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Download Mortmain Legislation and the English Church 1279-1500 (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series) eBook

by Sandra Raban

Download Mortmain Legislation and the English Church 1279-1500 (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series) eBook
ISBN:
0521242339
Author:
Sandra Raban
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (September 30, 1982)
Pages:
216 pages
EPUB book:
1677 kb
FB2 book:
1141 kb
DJVU:
1298 kb
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
105


Series: Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series (17). This is a comprehensive survey of medieval English mortmain legislation from both the point of view of the crown and that of the Church.

Series: Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series (17). Recommend to librarian. It examines methods of enforcement and evaluates their success. It traces the emergence of licensing policies and the increasing exploitation of licences for fiscal purposes, while at the same time establishing that this was not their original purpose.

Volume 35 Issue 1. Mortmain . .The Journal of Ecclesiastical History. Mortmain Legislation and the English Church 1279–1500. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life & Thought, 3rd se. vol. 1. Pp. xiii + 216. Cambridge University Press, 1982. 25. G. L. Harriss (a1).

of medieval English mortmain legislation from both the point of view of the crown and that of the Church. Mortmain Legislation and the English Church 1279-1500 (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series).

This is a comprehensive survey of medieval English mortmain legislation from both the point of view of the crown and that of the Church. It traces the emergence of licensing policies and the increasing exploitation of licences for fiscal purposes, while at the same time establishing that this was not their ori This is a comprehensive survey of medieval English mortmain legislation from both the point of view of the crown and that of the Church. 0521072417 (ISBN13: 9780521072410).

The estates of Thorney and Crowland : a study in medieval monastic land tenure, Sandra Raban

Mortmain legislation and the English Church, 1279-1500. Cambridge studies in medieval life and thought ; 3rd se. v. 17. Full contents. The estates of Thorney and Crowland : a study in medieval monastic land tenure, Sandra Raban. The Clergy Reserves of Upper Canada; a Canadian mortmain. The Mortmain plan, by A.

Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice Books. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series. Cambridge University Press. Mortmain Legislation and the English Church.

Mortmain Legislation and the English Church, 1279–1500. Robert Winchelsey and the Crown, 1294–1313: A Study in the Defense of Ecclesiastical Liberty. Margaret Harvey, The English in Rome, 1362–1420: Portrait of an Expatriate Community. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought 14. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1980. Volume 51 Issue 4 - Frances A. Underhill.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1955. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. Swanson, R. N. Church and Society in Late Medieval England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1989. 618 Bibliography Thomson, John A. F. The Later Lollards, 1414–1520. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1965. Woodcock, B. Medieval Ecclesiastical Courts in the Diocese of Canterbury. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1952. Workman, H. B. John Wyclif.

This book will be read and studied by every legal historian for years to come. Series: Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series (Book 49). Paperback: 268 pages. Gratian's collection of church law, the Decretum, was a key text in these developments and remained a fundamental work throughout and beyond the middle ages. Until now, the many mysteries surrounding the creation of the Decretum have remained unsolved. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (October 1, 2007).

This is a comprehensive survey of medieval English mortmain legislation from both the point of view of the crown and that of the Church. It examines methods of enforcement and evaluates their success. It traces the emergence of licensing policies and the increasing exploitation of licences for fiscal purposes, while at the same time establishing that this was not their original purpose. The extent to which the Church was acquiring land on a threatening scale by the later thirteenth century is questioned, and the effects of the legislation on subsequent acquisition are assessed against the background of new fashions in ecclesiastical patronage and a more hostile economic climate. The statutes of 1279 and 1391 are well known. What this study shows is how much variation lay behind the apparently straightforward system of licensing and how closely the issue of mortmain tenure was related to wider social, political and economic considerations.