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Download Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Approach to Building WebSphere Applications eBook

by Joey Bernal

Download Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Approach to Building WebSphere Applications eBook
ISBN:
0137129262
Author:
Joey Bernal
Category:
Computer Science
Language:
English
Publisher:
IBM Press; 1 edition (September 25, 2008)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1675 kb
FB2 book:
1876 kb
DJVU:
1480 kb
Other formats
rtf doc lrf lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
985


Architect IBM® WebSphere® Applications for Maximum Performance, Security, Flexibility, Usability, and Value . Bernal begins by illuminating the role of architecture and the responsibilities of the architect in WebSphere applications and SOA environments.

Architect IBM® WebSphere® Applications for Maximum Performance, Security, Flexibility, Usability, and Value Successful, high-value WebSphere applications begin with effective architecture. Now, one of IBM’s leading WebSphere and WebSphere Portal architects offers a hands-on, best-practice guide to every facet of defining, planning, and implementing WebSphere application architectures.

Application Architecture for Websphere book.

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Mobile version (beta). Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Approach to Building WebSphere Applications.

May 18, 2009 Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Chapter 1 Application Architecture This book is about building good application architectures. Before diving too far into the details of how to accomplish the goals of this book, it is - Selection from Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Approach to Building WebSphere Applications. Related with application architecture for websphere a practical approach to building websphere applications joey bernal.

Similar books to Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Approach to. .Architect IBM(R) WebSphere(R) Applications for Maximum Performance, Security, Flexibility, Usability, and Value Successful, high-value WebSphere applications begin with effective architecture.

Similar books to Application Architecture for WebSphere: A Practical Approach to Building WebSphere Applications (developerWorks Series). Kindle (5th Generation). Now, one of IBM's leading WebSphere and WebSphere Portal architects offers a hands-on, best-practice guide to every facet of defining, planning, and implementing WebSphere application architectures.

WebSphere Application Server V. provides two runtime profiles. Every WebSphere Application Server package includes both profile types. This book includes configuration and administration information for WebSphere Application Server V. and WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment V. on distributed platforms and WebSphere Application Server for IBM z/OS® V. This book has been updated with information about the new features in WebSphere Application Server V.

The Application Architecture for WebSphere to the book's content is like Advanced Computer Science to.

The Application Architecture for WebSphere to the book's content is like Advanced Computer Science to MS Word, Excel proficiency training.

Architect IBM® WebSphere® Applications for Maximum Performance, Security, Flexibility, Usability, and Value . Application Architecture for WebSphere : A Practical Approach to Building WebSphere Applications.

Architect IBM® WebSphere® Applications for Maximum Performance, Security, Flexibility, Usability, and Value Successful, high-value WebSphere applications begin with.

Architect IBM® WebSphere® Applications for Maximum Performance, Security, Flexibility, Usability, and Value Successful, high-value WebSphere applications begin with effective architecture. Now, one of IBM’s leading WebSphere and WebSphere Portal architects offers a hands-on, best-practice guide to every facet of defining, planning, and implementing WebSphere application architectures. Joey Bernal shows working architects and teams how to define layered architectural standards that can be used across the entire organization, improving application quality without compromising flexibility.

Bernal begins by illuminating the role of architecture and the responsibilities of the architect in WebSphere applications and SOA environments. Next, he introduces specific architectural techniques for addressing persistence, application performance, security, functionality, user interaction, and much more.

Bernal presents a series of sample architectures drawn from his work with several leading organizations, demonstrating how architectures can evolve to support new layers and changing business requirements. Throughout, his techniques are specific enough to address realistic enterprise challenges, while still sufficiently high-level to be useful in diverse and heterogeneous environments.

Coverage includes

• Choosing persistence frameworks that serve business requirements without excessive complexity

• Avoiding persistence-related problems with performance, security, or application functionality

• Designing and deploying effective middle layers and dependent libraries within WebSphere Application Server

• Using WebSphere mechanisms and architectural techniques to avoid common security attacks such as SQL injection

• Improving performance with WebSphere Application Server caching, including Distributed Maps and Servlet/JSP fragment caching

• Using presentation frameworks to provide fast, robust, and attractive user interaction

• Incorporating portals that provide a standardized framework for merging multiple applications

Joey Bernal is an Executive IT Specialist with IBM Software Services for Lotus. Senior Certified with IBM as an IT Specialist, he has an extensive background in designing and developing Web and Portal Applications. He often leads IBM teams that have assisted dozens of clients in leveraging WebSphere Portal to address architecture, design, and implementation challenges. A frequent speaker on WebSphere and portal topics, Bernal is coauthor of Programming Portlets, and hosts the developerWorks blog: WebSphere Portal in Action. Prior to joining IBM, he was Director of IT for an incentive and performance improvement company, and served as lead technical advisor and architect for high-profile Internet and intranet applications at several Fortune 500 companies. You can also visit the author’s Web site at www.bernal.net.

The IBM Press developerWorks® Series is a unique undertaking in which print books and the Web are mutually supportive. The publications in this series are complemented by resources on the developerWorks Web site on ibm.com®. Icons throughout the book alert the reader to these valuable resources.

  • Malogamand
Disclaimer: the book is not that bad per se, but what got me is the price..
The learning curve for a developer with experience is rather flat, knowledge to price ratio is one of the worst I've seen ( this is an informal metric ;)

Also, if the book had been titled *for dummies* or *executive summary*, I would not have been duped into buying it.
The *Application Architecture for WebSphere* to the book's content is like *Advanced Computer Science* to MS Word / Excel proficiency training.

A lot of the book's content is the recycled, tried-and-true basic common knowledge available from every corner of the Web: the importance of standards and conventions, issues of logging, tracing and error handling, review of persistence and WEB UI technologies, etc. However, in most cases the author fails to build on top of basic knowledge and provide some actionable advice or at least, some research-based comparison. Instead, for most cases he concludes with a generic statement like "The approach should be as simple as possible" (p. 42, Logging and Tracking), or "Aspects can play another role in instrumentation of code that can be very powerful" ( p. 51, Why Not Use Aspects ). The latter pearl of wisdom is the embodiment of the typical advice of the book: vague, inconclusive, lacking assertion of authority, i.e., I think this may be useful but you may have to figure for yourself.

Additionally, the book is bloated with truisms that take space but convey little useful information. Consider this on setting logging levels dynamically via WSAS Console: "This approach is invaluable when diagnosing a problem in a running environment where you suspect that a restart would mask the problem, or make it go away for a while" ( p. 49, Working With Logging and Tracing ). I wish, instead of this profound conclusion, the author had told me something else about WebSphere specifics related to logging, like limitations, configuring rotation, multiple servers configuration approach, scripting / programmatic approach, etc. Nope. All you have is a screenshot and two paragraphs of text, with the second paragraph devoted to praising this "invaluable approach".

Regarding WebSphere specifics level, consider this sentence: "I cannot stress enough that System.out messages are not to be tolerated within any code deployed to WebSphere Application server" ( p. 43, System.out ). Wow, that's really a WebSpere-specific advice.

The Persistence Matters, Chapter 3, may have been conceived as a high-level review of persistence frameworks. But at the very beginning it sounds like a lecture for teenage kids: "I want to warn against picking a framework because you think it is popular or because you want to learn it" ( p. 66, Type of Persistence Frameworks ). In the same paragraph: "Choosing a framework just because you think it is cool is not a good use of business dollars". I guess, this is very useful for the idiots who think otherwise. The next sentence spells even a greater wisdom, a real guideline: "Some diligence is necessary to ensure it is the right framework for the job and that it will serve the needs of the business without undue modification or too many complications". Wow. What can be more profound than this? Tell the people that stealing is bad and one should wash hands before meal? The rest of the Persistence chapter is devoted to describing iBATIS and EJB3 persistence. There is better reading on both subjects, so you may think it's tied to WSAS in some way? No, it is not. It's just out there making the book thicker.

so, long story short, I bought the book for full price and that's the reason I'm writing this caustic review. The book fails to deliver on details and substance of expected subject. I think, a fair price for this quality is up to $15.
  • Shomeshet
good
  • PanshyR
I am a Project Manager. I wanted to be up front about who I am so you can evaluate this review based on my job function. I have also been an analyst, an architect and a developer but this review is as a PM.

This is a great book! I found it easy to understand and easy to read. My current large project is a WebSphere project. I found as I was reading this book that I felt like I had a WebSphere application builders cheat sheet. My team was working on a future release and I was asking questions about standards, caching, single sign on, performance and many other topics based on what I was reading in Joey's book. He speaks the truth on every page. What is difficult is convincing those around me that they don't know as much as they think they know where WebSphere portal is concerned.

I feel that anyone who performs function that includes building WebSphere applications would truly benefit from this read. Joey does a great job of touching on all points to help you in getting off to a good start and keeping you on track.

Cover to cover, it was worth every penny!

PS - I have had the pleasure of working with Joey on a project. If you ever have the opportunity to work or even talk with him you will quickly realize that the words he put on paper in this book are written exactly as he speaks. He is pragmatic and does not mind letting you know his opinion (whether you like it or not). And I saw him prove time and time again that he knows what he's talking about, which makes the book even more valuable in my opinion.
  • black coffe
This review is way overdue, since 've read this book (specially chapter 2) more than once since it came out. As some of you may already know, Joey Bernal is a prolific author and speaker in the world of Application Architecture specifically for the WebSphere stack including WebSphere Portal. In this book, Application Architecture for WebSphere, Joey unleashes his expert knowledge, wit, and his so well used common-sense and pragmatism on the topic of Application Architecture. This book is a must-read for anyone involved in web application development, everyone in a team that does that type of work; developers, architects, analysts, and even project managers, as mentioned in a previous review here in Amazon.com.

Although the book is based on WebSphere Application Server, his approach and most of the content could easily apply to any application server, specially those in the Enterprise Java family. The first two chapters alone (Application Architecture and Development Standards) are worth the price of the book, not to mention chapters 3-5 where he walks the reader through the most important topics and current technologies available in the Java Enterprise Edition world and provides with plenty of practical examples on what to do with confronted with issues on your design. Joey is a very known expert on WebSphere Portal and his chapter here is a great encapsulation of what is needed to know when using such a development framework while using the WebSphere software stack.

If you have not read this book and you do work in this area of web application development I urge you to get it and read it ASAP. I'm sure you will thank me later for this free advice and I'm sure you will end up recommending this books to friends alike.