almediah.fr
» » Lincoln in American Memory

Download Lincoln in American Memory eBook

by Merrill D. Peterson

Download Lincoln in American Memory eBook
ISBN:
0195065700
Author:
Merrill D. Peterson
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (April 21, 1994)
Pages:
496 pages
EPUB book:
1592 kb
FB2 book:
1811 kb
DJVU:
1700 kb
Other formats
mbr txt mobi azw
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
667


In Lincoln in American Memory, historian Merrill Peterson provides a fascinating history of Lincoln's place in the American imagination from the hour of his death to the present

In Lincoln in American Memory, historian Merrill Peterson provides a fascinating history of Lincoln's place in the American imagination from the hour of his death to the present.

Электронная книга "Lincoln in American Memory", Merrill D. Peterson

Электронная книга "Lincoln in American Memory", Merrill D. Peterson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Lincoln in American Memory" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Peterson's Lincoln in American Memory is an utterly fascinating work, some of it familiar but for the most part richly fresh in detail and highly revealing about the spontaneous and deeply felt creation of a truly democratic hero

Peterson's Lincoln in American Memory is an utterly fascinating work, some of it familiar but for the most part richly fresh in detail and highly revealing about the spontaneous and deeply felt creation of a truly democratic hero. Peterson's book is a particular achievement because of the vastness of the materials he has mastered, ranging from serious scholarship to elusive ephemera. Lincoln in American Memory is inspiring because the knowledge that political malice and pettiness can be surmounted gives us cause to be hopeful that such lessons of the past will be re-enacted.

Merrill Daniel Peterson (31 March 1921 – 23 September 2009) was a history professor at the University of Virginia and the . His 1994 Lincoln in American Memory, was written from a similar stance as his first book on Jefferson. It was a finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for biography.

Peterson wrote several books on Jefferson, including The Jefferson Image in the American Mind (Oxford University Press, 1960; reprinted with new foreword, University Press of Virginia, 1998), and Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation (Oxford University Press, 1970).

Peterson Merrill D. (EN). Lincolns death, like his life, was an event of epic proportions. When the president was struck down at his moment of triumph, writes Merrill Peterson, sorrow swept the nation

Peterson Merrill D. When the president was struck down at his moment of triumph, writes Merrill Peterson, sorrow swept the nation. After lying in state in Washington, Lincolns body was carried by a special funeral train to Springfield, Illinois, stopping in major cities along the way; perhaps a million people viewed the remains as memorial orations rang out and the world chorused its sincere condolences. It was the apotheosis of the martyred President-the beginning of the transformation of a man into.

Lincoln in American Memory book. When the president was struck down at his moment of triumph, writes Merrill Peterson, e sorrow" swept the nation

Lincoln in American Memory book. When the president was struck down at his moment of triumph, writes Merrill Peterson, e sorrow" swept the nation. After lying in state in Washington, Lincoln's body was carried by a special funeral train to Springfield, Illinois, stopping in major cities along the way; perhaps a million Lincoln's death, like his life, was an event of epic proportions.

Merrill D. Peterson, a renowned Jefferson scholar, enters the field of Lincoln studies with this book on how Lincoln has been remembered, memorialized and celebrated in the years since his death. Peterson examines an interesting variety of sources, including statues and prints made of Lincoln over the years in addition to the numerous biographies written. Among the images examined are the Emancipator, the martyr, and Savior of the Union. Peterson examines the origins of these images and how they have carried through the generations by historians and others. Peterson, author of Lincoln in American Memory, examines an interesting variety of sources, including statues and prints made of Lincoln over the years in addition to the numerous biographie. how more conten. hroughout his political career, Lincoln advocated th. . hroughout his political career, Lincoln advocated the supremacy of the national government, and upheld the Constitution as an instrument for realizing the promises of the Declaration of Independence, most importantly the equality of al men (Peterson 156).

Lincoln's death, like his life, was an event of epic proportions. When the president was struck down at his moment of triumph, writes Merrill Peterson, "sorrow--indescribable sorrow" swept the nation. After lying in state in Washington, Lincoln's body was carried by a special funeral train to Springfield, Illinois, stopping in major cities along the way; perhaps a million people viewed the remains as memorial orations rang out and the world chorused its sincere condolences. It was the apotheosis of the martyred President--the beginning of the transformation of a man into a mythic hero. In Lincoln in American Memory, historian Merrill Peterson provides a fascinating history of Lincoln's place in the American imagination from the hour of his death to the present. In tracing the changing image of Lincoln through time, this wide-ranging account offers insight into the evolution and struggles of American politics and society--and into the character of Lincoln himself. Westerners, Easterners, even Southerners were caught up in the idealization of the late President, reshaping his memory and laying claim to his mantle, as his widow, son, memorial builders, and memorabilia collectors fought over his visible legacy. Peterson also looks at the complex responses of blacks to the memory of Lincoln, as they moved from exultation at the end of slavery to the harsh reality of free life amid deep poverty and segregation; at more than one memorial event for the great emancipator, the author notes, blacks were excluded. He makes an engaging examination of the flood of reminiscences and biographies, from Lincoln's old law partner William H. Herndon to Carl Sandburg and beyond. Serious historians were late in coming to the topic; for decades the myth-makers sought to shape the image of the hero President to suit their own agendas. He was made a voice of prohibition, a saloon-keeper, an infidel, a devout Christian, the first Bull Moose Progressive, a military blunderer and (after the First World War) a military genius, a white supremacist (according to D.W. Griffith and other Southern admirers), and a touchstone for the civil rights movement. Through it all, Peterson traces five principal images of Lincoln: the savior of the Union, the great emancipator, man of the people, first American, and self-made man. In identifying these archtypes, he tells us much not only of Lincoln but of our own identity as a people. More than thirty years ago, Peterson won the prestigious Bancroft Prize for The Jefferson Image in the American Mind. The New York Times Book Review hailed it as "an engrossing story of the uses and abuses of a great legend," saying that Peterson's writing is often "brilliant." This absorbing book follows in the footsteps of that landmark work, leading us on a revealing tour through our changing image of our greatest president--and our changing image of ourselves.
  • Ytli
Very interesting book, not so much a bio of Lincoln, but a history of the myth and image of Lincoln. Starting from the bio's directly after his death to current times. Over 16,000 books and articles have been written about Lincoln. Every aspect of his life has been combed over and still, the business of Lincoln is booming. There were different periods of the Lincoln studies. The first due to the sadness of his death and what it meant. The Blacks worshipped him for freeing them from slavery. The Southerners hated him. In the 1890's there was a shift to the man, the war effort and who was this Ann Rutledge? In the 1920's there was a movement to show he was the bastard son--but who was the father? John C. Calhoun was rumored as was the son of John Marshall. After the 20's to the 60's there was a movement to psycho analyze him. Starting with Malcolm X, there was a major shift among the Blacks to either hate Lincoln or discredit him (why did he wait until January 1, 1863 to emancipate?). Then in the 70's, the novelists got involved. From Gore Vidal to Lincoln the Vampire Slayer. 16,000 books compared to 4 for Millard Fillmore.
  • GEL
Merrill D. Peterson, a renowned Jefferson scholar, enters the field of Lincoln studies with this book on how Lincoln has been remembered, memorialized and celebrated in the years since his death. Peterson examines an interesting variety of sources, including statues and prints made of Lincoln over the years in addition to the numerous biographies written. Among the images examined are the Emancipator, the martyr, and Savior of the Union. Peterson examines the origins of these images and how they have carried through the generations by historians and others.
  • Fato
This fascinating volume considers how Lincoln has been viewed from the time of his death to the time this work came out. The account of the historical research related to Lincoln's genealogy and his early life is particularly intriguing. It discusses some of the Lincoln literature and indicates what is worth reading. For instance, he downgrades Otto Eisenschiml's sensational Why Was Lincoln Murdered?, which made such a splash when it came out in 1937, and recommends The Lincoln Murder Conspiracies, by William Hanchett as the best book on the assassination and its historiography. This was the best book I read in the year when I read it, a year in which I read 126 books.
  • Blackstalker
This was a good book about the way we Americans remember Lincoln, even though some of our thoughts are not reall factual. It was worth the read to get back tosome of the truths.

J. Robert Ewbank author "John Wesley, Natural Man, and the 'Isms'"