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Download A Blacksmith's Craft: The Legacy of Francis Whitaker (Volume 1) eBook

by George F. Dixon

Download A Blacksmith's Craft:  The Legacy of Francis Whitaker (Volume 1) eBook
ISBN:
0970766475
Author:
George F. Dixon
Language:
English
Publisher:
Blue Moon Press; first Edition edition (November 9, 2004)
Pages:
145 pages
EPUB book:
1317 kb
FB2 book:
1847 kb
DJVU:
1153 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
860


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A Blacksmith's Craft book. A Blacksmith's Craft:. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Front Cover Blacksmith's Cookbook, The: Recipes in Iron by Francis Whitaker New reprint with index! This book is the result of ten years of workshops.

2004) A Blacksmith's Craft: The Legacy of Francis Whitaker. Dixon, George F (2004). A blacksmith's craft: the legacy of Francis Whitaker. Volume 1 Volume 1. Huntingdon, Pa.

2004) A Blacksmith's Craft: The Legacy of Francis Whitaker References. "NEA National Heritage Fellowships: Francis Whitaker". National Endowment for the Arts. Retrieved 13 November 2017. Govenar, Alan (2001). Francis Whitaker: Anglo-American Blacksmith and Ornamental Ironworker". Masters of Traditional Arts: A Biographical Dictionary. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio. Huntingdon, P. Blue Moon Press.

Crafts Crafts & Hobbies Crafts & Hobbies.

Like New Book, Volume 1, No Markings. Published by Blue Moon Press (2004). Seller Inventory 039768. ISBN 10: 0970766475 ISBN 13: 9780970766472.

In 1987 Francis Whitaker wrote his first book, The Blacksmith’s . The exhibition includes the tools of a blacksmith shop, complete with forge and anvil

In 1987 Francis Whitaker wrote his first book, The Blacksmith’s Cookbook. It quickly became an important reference source for blacksmith’s around the world. George Dixon was designated the main contributor because of his skills as writer and illustrator. Francis wrote: I have always had the greatest respect for George and his untiring efforts to preserve the art of blacksmithing. 1999) The gathering and organizing of material, photo and Francisisms fell to Judy Berger and Tal Harris. The exhibition includes the tools of a blacksmith shop, complete with forge and anvil. Cyril Colnik, Man of Iron is the first book to document this metalsmith’s masterworks.

George Dixon was designated the main contributor because of his skills a. .

Volume II will be released in 2007. The following description of the book and introduction are taken from A Blacksmith’s Craft, The Legacy of Francis Whitaker, Volume I. /ppbThe Birth of a Book /b/ppIn 1987 Francis Whitaker wrote his first book, The Blacksmith’s Cookbook.

Book List ABANA Chapter Newsletters Tips And Ideas ABANA A Blacksmithing Primer Randy McDaniel A Blacksmiths Craft The Legacy Of Francis Whitaker George Dixon Art Forms In The Plant World Karl Blossfeldt Art Out Of Fire Ingolf Eschenbach Anvils In America Richard.

Book List ABANA Chapter Newsletters Tips And Ideas ABANA A Blacksmithing Primer Randy McDaniel A Blacksmiths Craft The Legacy Of Francis Whitaker George Dixon Art Forms In The Plant World Karl Blossfeldt Art Out Of Fire Ingolf Eschenbach Anvils In America Richard Postman Art Of The Knife Joe Kertzman Advanced Blacksmithing: A Training Manual Manual BAM Newletters Volume 1 BAM BAM Newletters Volume

A Blacksmith’s Craft The Legacy Of Francis Whitaker(2) George Dixon.

A Blacksmith’s Craft The Legacy Of Francis Whitaker(2) George Dixon. Peter Parkinson Alex W. Bealer Simpson Bolland Max Metzger Lorelei Sims Francis Whitaker Francis Whitaker Charles McRaven David Harries James Fleming Don Plummer R. Hughes & M. Rowe Jim Hrisoulas A. Lungwitz & C. Adams Tim McCreight Alexander G. Weygers Dona Z. Meilach Jack Lewis & Roger Combs Henry Jonas Magaziner Ryan Ridgway Jinks McGrath J. M. Camp & C. B. Francis Patrick McNaughton Jim Hrisoulas Mark.

In 1987 Francis Whitaker wrote his first book, The Blacksmith’s Cookbook. As the supply of this small, red book dwindled even though the demand for it continued, Francis decided that rather than reprinting the original text, he would revise and expand it into a compendium that would preserve techniques and processes for blacksmiths of all levels. This would be no small undertaking at the age of 90-plus years. A Blacksmith's Craft is a compendium for blacksmiths at any level to preserve techniques and processes essential for the mastery of all levels of traditional blacksmithing.

A Blacksmith's Craft is a compendium for blacksmiths at any level to preserve techniques and processes essential for the mastery of all levels of traditional blacksmithing. The beautiful illustrations and clearly demonstrated techniques make this the book to become the standard by which all others will be measured,
  • Viashal
Good reading for anyone interested in blacksmithing .Well written and illustrated. Lots of good information for new and experienced blacksmiths alike.
  • Jazu
This is a great blacksmithing book. It is a compilation of the methods of Francis Whitaker, but written by George Dixon. I have a fairly good sized library of all the best blacksmithing, welding, machining, and artist-metal worker books, and this is definitely good addition to it. Now, I can be a little bit long-winded, but I want you to understand my perspective here, and when it comes to more obscure knowledge and books, I think that that can be a good thing, because the usual reviews like "great book, 5 stars" don't cut it when it comes to a great author, a great book, and one that most people looking for blacksmithing books on Amazon won't even see come up in the results, much less know to look for this title on here.

Due to the revived interest in blacksmithing, old style woodworking, and the self sufficiency/survival movement, there seems to have been a new wave (or maybe bombardment) of blacksmithing books. Many seem good intentioned; aimed at helping those totally new to blacksmithing get started or to encourage the interested to make the jump and buy that old anvil, hammer, and whatever they can come up with for a forge or torch. The problem, in my experience, with this new wave of books, is that the author's have basic knowledge, based off of a few years of playing around in their shed and maybe the addition of what they learned at a workshop or two. Some truly wish to teach the little that they know to other newbies and some just are cashing in on the latest trend by writing a how-to book about something they have only done for 2 years "just in case the world falls apart".

I find those books to be aggravating. There only needs to be a couple of them out there. Ok, short books, to get a person started and maybe not overwhelm those with a short attention span. But, instead we have 100 of those books for every 1 book by a LEGITIMATE master blacksmith, like Dixon. Smiths/Authors like Whitaker, Percy Blandford, Mark Aspery, Weygers, Donald Streeter, and Lars Enander are what aspiring blacksmiths and experienced ones alike should be adding to their libraries. They are essential reading and each has their own way of doing things. No smith knows it all and the many, many years of experience of lifelong smiths like these compliment each other to truly give those willing to read and apply a huge knowledge store to tap into and help them advance rapidly, assuming they are putting in their time on the anvil. This, in contrast to the dozens of books by backyard hobbyists that normally come up with an Amazon "blacksmithing book" search, that just regurgitate the same 2-day renaissance fair demonstration info over and over. Save your money and buy real blacksmith books like this one...the ones you only see on blacksmith tool websites and hear about on forums.

Now the book: The author's first books was the one called something like "blacksmith cookbook", it had a lot of great stuff in it, but was aimed at experienced blacksmiths. This book was intended to replace that one. It was intended to have the best chapters of the "Cookbook", but also all the basic knowledge and tips for newer blacksmiths that Dixon would have liked to teach you if you were his student. He wanted this book to be a piece of his legacy, something to pass on, since he passed on around the time the book was published. There was supposed to be a second volume, which we all have been eagerly waiting for, but after several years now, I have not heard anything about it or if it was even in the works.

The book covers these topics:
Ch 1 The Blackmith's Shop - Safety, what you need, arrangement, IN DEPTH LOOK AT TOOLS and what his opinions are on prioritizing what to get and what you can do with them...or if they are really even necessary.
Ch 2 Blacksmithing Processes - All the basic methods of how he does things
Ch 3 Making Hammers, Tongs, & Tools - self explanatory
Ch 4 Joinery
Ch 5 Forging Blanks & Balls
Ch 6 The Twisted Bar
Ch 7 Scrolls
Ch 8 Quatrefoils
Ch 9 Animal Heads - His style of making heads. I would also suggest Bill Epps' dvd, though he has his own style, to better visualize the process.
Ch 10 Mechanics of Basic Design & Drawing. This is a good chapter, and very unique amongst blacksmith books. Being able to plan and draw what you want to do is essential for any smith or artist, but is usually ignored in other books.
Ch 11 Surface Textures, Finishes, & Finishing
Index

Francis Whitaker and the author Dixon, cover it all. True this isn't a huge book, not like Blandford's or Aspery's books, but it is *crammed* full of information, no pages are wasted, like many of the popular books, on how joyful blacksmithing is, and self-glorifying pictures of authors swinging hammers with just the right amount of smoke and light gleaming off the hammer. It's all business, all about teaching you what you need to know, and a lot of good, unique knowledge.

RIP Francis Whitaker, we appreciate this work, and Dixon's great efforts in presenting it in a way that I don't doubt would make Francis proud.
6 stars. Buy it....whether here or Artisan Ideas.
  • Olelifan
A comprehensive reference book for any blacksmith. This is a revised version of “The Blacksmith’s Cookbook” authorized by Francis Whitaker. I have a lot of books on Blacksmithing, but if I could only have one or recommend a first book, this would be the one. Well illustrated with detailed descriptions of tools, techniques and projects. Worth every penny!