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Download The «Divine Man»: His Origin and Function in Hellenistic Popular Religion (American University Studies) eBook

by Gail Peterson Corrington

Download The «Divine Man»: His Origin and Function in Hellenistic Popular Religion (American University Studies) eBook
ISBN:
0820402990
Author:
Gail Peterson Corrington
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers (December 31, 1986)
Pages:
334 pages
EPUB book:
1391 kb
FB2 book:
1311 kb
DJVU:
1104 kb
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4.5
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836


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his origin and function in Hellenistic popular religion. American university studies - v. 17. by Gail Paterson Corrington. Published 1986 by P. Lang in New York. Heroes, History, Missions, Religion, che Schule, Religious aspects, Religious aspects of Heroes. Classifications.

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Series: American University Studies. Gail Peterson Corrington. Contents: Description of the context of the divine man paradigm, in satire, popular philosophy, popular religiosity (magic), and in Hellenistic missions, especially the Christian. GO. Table of Contents. ISBN: 978-0-8204-0299-4. Availability: Out of print. Peter Lang International Academic Publishers. Job Vacancies Contact Us.

Hellenistic religion is any of the various systems of beliefs and practices of the . Elsewhere rulers might receive divine status without the full status of a God.

Hellenistic religion is any of the various systems of beliefs and practices of the people who lived under the influence of ancient Greek culture during the Hellenistic period and the Roman Empire (c. 300 BCE to 300 CE). There was much continuity in Hellenistic religion: the Greek gods continued to be worshipped, and the same rites were practiced as before. Magic was practiced widely, and this too, was a continuation from earlier times. Throughout the Hellenistic world, people would consult oracles, and use charms and figurines to deter misfortune or to cast spells.

Sociological and anthropological theories about religion (or theories of religion) generally attempt to explain the origin and function of religion. These theories define what they present as universal characteristics of religious belief and practice. From presocratic times, ancient authors advanced prescientific theories about religion. Herodotus (484 – 425 BCE) saw the gods of Greece as the same as the gods of Egypt.

The Divine Man: His Origin and Function in Hellenistic Popular Religion (American University Studies. Series VII. Theology and Religion). Author : Gail Paterson Corrington. Publisher : Peter Lang Pub Inc.

The relationship between religion and science is the subject of continued debate in philosophy and theology. To what extent are religion and science compatible? Are religious beliefs sometimes conducive to science, or do they inevitably pose obstacles to scientific inquiry?

The relationship between religion and science is the subject of continued debate in philosophy and theology. To what extent are religion and science compatible? Are religious beliefs sometimes conducive to science, or do they inevitably pose obstacles to scientific inquiry? The interdisciplinary field of science and religion, also called theology and science, aims to answer these and other questions. It studies historical and contemporary interactions between these fields, and provides philosophical analyses of how they interrelate.

The concept of the «divine man» theios aner was first formulated as an attempt to understand a particular Christology of the New Testament, that of Jesus as miracle-working Son of God, in its contemporary Hellenistic setting. While some recent New Testament scholarship has accepted the concept, there have also been strong arguments against its existence or usefulness as a paradigm. Both sides have failed to address the milieu in which the concept of the divine man arose and to which it appealed: the popular audiences addressed by the missionaries of the Graeco-Roman world. The present study is an exploration of the beliefs of these audiences and of the divine man as a popular paradigm.