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Download The Same Sea eBook

by Nicholas De Lange,Amos Oz

Download The Same Sea eBook
ISBN:
0156013126
Author:
Nicholas De Lange,Amos Oz
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mariner Books; First edition (October 1, 2002)
Pages:
216 pages
EPUB book:
1518 kb
FB2 book:
1679 kb
DJVU:
1172 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
794


The Same Sea is Amos Oz's most adventurous and inventive novel, the book by which he would like to be remembered. The cast of characters ranges from a prodigal son to a widowed father who has taken in his son's enticing young girlfriend, who in turn sleeps with her boyfriend's close friend.

The Same Sea is Amos Oz's most adventurous and inventive novel, the book by which he would like to be remembered. The author himself receives phone calls from his characters, criticizing the way he portrays them in his novel.

in collaboration with the author. Harcourt, inc. San Diego New York London

in collaboration with the author. San Diego New York London. No part of this publication may be reproduced or.

Nicholas de Lange (Translator). The Same Sea is Amos Oz’s most adventurous and inventive book, a novel of lyrical beauty and narrative power. We meet the middle-aged Albert; his wife, whom he has lost to cancer; his prodigal son, who wanders the mountains of Tibet hoping to find/ The- In a world full of hype, noise, and confusion, the simple lucidity of The Same Sea is totally unexpected.

Nicholas Robert Michael de Lange (7 August 1944, Nottingham) is Professor of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at the University of Cambridge. Nicholas de Lange is an emeritus fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge. Yehoshua into English. In November 2007, he received the Risa Domb/Porjes Prize for Translation from the Hebrew for his translation of A Tale of Love and Darkness by Amos Oz.

The Same Sea by Mr Amos Oz (Paperback, 2002). The Same Sea by Mr Amos Oz (Paperback, 2002) . Brand new: lowest price . The Same Sea (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW.

by Amos Oz. A father and son need to come to terms with the death of their . A father and son need to come to terms with the death of their wife/mother and how this will affect all their other relationships. Before attempting this book you need to know that this is a novel mainly written in verse and very Jewish/Israeli. If this appeals, then do go into Oz's world - it is quirky, sexy and ultimately life-affirming. Plus the writing is beautiful in this translation - Nicholas de Lange should get every medal going. Find similar books Profile.

The Same Sea is Amos Oz's most adventurous and inventive book, a novel of lyrical beauty and narrative power and the book by which he would like to be remembered. We meet the middle-aged Albert; his wife, whom he has lost to cancer; his prodigal son, who wanders the mountains of Tibet hoping to find himself; and his son's enticing young girlfriend, with whom Albert becomes infatuated and who in turn sleeps with her boyfriend's close friend.

The same sea. by. Oz, Amos; De Lange, N. R. M. (Nicholas Robert Michael), 1944 . Books for People with Print Disabilities. (Nicholas Robert Michael), 1944-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on April 9, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Nicholas de Lange, Oz's distinguished translator, steers these virtuoso transitions between debate and domesticity with . Amos Oz was born in 1939 and carved out an extraordinary body of short stories, novels and essays focussing on the contemporary Israeli experience.

Nicholas de Lange, Oz's distinguished translator, steers these virtuoso transitions between debate and domesticity with unerring skill. Oz can imagine, and inhabit, treachery of every stripe. But he keeps faith with the art of fiction. Visit the Amos Oz author page.

The Same Sea is Amos Oz's most adventurous and inventive novel, the book by which he would like to be remembered. The cast of characters ranges from a prodigal son to a widowed father who has taken in his son's enticing young girlfriend, who in turn sleeps with her boyfriend's close friend. The author himself receives phone calls from his characters, criticizing the way he portrays them in his novel. In this human profusion there is chaos and order, love and eroticism, loyalty and betrayal, and ultimately an extraordinary energy."I wrote this book with everything I have. Language, music, structure--everything that I have. . . . This is the closest book I've written. Close to me, close to what I always wanted. . . . I went as far as I could."--Amos Oz
  • Vizuru
A work of poetry that does more for the human soul as the book goes along. Speaks to our familial instincts, our lover's instincts, and our friendship instincts. The dark, the good, but most of all the complex.
  • Syleazahad
Cleverly written as a series of poems. I love this book. I had read a library copy and had to have one of my own so I can highlight phrases and earmark pages.
  • Zolorn
Bought it as a gift, The recipient loved it.
  • Alsalar
After the Tale of Love and Darkness I expected something more, but it is an interesting and touching story to read. The stile is a bit hard to get used to but after the middle it was really okey. If only Bat Yam would be a nice place even now as it is described in the book...
  • Grotilar
Truly brilliant, beautifully written, full of thought. I frequently had I put it down an take a moment out of amazement. Its worth multiple reads.
  • Malaris
Comforting book to relax before bedtime.
  • Mariwyn
This 200-page 1988 book, perfectly translated from the Hebrew original to English in 2001, is by one of Israel’s top novelists. It is about a sixty-something widower, Albert, who is comforted by his old friend a sixty-something woman, Bettine. He is trying to put his life back together. He is troubled by his loss of his wife and his attraction to Bettine. He is bothered by the absence of his son Enrico who has gone to Tibet to find himself. Enrico left behind his girlfriend Dita who lives for a time in Albert’s house because she has no other place to live. Albert is attracted to her despite Dita being much too young for him. In Enrico’s absence, Dita has an affair with a disreputable film producer, who is cheating Dita out of lots of money.

Oz is an exemplary novelist who is able to make common everyday events interesting. His book combines normal prose and free-flowing poetry, and, surprisingly, Oz himself appears in the novel, sometimes talking with his characters. Occasionally time shifts in the novel and we hear what occurred in the past, such as Albert’s courtship with his now dead wife, Bettine’s sex life with he now dead husband, and Albert’s son’s relationship with the lovely girl he abandoned when he went in search of himself and found a whore.

Beside the story, Oz’s language is a pleasure to read. Describing a sexual act, for example, Oz writes: “She was always on her back, her nightdress rolled up, he was always on top of her, while outside the door the pendulum wall-clock with guilt fittings slowly beat time. He rammed. He groaned. Had she wished, every night she could have counted about twenty moderate thrusts, the final one reinforced with a tenor note. Then he wrapped himself up and slept. In the darkness she lay empty and bewildered for another hour at least. Sometimes solacing her body herself.”

Another example: A man and a newspaper. “[F]or three hours has been reading line by line everything in the daily paper which while he reads has become yesterday’s paper.”

A final example: “Man that is born of women bears his parents on his shoulders. No, not on his shoulders. Within him. All his life he is bound to bear them, together with all their host, their parents, their parents’ parents, a Russian doll heavy with child back to the first generation: wherever he walks he bears his forbears, when he lies down he bears his forbears and when he rises up he bears them, or if he wanders far or stays in his place. Night after night he shares his cot with his father and his couch with his mother until his day comes.”
Accountant Albert Danon lives in the seaside town of Bat Yam, Israel. His wife, Nadia,dies of cancer. Their only son Rico, leaves Dita, his girl-friend in Israel, to travel through the mountains of Tibet and finds himself sleeping with Maria, a Portuguese woman. Meanwhile, Dita, who has been cheated of her money and left with no place to live, convinces Albert to let her stay with him.
Here's a poignant story of one family, each member or aquaintance trying as hard as possible to establish control of his life. That's not always as easy to achieve as it seems. The novel describes, in both in prose and poetry, how several people try to achieve that end. The novel slips so easily from prose into poetry and vice versa, that even readers who are not particularly interested in poetry may not mind this writing technique. Although it's a melancholy story, it's also an intriguing look at how several people relate to one another and how their goals at some times in their lives tend to either attract or repel others close to them. At one point, the author himself shows up as a character! That is really an interesting occurence and a situation not oftened encountered in most novels.
THE SAME SEA is not hard to read. However, because of the style in which it is written, it would lend itself to being read more than once. For sure, it deserves to be read at least a first time!