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Download Locke in 90 Minutes (Philsophers in 90 Minutes) eBook

by Paul Strathern

Download Locke in 90 Minutes (Philsophers in 90 Minutes) eBook
ISBN:
1566632617
Author:
Paul Strathern
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ivan R. Dee (November 8, 1999)
Pages:
91 pages
EPUB book:
1739 kb
FB2 book:
1794 kb
DJVU:
1114 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
545


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Locke in 90 Minutes (Phil. has been added to your Cart. As always, Strathern does an excellent job of putting the philosopher and his work into historical context: Locke in 90 Minutes is particularly strong on showing how the turbulence of English politics during the mid-1600s set Locke on the road to philosophy and shaped his ideas on democracy. He provides clear summaries that demonstrate how Locke's empiricism was informed by the scientific spirit of the times as well as the more metaphysical ruminations of Descartes (though he would veer very sharply from the conclusions of his French near-contemporary).

I like Strathern's books very much, but it seems to me here he chose a subject not especially amenable to this kind of treatment.

What would Kierkegaard have thought about this book? He would have perhaps appreciated Stathern's humor, his narrative skill, his quickness of mind, his emphasizing Kierkegaard's thought as directed not to abstraction but to 'lived life. But he probably would have resented the effort to reduce the complexities of his thought, their contradictions and dialectical intricacies to easily digestible form. I like Strathern's books very much, but it seems to me here he chose a subject not especially amenable to this kind of treatment. Скачать (pdf, 2. 4 Mb) Читать.

The Philosophy in 90 Minutes series, written by Paul Strathern, is a series of short introductory biographical overviews on well-known philosophers, set in brief historical context, along with brief impressions of their philosophies

The Philosophy in 90 Minutes series, written by Paul Strathern, is a series of short introductory biographical overviews on well-known philosophers, set in brief historical context, along with brief impressions of their philosophies. The books are also produced in audio format; read by narrator Robert Whitfield. The series’ intent is to "write about the philosophers' lives, adding in a few of their ideas".

Paul Strathern lectures in Philosophy and Mathematics at Kingston . Witty, Illuminating, and Blessedly Concise.

Paul Strathern lectures in Philosophy and Mathematics at Kingston University in London. I find them hard to stop reading. I cannot think of a better way to introduce oneself and one's friends to Western civilization.

Paul Strathern (born 1940) is a Scots-Irish writer and academic. He is the author of two successful series of short introductory books: Philosophers in 90 Minutes and The Big Idea: Scientists Who Changed the World

Paul Strathern (born 1940) is a Scots-Irish writer and academic. He was born in London, and studied at Trinity College, Dublin, after which he served in the Merchant Navy over a period of two years. He then lived on a Greek island. In 1966 he travelled overland to India and the Himalayas. He is the author of two successful series of short introductory books: Philosophers in 90 Minutes and The Big Idea: Scientists Who Changed the World.

Books related to Aristotle in 90 Minutes. Black History: History in an Hour. JFK: History in an Hour.

Paul Strathern is author of the popular and critically acclaimed Philosophers in 90 Minutes series. Mr. Strathern has lectured in philosophy and mathematics and now lives and writes in London. Highlights from the series include Nietzsche in 90 Minutes, Aristotle in 90 Minutes, and Plato in 90 Minutes. A former Somerset Maugham prize winner, he is also the author of books on history and travel as well as five novels. His articles have appeared in a great many newspapers, including the Observer (London) and the Irish Times. His own degree in philosophy came from Trinity College, Dublin.

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Sold bymad4books-uk (336189)99. Registered as business seller. Locke in 90 Minutes by Paul Strathern (Paperback, 1996). New (other): lowest price. item 5 Locke In 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 minutes - their lives and work) -Locke In 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 minutes - their lives and work).

In Locke in 90 Minutes, Paul Strathern offers a concise, expert account of Locke's life and ideas, and explains their influence on man's struggle to understand his existence in the world. The book also includes selections from Locke's writings; a brief list of suggested reading for those who wish to push further; and chronologies that place Locke within his own age and in the broader scheme of philosophy.
  • Realistic
Highly readable and very approachable, true of each volume in this series.

This book, as well as the entire series, is light in terms philosophical exposition but highly readable and makes a good introduction as well as a good source for historical context and personal stories.

In being so thin a volume, which is at once the greatest virtue and greatest vice of this book, there is not much to review or there is simply too much be said about what is not said. I have thus presented one key take away from the book in the title to this review: The mind starts as a blank slate; the law exists to protect life, liberty & property.
  • ℓo√ﻉ
I think Paul Strathern is brilliant. He must have looked at the way the "...for Dummies" series has a standard format and done something similar. I was more impressed with his treatment of Confucius. In both this book on Locke and the one on Confucius he gives us 50 pp. of content in two sections: "Subject's Life and Works" and "Afterword". But in the book on Locke, Strathern spent too many words poking fun at Locke and calling him boring. He also spent much more effort in describing the life and times of Locke than his philosophy. I think Strathern must find Locke too boring to spend much time discussing his contributions. "From Socrates to Sarte: the Philosophic Quest" by T.Z.Lavine gives four chapters to Hume and a handful of pages to Locke. "The Story of Philosophy" by Will Durant doesn't give a full chapter to either Hume or Locke, merely including them within the context of philosophers whom Durant considers greater. So at least Strathern has given more individual focus to Locke than other writers popularizing philosophy. Strathern also, as part of his format in this 90 Minutes series, gives representative quotes from Locke's work. This is a very nice touch and I recommend the book for this reason. You can see that reading Locke is like reading the King James version of the Bible: "Huh? What did he say?" This is a decent book, but I did feel a bit let down while reading it, which is why I give it 3 instead of 4 stars. Also, the other reviewer made comments saying that Locke's philosophy of government depends on the inate goodness of people. That is only that reviewer's opinion. That did not come across at all in this presentation of Locke's work.
  • Mushicage
Paul Strathern is confused. He thinks we buy his books because he is witty and irreverent. In fact, we buy them because we are misled by their titles, which seem to promise thoughtful introductions to interesting philosophers. As a result, Strathern and his readers are at cross-purposes, and neither gets what they really want. Strathern does not get an adoring audience that delights in his antics, because we do not care about him, and we did not come to laugh at Locke. We came to understand him, but we do not get a proper introduction, because Strathern is so busy displaying himself for our admiration that he hardly tells us what Locke actually said and did, only what he thinks of Locke. Strathern finds Locke boring, for example, but why does he think we should care? Does he think his boredom is an ironic mark of intellectual distinction that especially qualifies him to throw rocks at one of history's greatest thinkers? No, he is only making a bad joke and begging for our applause. In other words, Strathern is pathetic. He reminds me of the minor functionary who was asked to introduce a famous speaker, but who refused to leave the stage when he discovered that he loved to be the center of attention. And so he prattled on and on, abusing the embarrassed audience with his unwelcome opinions, while people shifted uncomfortably in their seats, hoping he would just shut up and let the real presentation begin. Someone should tell Strathern to just shut up and let the real presentation begin. Until they do, thoughtful readers must look elsewhere for an intelligent introduction to Locke (and to the many other topics Strathern has so effectively hidden behind himself). Fortunately, there are many fine authors who are not only better qualified to write about philosophy, but whose books actually deliver on their promise. I suggest you read one of them instead.
  • Chankane
I found this book to be essentially useless. It presented a brief, boring biography of Locke with little attention to his world altering theories. Waste of time.
  • Gavirim
Strathern tells in his usual humorous and fast- paced way the life of Locke, and provides his own take on Locke's thought. For Strathern Locke is one of the political thinkers who has done the most good. There is much to be said for this view as the emphasis in Locke on individual rights, on tolerance, on liberty are a major influence on the US Declaration of Independance and Constitution.

Locke also has a decisive influence on the philosophical tradition and turns it away from Aristotlian scholaticism toward learning through experience. In his great work an 'Essay on Human Understanding' Locke analyzes the way we come to know the world. He suggests quite in contradiction to what is believed today, that the mind is a tabula rasa a blank slate at the outset of life upon which experience freely writes. We today have more a sense of the inherent structures of the mind, linguistically and cognitively.

Locke's analysis of the 'impressions and ideas' we have in terms of our apprehension of the primary and secondary qualities of objects is based according to Strathern on the difference between the measurable and non- measurable qualities, and is thus related to the rise of scientific investigation during Locke's lifetime.

From Locke would of course follow Berkeley and after this the true demolition job of Hume. From the imperfect knowledge of the world through experience in Locke there would come in Hume a questioning of our ability to confidently know anything at all.

Locke is not one of the most brilliant of the great philosophers, but nonetheless one of the most influential.

Strathern does an excellent job of telling us how this is so.