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Download English Society: 1580-1680 eBook

by Professor Keith Wrightson

Download English Society: 1580-1680 eBook
ISBN:
0813532884
Author:
Professor Keith Wrightson
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press; Revised edition (January 23, 2003)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1540 kb
FB2 book:
1107 kb
DJVU:
1632 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
630


Few of those make it into Wrightson's book, which is so devotedly a social history that the civil war is hardly mentioned.

Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). Few of those make it into Wrightson's book, which is so devotedly a social history that the civil war is hardly mentioned. Instead, he wonders what homely things were like: how Englishmen and women met mates, talked their parents into agreeing to a marriage, learned to read, conducted themselves on Sundays.

Wrightson, Keith (2003). English society, 1580-1680 ( e. a b c "Keith Wrightson - Yale MacMillan Center - Center for the Study of Representative Institutions". "Keith Wrightson - Department of History".

English Society, 1580-1680 paints a fascinating picture of society and rural change in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries

English Society, 1580-1680 paints a fascinating picture of society and rural change in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. This is an excellent English Society, 1580-1680 paints a fascinating picture of society and rural change in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries

Keith Wrightson is a professor of history at Yale University.

Keith Wrightson is a professor of history at Yale University. His many books include Earthly Necessities: Economic Lives in Early Modern Britain. A brilliant and persuasive synthesis of the best recent work in all fields of seventeenth century English history. -Christopher Hill "A triumphant success. deserves to be widely read. T. Dickinson "Conceived as an intellectual whole and vibrantly alive. -John Kenyon, The Observer English Society, 1580-1680 paints a fascinating picture.

Wrightson’s innovative survey English Society, 1580-1680 has been in continuous print since 1982

Wrightson’s innovative survey English Society, 1580-1680 has been in continuous print since 1982. His work with David Levine on the Essex village of Terling, Poverty and Piety in an English Village (1979) introduced to English social history the ‘microhistorical’ approach which had previously been adopted mostly by historians of Continental Europe.

Professor Keith Wrightson FBA. About this Fellow. English society 1580-. Economic lives in early modern Britain 2000. Professor of History, Yale University. Lecturer in Modern History, University of St Andrews, 1975 - 1984. Lecturer, Reader, Professor of Social History, University of Cambridge, 1984 - 1999. Professor of History, Yale University, 1999. Professor of History, Yale University, Other Foreign Institutions, 1999. This is an excellent interpretation of English society, its continuity and its change.

item 4 English Society 1580-1680, Paperback by Wrightson, Keith, Brand New, Free P&P. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. item 5 English Society 1580-1680 by Keith Wrightson, NEW Book, FREE & Fast Delivery, (P -English Society 1580-1680 by Keith Wrightson, NEW Book, FREE & Fast Delivery, (P. £3. 6.

Keith Wrightson was Professor of Social History at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Jesus College. He is now Professor of History at Yale University. Among his publications is ENGLISH SOCIETY, 1580-1680. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

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  • Ces
I have never read a book before that has so many statements followed by: "X should not be exaggerated." Keith Wrightson's "English Society 1580-1680" is almost comical in its middle-of-the-roadness. If any English century should lend itself to exaggerations, it ought to be the one that encompassed Francis Drake, Willliam Shakespeare, a civil war, execution of a king, a military dictatorship and Isaac Newton.

Few of those make it into Wrightson's book, which is so devotedly a social history that the civil war is hardly mentioned.

Instead, he wonders what homely things were like: how Englishmen and women met mates, talked their parents into agreeing to a marriage, learned to read, conducted themselves on Sundays.

To an American, even one not descended from any of these English people, the answers are relevant, because the attitudes of 17th century England were the ones planted in North America, with their medieval survivals and modernizing innovations. In a book written long after this one, "Albion's Seed," David Hackett Fisher demonstrated how the attitudes of the early English (and in some cases, Dutch, German or even Swedish) settlers tended to magnify and reverberate for many generations. But mostly the English.

Wrightson presents a society rather freer and more flexible than its image. The law may have given fathers a veto over their children's marriage partners, but (except for the aristocracy), most fathers were indulgent. It was the beginning of love matches, but, as Wrightson also notes, it was a time and place where about one woman in 10 never married. This was, he notes, much different from European societies farther east, where virtually all women married.

Again, the riots against enclosures or food shortages were, in his description, less riots than theatrically staged protests, and they lacked the violent atrocities that marked French food protests of the same age.

He may oversell how indulgent, flexible and tolerant English society was. To the extent that English people were indulgent or tolerant, they limited their niceness to fellow Englishmen.

The other principal theme that comes through is that the century of 1580-1680 saw the creation of a permanent English underclass, such as had not existed before. In the middle ages and early Renaissance, England was rural and the people in it were to a considerable degree economically autonomous, if poor.

The commercialization of agriculture raised overall levels of consumption, but it cut away the self-sufficiency of the poorest, who were driven off the land, which had provided a regular, if small, income. Once they became wage laborers, their income periodically dropped to nothing, which happened to a medieval peasant only in times of total crop failure.

Life in England, says Wrightson, became less secure for the many, and, as we know from, say, the Left Book Club volumes of George Orwell, it remained that way for many centuries.
  • generation of new
One of the worst books I've ever had to endure as a history major. It has a lot of abstract information, so it is great as a supplement for papers, but gods if you have to read the whole thing you will need to expect a nap every ten minutes.