this remarkable civic amenity. Thanks to those who helped create a woodland culture in Ireland, forestry is no longer the land use of last restort but a vibrant, wealth-creating rural.

From Scottish pine forests to lakeside woodlands, our guide to the best forests .

From Scottish pine forests to lakeside woodlands, our guide to the best forests and woodlands in the U. The Fourth Duke of Atholl Lord John Murray’s ambitious planting scheme would eventually include 120,000 larch and Scots pine. In time, Planter John, as he became known, was to plant over 15 million trees throughout his estates, many of which, today, create an unbridled display of golden glory during the months of September, October and November. Tay Forest Park is a fabled woodland of giant Douglas firs, fairy-tale bridges and an ancient oak. The park is home to some of Britain’s tallest trees, along with mysterious tales of legends and dragons.

Bellever Forest, Dartmoor National Park Bellever Forest. Coppices are a type of woodland where regularly cutting down the trees can help protect wildlife. Trees like Hazel are grown, then cut down to a stump. Woodlands have more biodiversity than any other habitat in Britain. Trees are home to a huge number of other plants, insects, fungi, mosses, lichens, birds and small animals, which all provide food for other animals higher up the food chain. Afterward, a number of long straight stems grow up from the stump, which are perfect to use as timber.

The Glenshelane Forest Walks, consists of one linear and three looped walks. Forestry roads, woodland tracks. Blue 2km: Green 3km: Red – 10km: purple - . 5km. Glenshelane consists of a long wooded glen. Car park, picnic site, river and forest walks. Brown earth overlying old red sandstone. Good walking shoes, Rain/Wind Jacket, Mobile phone, Fluids. Activities & Adventure. About Discover Ireland.

Portumna Forest Park covers almost 450 hectares of which the majority is dominated by coniferous woodland. Get your free guide to ireland’s best walks. It is a nature nerds paradise with ash, beech and silver birch dotted along the lakeside. Yew and juniper also appear. Animal species in the area include red squirrel, fallow deer, foxes, badgers and a white tailed sea eagle who nests there. There are four walking trails of varying distances in Portumna Forest Park. Plus download our free guide to the 50 best walks in Ireland! Download.

As you walk through a forest in Scotland remember to stop every so often an. .

Surely the best way to enjoy our woodlands is to live in them, if only for a holiday. You can become one of the woodland folk at Barend Holiday Village in Dalbeattie, and Forest Holidays in Strathyre and Ardgarten amongst many other secluded sanctuaries. The forest as wildlife sanctuary. As you walk through a forest in Scotland remember to stop every so often and be very, very quiet. If you stay still and get a little bit lucky, you may meet some of the wonderful creatures who call the woods you are visiting home.

Ensuring forests and woodlands are sustainably managed. Expanding the area of forests and woodlands, recognising wider land-use objectives. Improving efficiency and productivity, and developing markets. Increasing the adaptability and resilience of forests and woodlands. Enhancing the environmental benefits provided by forests and woodlands. Engaging more people, communities and businesses in the creation, management and use of forests and woodlands.

Tollymore Forest Park was the first state forest park in Northern Ireland, established on 2 June 1955. It is located at Bryansford, near the town of Newcastle in the Mourne and Slieve Croob Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Tollymore Forest Park was the first state forest park in Northern Ireland, established on 2 June 1955. It is located at Bryansford, near the town of Newcastle in the Mourne and Slieve Croob Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It covers an area of 630 hectares (1,600 acres) at the foot of the Mourne Mountains and has views of the surrounding mountains and the sea at nearby Newcastle. The Shimna River flows through the park where it is crossed by 16 bridges, the earliest dating to 1726.

McLouglin, John (editor) Discovering Ireland's Woodlands: A Guide to Forest Parks, Picnic Sites and Woodland Walks. Dublin, Coillte Teoranta, 1992. 14.5 cm x 21 cm. 102 pages. Original softcover. Very good condition with signs of external wear. Damp-marks on lower half of booklet. Pages clean with solid binding. Includes for example the following essays: Carlow / Cavan / Cork / Kerry / Sligo / Wicklow etc.