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by Jane Schaberg

Download The Illegitimacy of Jesus (Expanded 20th Anniversary Edition) eBook
ISBN:
1905048831
Author:
Jane Schaberg
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sheffield Phoenix Press Ltd; 20th ed. edition (October 17, 2006)
Pages:
332 pages
EPUB book:
1733 kb
FB2 book:
1917 kb
DJVU:
1771 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
231


Jane Schaberg's 1990 book is subtitled "A Feminist Theological Interpretation of the Infancy Narratives".

Jane Schaberg's 1990 book is subtitled "A Feminist Theological Interpretation of the Infancy Narratives". was lost to Christians, but it was passed on and developed in Jewish circles (1-2). Matthew's nativity scene (18-24) she insists is proof of the illegitimacy claim, at which point she goes into an extended section about the difference between rape and seduction according to Jewish law and customs in the 1st Century. Her discussion is scholarly and interesting, though hardly to her point.

The Illegitimacy of Jesus book. Jane Schaberg argued that Matthew and Luke were aware that Jesus had been conceived illegitimately, probably as a result of a rape of Mary, and had left in their Gospels some hints of that knowledge, even though their main purpose was to explore the theological significan This work of impeccable New Testament scholarship was a sensation when it was first published in 1987.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Illegitimacy of Jesus: A Feminist Theological . Place of Publication. Christianity: Bibles & Liturgy. 332. Country of Publication.

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Jane Schaberg argued that Matthew and Luke were aware that Jesus had been conceived illegitimately, probably as a result of a rape of Mary, and had left in their Gospels some hints of that knowledge, even though their main purpose was to explore the theological significance of Jesus' birth. By having the Messiah born out of the exploitation of a woman of the poor, God demonstrates the vindication of the oppressed in a truly miraculous manner.

Schaberg, Jane (1987). The Illegitimacy of Jesus: A Feminist Interpretation of the Infancy Narratives. Reprint: Crossroad, 1990. Harper & Row. ISBN 0062546880 pp. 33-34. Ranke-Heinemann, Uta.

Items related to The Illegitimacy of Jesus (Expanded 20th Anniversary. About the Author: Jane Schaberg is Professor of Religious Studies and Women's Studies at the University of Detroit Mercy. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Jane Schaberg argued that Matthew and Luke were aware that Jesus had been conceived illegitimately, probably as. .

Illegitimacy of Jesus : A Feminist Theological Interpretation of the Infancy Narratives. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780940989603. Release Date:January 1990. Publisher:Meyer-Stone Books.

Better to concentrate on identifying the biological father, so we can unravel the rest of Jesus' life. Schaberg insists that we can not know who the father was. But, there must have been thousands of people alive at the time who knew who it was.

This work of impeccable New Testament scholarship was a sensation when it was first published in 1987. Jane Schaberg argued that Matthew and Luke were aware that Jesus had been conceived illegitimately, probably as a result of a rape of Mary, and had left in their Gospels some hints of that knowledge, even though their main purpose was to explore the theological significance of Jesus' birth. By having the Messiah born out of the exploitation of a woman of the poor, God demonstrates the vindication of the oppressed in a truly miraculous manner. Exegetical precision, theological passion, and an exquisite prose style are combined in this landmark book, whose importance is yet to be fully recognized. Perhaps not surprisingly, the book and its author were vilified, even though scholarly reviewers found much to praise in it, and it still features on many classroom reading lists. For this Anniversary Edition, we have added Schaberg's own disturbing account of the reception of the book, and two extensive responses--one respectfully dissenting, one fully supportive--from other New Testament scholars.
  • Ballalune
Jane Schaberg's 1990 book is subtitled "A Feminist Theological Interpretation of the Infancy Narratives". Her thesis is that "texts dealing with the origin of Jesus...originally were about an illegitimate conception and not about a miraculous virginal conception... [and this fact] was lost to Christians, but it was passed on and developed in Jewish circles (1-2)."

The book is divided into 3 major sections: Matthew, Luke, and pre- and post-gospel traditions (Acts of Pilate, Gospel of Thomas, Rabbinic literature, and early Christians such as Justin, Irenaues, and Tertullian) followed by a brief epilogue and extensive notes. Unfortunately there is no reference list and no index.

The chapter on Matthew discusses his inclusion of "the four women" in his geneology of Jesus. While this issue has been discussed ad infinitum, Schaberg provides not only an extensive discussion, but a provocative one as well. She gets side-tracked by her own feminist concerns, but it is a side track that is interesting to pursue. She points out that all four "find themselves outside patriarchal family structures...are wronged or thwarted by the male world...risk damage to the social order [through their sexual activity]..." and "the situation of all four are righted by the actions of men who acknowledge guilt and/or accept responsibility for them (32-33)." It's an interesting analysis,. but doesn't add much to the discussion of Mary, as Schaberg readily admits.

Continuing with Matthew, she reviews the evidence vis-a-vis the mistaken geneology which she attributes to the illegitimacy (rather than Matthew's errors, of which they are many) or to the idea that Jesus is 13th and 14th (as Christ) in descent. Matthew's nativity scene (18-24) she insists is proof of the illegitimacy claim, at which point she goes into an extended section about the difference between rape and seduction according to Jewish law and customs in the 1st Century. Her discussion is scholarly and interesting, though hardly to her point.

Next she turns to Luke, which is the largest section in the book. Herein she tends to ramble (as does Luke) and this is probably her weakest section. The 3rd section concerns pre and post gospel sources, and here the most data for her claim is present.

Schaberg sees hints of Jesus' illegitimacy in John 8:41 ("We were not born of fornication") as well as John 7:53-8:11 (the adulteress). She claims Mark 6:3 ("son of Mary") is another veiled hint, yet she says "There is no certain evidence that the practice of identifying an illegitimate son by the name of his mother prevailed in first century Judaism (p. 161)." She quotes the Gospel of Thomas (v 105) "son of a harlot" to help make her case. She finds accusations in the Acts of Pilate (2:3) although she acknowledges that the claim is nullified by witnesses. She refers to Origen's Against Celsus to raise the Jewish slanders, yet she seems unaware that we have no Celus manuscripts to peruse. Finally, she settles into the Rabbinic literature.

This is certainly a scholarly book and one that offers a unique perspective. Unfortunately Schaberg refuses to consider the possibility that Joseph was the father but that the couple conceived prior to the accepted date; instead she only considers the idea that someone else fathered Jesus (Tabor, 2006, makes the same error). All her evidence can be used to make the former case as easily as it is used to make the latter.

Bottom line: there's lots of good scholarly evidence in this book, even if the conclusions are flawed and the lack of reference list and an index makes it cumbersome to followup. It's definitely worth reading.
  • Ishnjurus
Jane Schaberg is Professor of Religious Studies and Women's Studies at the University of Detroit Mercy. Her support of abortion (she is a member of Catholics for Free Choice) made her hiring controversial there, for conservative Catholics. She states in her Preface to this 1987 book, "What is presented here is a new interpretation of the New Testament Infancy Narratives--new claiming to be old. The hope is that it will send the general reader back to the biblical texts and to the work of other scholars, with lively interest in the basic issue raised."

In the Introduction to her explicitly "feminist work," she states plainly that "My claim is that the texts dealing with the origin of Jesus ... originally were about an illegitimate conception and not about a miraculous virginal conception. It was the intention ... of Matthew and Luke to pass down the tradition they inherited: that Jesus the messiah had been illegitimately conceived during the period when his mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph. At the pre-gospel stage, this illegitimate conception had already been understood theologically as due in some unexplained way to the power of the Holy Spirit. Both evangelists worked further with this potentially damaging and potentially liberating material."

She rejects "literalism," suggesting that "the Matthean phrases should be read in a figurative or symbolic, not a literal, sense." "The Lucan annunciation ... borders on deception. It is not fully the story of a woman for women, but a story told by a man's world for a man's world."

She frankly admits, "If the virginal conception of Jesus is not historical and is not the creation of the authors of primitive tradition or the authors of the New Testament Infancy narratives, where does it come from, and why does it appear? I do not know the answers to these questions."

She suggests that "In her Magnificat, Mary preaches as the prophet of the poor. She represents the hope of the poor, but she represents that hope AS A WOMAN who has suffered and been vindicated as a woman." She concludes the illegitimacy tradition "presents us not with a Goddess, but with a woman in need of a Goddess, with a woman we look at, not up at."

Interested readers will probably want to explore her more recent book, Resurrection Of Mary Magdalene: Legands, Apocrypha, And The Christian Testament.