almediah.fr
» » Live Television: Time, Space and the Broadcast Event (Media Culture & Society Series)

Download Live Television: Time, Space and the Broadcast Event (Media Culture & Society Series) eBook

by Stephanie Marriott

Download Live Television: Time, Space and the Broadcast Event (Media Culture & Society Series) eBook
ISBN:
0761959106
Author:
Stephanie Marriott
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
SAGE Publications Ltd; 1 edition (December 7, 2007)
Pages:
152 pages
EPUB book:
1515 kb
FB2 book:
1414 kb
DJVU:
1998 kb
Other formats
lrf doc txt azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
647


Stephanie Marriott has published extensively on live television.

Stephanie Marriott has published extensively on live television. 0%. 4 star4 star (0%).

Live Television book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Live Television: Time, Space and the Broadcast Event as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In this fascinating book, Stephanie Marriott engages in a close and detailed analysis of the nature of live television

In this fascinating book, Stephanie Marriott engages in a close and detailed analysis of the nature of live television. She examines the transformations in our experience of time and space which are brought about by the capacity of broadcasting to bring us the world in the moment in which it is unfolding, situating the live television event in the context of an expanding and increasingly complex global communicative framework. The study of television, still the most powerful of modern media, has long been fascinated by its capacity for 'liveness'.

We are a agency committed to helping you profile, reach and engage with your customers.

Live television: Time, space and the broadcast event . Cult television's series/serial hybridity often combines soap-operatic elements with limited runs or ‘seasons’ of episodes concluding with a cliffhanger. It is this series/serial combination which has especially facilitated the rise of the cult TV episode guide. This chapter explores the fact that work on cult television has somewhat neglected the role of official and fan-produced episode/programme guides.

In a fragmenting multichannel and multiplatform global broadcasting environment live television continues to attract huge audiences, bucking the trend towards narrowcasting and niche markets, yet little of a comprehensive nature has been written about the live television event.

This television system has changed gradually - cable channels began premiering their marquee shows year-round, for . Streaming could have the effect of making TV both more ubiquitous and more submerged in the culture.

This television system has changed gradually - cable channels began premiering their marquee shows year-round, for instance - but in general, it has repeated its orbital cycle, like planets revolving around the sun, since the mid 20th-century. The show that everyone talks about on Monday morning will be replaced by shows that different sectors of the audience start humming about days or weeks after they’re released.

The Southern Television broadcast interruption was the first major broadcast interruption through the Hannington transmitter of the Independent Broadcasting Authority in the United Kingdom at 17:10 on 26 November 1977. The mystery has never been solved. On Saturday 26 November 1977 Southern TV’s Andrew Gardner was presenting the early-evening news. At 17:10 the TV picture wobbled slightly, followed by a deep buzz. The audio was replaced by a distorted voice delivering a message for almost six minutes.

Live television is a television production broadcast in real-time, as events happen, in the present. In a secondary meaning, it may refer to streaming television over the internet.

In this fascinating and accessible book, author Stephanie Marriott engages in a close and detailed analysis of the nature of live television. The book examines the transformations in our experience of time and space which are brought about by the capacity of broadcasting to bring us the world in the moment in which it is unfolding, situating the live television event in the context of an expanding and increasingly complex global communicative framework. Building her argument by means of a series of case studies of events as diverse as the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963, the attack on the World Trade Centre in 2001, the 2005 London bombings, election night coverage and live sports coverage, the author provides a meticulous and articulate account of the way in which live television mediates the event for its audience.