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by Paul Samuelson,William Nordhaus

Download Economics with PowerWeb eBook
ISBN:
0072509147
Author:
Paul Samuelson,William Nordhaus
Category:
Business & Finance
Language:
English
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin; 17 edition (May 10, 2001)
EPUB book:
1649 kb
FB2 book:
1749 kb
DJVU:
1947 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
376


Macroeconomia – Samuelson & Nordhaus – 19ed. 454 Pages · 2010 · 2. 4 MB · 3,082 Downloads ·Spanish. Traducido de la decimonovena edición de Economics, by Paul A. Samuelson and William D. Nordhaus Economia. Macroeconomía con aplicaciones a Latinoamérica.

Macroeconomia – Samuelson & Nordhaus – 19ed. by Paul A. Samuelson. 04 MB·75 Downloads·Spanish. Economía de Samuelson-Nordhaus, han Macroecono. Macroeconomia Samuelson.

Greystone by Power Properties. PagesMediaBooks and cs Paul A Samuelson & William D Nordhaus. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español.

Samuelson's text was first published in 1948, and it immediately became the authority for the principles of economics courses. The book continues to be the standard-bearer for principles courses, and this revision continues to be a clear, accurate, and interesting introduction to modern economics principles. Bill Nordhaus is now the primary author of this text, and he has revised the book to be as current and relevant as ever.

Macroeconomics, 17e, by Samuelson and Nordhaus, is the classic text that set the standard for principles of economics texts when it was introduced in 1948

Macroeconomics, 17e, by Samuelson and Nordhaus, is the classic text that set the standard for principles of economics texts when it was introduced in 1948. This text has been the standard-bearer in principles books for over 50 years, presenting a clear,accurate, and interesting introduction to economics that allows students to study the world and see the patterns of economic life. Bill Nordhaus is now the primary author of this modern treatment of macroeconomics which has been thoroughly updated.

Economics by Paul A Samuelson, William D Nordhaus. The economics is clear.

Economics is an introductory textbook by American economists Paul Samuelson and William Nordhaus.

by William D. Nordhaus and Paul A. Microeconomics, 17e, by Samuelson and Nordhaus, is the classic text which set the standard for principles of economics texts when it was introduced in 1948. This text has been the standard-bearer in principles books for over 50 years, presenting a clear, accurate, and interesting introduction to economics that allows students to study the world and see patterns of economic life.

Paul Samuelson was the first American recipient of the Nobel Prize in economics. William D. Nordhaus is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University and a Director on the Resources for the Future Board. Born in Indiana, he did his undergraduate work at the University of Chicago and earned a P. at Harvard University, where he studied with Alvin Hansen. He taught for several decades at . Samuelson's first major work was Foundations of Economic Analysis (1947), a mathematical treatment of economic theory and principles. Later he made extensive contributions to professional journals in virtually all areas of economic theory.

Economics, 17e, by Samuelson and Nordhaus, is the classic text which set the standard for principles of economics texts when it was introduced in 1948. This text has been the standard-bearer in principles books for over 50 years, presenting a clear, accurate, and interesting indroduction to economics. Bill Nordhaus is now the primary author of this modern treatment of economics which has been thoroughly updated.
  • black coffe
By its nature (a text book) this is very boring. Although boring, the material is presented quite well. However, the text won't be of much help unless you have a good economics professor to help you out with some of the material. I don't know why I bought this book, we never used it in class. This book isn't the best source from which to learn economics. A live person can probably help you learn more, and it may well be cheaper than this overpriced book.
  • Brariel
It's really scarey to know this is the most widely used economics book in colleges. But actually, it's scarey to know economics is taught period. How do you teach a subject where none of the people gaining PhD status in the discipline can agree on anything?
  • Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
As I pursue my doctorate in mathematics education and look back over the textbooks I've read over many years of schooling, I'd have to say that Samuelson's Economics--required reading years ago when I took Freshman microecomics--has had the strongest long-term influence on my world view. Concepts like:
-the way competition works to make an efficient but not necessarily equitable economy,
-positive and negative externalities (i.e., the inefficiency caused when I benefit but you pay)
have been critical in helping me understand the currents behind modern political and economic debates.
You need some comfort with mathematics (algebra and graphing) in order to get the most benefit from this book--but certainly anyone who did well in Algebra 1 has a sufficient background.
I'd recommend this book strongly for anyone interested in developing a deeper understanding of human affairs and society.
  • MrRipper
I used an earlier version of this textbook in an Economics 201 class twenty years ago and couldn't believe how much I enjoyed it. The authors have a real sense of humor and can explain things in ways a layman can understand. I bought a copy of the text then, gave it to a family member who needed it, and have been seeking to replace it ever since.
  • X-MEN
When I was required to take econ as undergrad physics student and used this text, the professor made a big deal of econ students not understanding 'curves', by which assertion he implicitly meant the plotting of y=f(x) when f is smooth and invertible. Well the professor didn't understand 'curves' at a higher level: he failed to note that nearly all the 'curves' presented in the text were only 'cartoons', mere mental constructions not based on real data, and agreeing with no real data (excepting corn flakes sales in British supermarkets, if Paul Ormerod is correct). The idea of 'utility' is a useless fabrication that has no basis in empirical data. Those mental constructions represent instead the expectations of neo-classical economic theory, the religion of the IMF, World Bank, and a host of other neo-classically-educated economists. To be specific, the price-demand, price-supply 'curves' touted in the text do not exist in reality and also not in theory: e.g., see Osborne's book Finance and the Stock Market from a Physicist's Perspective for the explanation why. See also the economists' own proof that aggregate price-supply demand-suppy curves 'can be anything' even if individual supply-demand curves would behave as they expect! Furthermore, no real market is approximately in equilibrium, all real markets are examples of far from equilibrium systems. Unregulated free markets are unstable. None of this is hinted at in the text, where equilibrium and stability are implicitly and unfairly assumed without warning the unsuspecting reader. Worse, in the introductory chapter Samuelson uses a hokey, irrelevant pictorial argument to try to convince both himself and the reader that physics is as unscientific as neo-classical econ theory. For good information about econ theory, see the following books: Ormerod's The Death of Economics, Mirowski's More Heat than light, and Osborne's book. For those with enough intellectual stamina, there is also Giovanni Dosi's Innovation, Organization, and Economic Dynamics, a collection of essays that also points out that the emperor wears no clothes and tries to find a reliable ruler to replace His Uselessness. Instead of propagating misleading mythology it's now time for economists to face the facts and explain why, after convincing governments to follow their advice and deregulate, we face one big financial instability after the other: LTCM, Argentina, Enron, .... .
As text or as literature, this book is terribly written. Unsystematic, like a hodgepodge of review articles. Samuelson has noted that economists (like Galbraith) who write too well may be suspect by other economists, but this is an unfortunate viewpoint. The best writing is done by the clearest thinkers: Einstein (in both German and English), Feynman, V.I. Arnol'd, and Fischer Black are examples. Bad writing, in contrast, often reflects sloppy thinking. In short, this text could have been cut to half it's size, to the benefit of the reader who wants to understand what Samuelson has to say.
For the story of how neo-classical econ won out academically, see Mirowski's 'Machine Dreams'.
  • Hirah
Simply the best introductory economics book
  • Jay
This book is very famed in China.
The reader of the book is not college student but postgraduate.
The publisher in China have translated and published the textbook for above 4 times, The lasted one in 16th edition.
i am a editor.
who can help me that i want to know the top 10 or 20 business textbook in the world? it's including Economics?
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