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by 1961- Arnaldur Indriason

Download Outrage. Arnaldur Indridason eBook
ISBN:
1846555507
Author:
1961- Arnaldur Indriason
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvill Press (June 1, 2011)
EPUB book:
1108 kb
FB2 book:
1798 kb
DJVU:
1332 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
523


Arnaldur Indriðason (pronounced ; born 8 January 1961) is an Icelandic writer of crime fiction; most of his books feature the protagonist Detective Erlendur. Arnaldur was born in Reykjavík on 8 January 1961, the son of writer.

Arnaldur Indriðason (pronounced ; born 8 January 1961) is an Icelandic writer of crime fiction; most of his books feature the protagonist Detective Erlendur. Arnaldur was born in Reykjavík on 8 January 1961, the son of writer Indriði G. Þorsteinsson. He graduated with a degree in history from the University of Iceland (Háskóli Íslands) in 1996. He worked as a journalist for the newspaper Morgunblaðið from 1981 to 1982, and later as a freelance writer

Arnaldur Indridason worked for many years as a journalist and critic before he began writing novels.

Arnaldur Indridason worked for many years as a journalist and critic before he began writing novels. Outside Iceland, he is best known for his crime novels featuring Erlendur, Elinborg and Sigurdur Óli, which are consistent bestsellers across Europe. The series has won numerous awards, including the Nordic Glass Key and the CWA Gold Dagger. His most recent novel is Operation Napoleon. Also by. Arnaldur indridason. In english translation.

Arnaldur Indriðason was born in 1961. Key Award for Best Nordic Crime Novel for both Jar City and Silence of the Grave, and in 2005 Silence of the Grave also won the CWA Gold Dagger Award for best crime novel of the year. Indriðason lives in Iceland. NOTE: This page is run by Arnaldur Indriðason's US publishers (Picador and Minotaur).

Win a copy of Arnaldur Indridason's OUTRAGE (and four other books) in Picador Book Club's Halloween sweepstakes! . Arnaldur Indridason updated their cover photo.

Книга Outrage автора Индридасон Арнальд оценена посетителями КнигоГид, и её читательский рейтинг составил . 4 из 1. Читать онлайн "Outrage". Автор Индридасон Арнальд.

Онлайн библиотека КнигоГид непременно порадует читателей текстами иностранных и российских писателей, а также гигантским выбором классических и современных произведений. Все, что Вам необходимо - это найти по аннотации, названию или автору отвечающую Вашим требованиям.

When examining Icelandic Noir, it’s impossible to ignore Arnaldur Indridason books and the contribution he has made to the genre. Born in 1961 in Reykjavík, Indridason pursued a degree in history from the University of Iceland in 1996 and worked as a freelance writer before becoming a film critic for a local newspaper. Indridason’s books mostly feature the protagonist Detective Erlendur who he brought to life in 1997.

Indridason Arnaldur - скачать бесплатно все книги автора. Книги 1-9 из 9. Arctic Chill. Жанр: Детективы: прочее. On top of this national tragedy is the universal problem of bored, unsupervised youth, raised with no respect for authority and awash in fast food, rock music and violent computer games. Indridason has produced a stunning indictment of contemporary society. Читать книгу Скачать книгу Отзывы о книге (0). Bett?

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Menschens hne. Indridason Arnaldur. Download (PDF). Читать.

Flag as Inappropriate. Arnaldur was born in Reykjavík on 28 January 1961, the son of writer Indriði G. He worked as a journalist for the newspaper Morgunblaðið from 1981 to 1982, and later as a freelance writer.

Arnaldur Indridason, author of the Reykjavík Thrillers, was born in 1961. He won the Glass Key Award for Best Nordic Crime Novel for both Jar City and Silence of the Grave, and in 2005 Silence of the Grave also won the Crime Writers Gold Dagger Award for best crime novel of the year. Arnaldur Indridason, author of the Reykjavík Thrillers, was born in 1961.

  • Malara
This novel was written from the viewpoint of detective Elinborg, who is a background character in previous novels. Either due to unfamiliarity, or synergy, she doesn't quite grip me as do the male characters. Fleshing out characters in a separate novel could be an Author's indulgence, but it is no less a good read for loyal fans of Indridason and new readers may find Elinborg more personable and less depressive than the usual protagonist Erlendur. Certainly she approaches the crime differently and her home life, while fuller, is no less chaotic and suffering from her long hours away. The whole novel draws to a conclusion which is satisfactory, yet uncharacteristically incomplete from a justice sense. Many questions raised in this novel go completely unanswered; this is far more realistic of actual police work and no one reading Indriadason should be expecting to solve the case, win the love of the girl and get home with flowers for Christmas eve. These novels are darker, more introspective and realistically gritty, but always with a touch of hope breaking out against the bleak winter which I personally find deeply satisfying.
  • Gorisar
Like many readers I enjoy Detective Erlendur's exploits in the novels written by Amaldurm Indridason. He is a loner and we don't know much about him, but we do know he is an excellent detective. Now, we have a muder being led by Elinborg, a member of his team. In fact we get to know her as a person, and we see how her mind works. She has learned well from her master.

A young man is found with his throat slit and his mouth full of Rohypnol, the date rape drug,usually given to women. Upon further investigation, it is found that indeed a woman had been in the premises, and this murder investigation now takes a different turn. Elinborg turns out to be an excellent investigator. She knows her team well, leads them with expertise, and her intricate method of investigation turns up clues others may miss.

Elinborg has another life beside that of a detective. She has a happy life with her partner, and four children. We are led through her life, learn of a previous marriage, and her first meeting with Teddi, her partner. After her disastrous first marriage, they have decided not to go through the legalities of a marriage. Her children are growing, they love her, and respect her profession, but she is not home enough. Elinborg balances the difficult stress of her job with cooking. She has written a book on desserts, and she is in the process of writing another. At the moment, Elinborg is into Indian cooking, and her knowledge of this cooking brings a new clue within this murder.

Elinborg goes to the family home of the murdered man and finds only the mother, who, it seems, knows nothing about her son. The townspeople are very quiet, and only one young woman gives a sign that there is more to know. Elinborg finds herself in situations where it might be best to have a partner, but she shows no fear. Is this a good thing? Elinborg is relentless in her pursuit of the murderer, and her determination and skill bring her in good stead.

I like Elinborg, she has tried to balance her life, so that her children and partner play a big part. But, she also realizes her children are growing older and time is slipping away. She worries about them, and she wonders why she is still in this police work. There is a great deal of introspection on her part. The contrast between Erlendur's and Elinborg are quite apparent, one a loner, grumpy, with no life outsideof his work, the other a happy home life, with outside interests, and showing signs of growth and maturity.

Is this the end of Erlendur, and the beginning of a new series with Elinborg? It is difficult to tell, we only know Erlendur has not been seen in awhile. Whichever way the wind blows, I will follow.

Recommended. prisrob 09-01-13
  • Hra
While I don't disagree with the other reviewers here, I was drawn to another aspect of this book. As always, you can read Indridason's writing both as absorbing murder mystery and as commentary on Icelandic society, particularly the clash between tradition and modernity.
Detective Erlendur, who we can usually rely upon to rage against insipid modernity, is absent, except in so far as he has influenced Detective Elinborg over the years, and as a foreshadowed missing person in the next book. Yet despite Erlendur's absence, Indridason manages to get in some overt jabs at the nefarious influences of the modern world: for example, "mindless drivel such as American reality TV"; "I feel we shouldn't always be chucking out our history, and the traditional way of life and work"; a description of Elinborg's infinitely patient husband who "would often wax lyrical about the good old days of simple, innocent dance tunes, which had given way to raw, angry confrontational music"; date-rape drugs; and the internet blog where Elinborg's teenage son overshares about private family matters. [Yet Elinborg feels secure in the knowledge that by pressing a single button on her cell phone, her police colleagues will rush to assist her.] Without giving away too much, there is a victory of sorts for tradition here in an inevitably losing struggle with modernity.
The story is absorbing, and the translation by Anna Yates is good (though I prefer Victoria Cribb).
When I saw the title, Outrage, I was hoping for a mystery set in post-financial-meltdown Iceland, but the Icelandic-language version was published in 2008, before Iceland was slammed by the full force of the Outrageous deleveraging of its financial sector and the economic shock therapy that followed. I suspect the next book will include Indridason's take on that reckoning. I cannot wait.