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by Odie B. Faulk

Download The Geronimo Campaign eBook
ISBN:
0195083512
Author:
Odie B. Faulk
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (May 27, 1993)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1633 kb
FB2 book:
1932 kb
DJVU:
1797 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
590


Odie B. Faulk, Professor Emeritus of History at Northeastern University, has written numerous books, among them, North America Divided: The War With Mexico, Tombstone: Myth and Reality, and Land of Many Frontiers: A History of the American Southwest. Библиографические данные.

Odie B. The Geronimo Campaign.

soldiers over the deserts and mountains of Arizona, New Mexico, and northern Mexico in the mid 1880s, and traces its legacy well past Geronimo's ultimate surrender. He is especially concerned with the campaign's wider historical setting and significance, and with the sad record of betrayal of Native Americans by the .

Showing 30 distinct works. Faulk’s most popular book is The Geronimo Campaign. Showing 30 distinct works. The Geronimo Campaign by. Odie B. Faulk.

The surrender of the great Apache leader Geronimo to . Army Lieutenant Charles B. Gatewood in August of 1886 brought to an end a struggle that had begun in the early years of the century, and had figured prominently in the western campaign of the Civil War.

The Geronimo campaign. by. Faulk, Odie B. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Faulk is especially concerned with the campaign's wider historical setting and significance, and with the sad record of betrayal of the Native American by the . In a very real sense, it is the stuff of Greek tragedy.

Title: The Geronimo Campaign Item Condition: New. Author: Faulk, Odie B. ISBN 10: 0195083512. Used-Very Good: The book will be clean without any major stains or markings, the spine will be in excellent shape with only minor creasing, no pages will be missing and the cover is likely to be very clean. Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Geronimo Campaign by Odie B. Faulk (Paperback, 1993). Brand new: lowest price.

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Red cloth binding with gilt lettering. Endpapers illustrated with maps of the campaign areas. Clean text; 245 pages, indexed. The dustjacket has been clipped. Shows some minor wear; perhaps somewhat tanned. In a plastic protector.

The surrender of the great Apache leader Geronimo to U.S Army Lieutenant Charles B. Gatewood in August of 1886 brought to an end a struggle that had begun in the early years of the century, and had figured prominently in the western campaign of the Civil War. The words addressed by Gatewood to Geronimo as they met along the banks of Mexico's Bavispe River echoed those spoken in many such a meeting between victorious American commander and vanquished Native American. "Accept these terms or fight it out to the bitter end," said Gatewood. The terms were forced relocation to Florida and the ceding of the ancestral homeland of the Apaches to white settlers; the bitter end was, quite simply, annihilation. In The Geronimo Campaign, Odie B. Faulk, a leading historian of the American Southwest, offers a lively and often chilling account of the war that raged over the deserts and mountains of Arizona, New Mexico, and northern Mexico in the mid 1880's, and traces its legacy well past the ultimatum delivered to Geronimo on August 25, 1886. Faulk is especially concerned with the campaign's wider historical setting and significance, and with the sad record of betrayal of the Native American by the U.S. Government. In a very real sense, it is the stuff of Greek tragedy. Here among the mesas of the Southwest was inevitable conflict and inevitable defeat, with both sides losing and yet surviving their loss. The Apaches were forced to endure years of captivity and humiliation, and--like the Sioux, Comanche, and Nez Percé before them--the obliteration of their traditional way of life. The Army, seemingly the winner, was torn by conflicting claims of glory by its hubristic leaders. And Americans lost much that Apache culture might have contributed to their country, as well as more than a measure of American self-respect. Few emerge from Faulk's riveting account with their dignity and stature intact: only the titanic figure of Geronimo, and to a lesser extent the two men he knew and trusted among his opponents, Gatewood and General George Crook, retain a semblance of honor. Faulk shows that neither side wanted war, that both sides believed in the righteousness of their cause, and that the real instigators of the conflict were rapacious American settlers--the "Tucson Ring" of merchants--who sold grain, hay, and other provisions to the troops as well as to those living on the Indian reservations. Faulk's realistic and colorful narrative highlights many of the campaign's ironies as well as its dangers and vicissitudes. In addition, it vividly recreates life in an Army command post on the western frontier, offers an exceptionally clear and sympathetic life history of Geronimo, and sheds new light on the conflict through many hitherto unknown documents originally collected by Gatewood's son. Also included is a brief history of the Apache people, a full bibliography and notes, and many vintage photographs which lend a rare immediacy to this tragic story. The Geronimo Campaign ends with the great chief hundreds of miles away from his ancestral home, Crook relieved of his command, and Gatewood largely forgotten in the honors and awards bestowed by the Army in recognition of Geronimo's capitulation. A true American saga, this is a book for anyone who wishes to understand the roots of, and the reasons for, the tragic Indian Wars of the nineteenth century, a tragedy whose repercussions are still felt today.
  • Dark_Sun
Faulk's excellent book reveals that Geronimo lived during the last valiant struggle with the white settlers. He was a great if non-hereditary leader of the Chiricahua Apaches. Though he was the grandson of the chief of another tribe of Apaches, his father married a woman from the Chiricahuas. Being from a matriarchal system, Geronimo's father gave up all his rights to leadership and went to live with Geronimo's mother's tribe.

The Spaniards who colonized New Mexico beginning in 1598 and Arizona a century later wanted to convert the Indians to Christianity and make them Hispanic in the process. Their missions were built with this purpose in mind, but the Apache people, being fierce, independent and proud, resisted.

The Spaniards tried to make them submit by force, erecting numerous presidios (forts) across the norther frontier. Even the Apaches who were defeated did not want to settle in the shadow of a presidio, though other Indian tribes succumbed to the ploy. One settled, they were plied with inferior firearms and alcoholic beverages.

The system of the trading post was established because the independent and intelligent Apaches were not so easily reduced. From trading posts, Apaches were to receive annual presents from traders (gifted by the Mexican government). That way the government could keep an eye on them. This system broke down by 1831 when the annual distribution of presents ceased and war resumed between the Mexican government and the Apaches. Finally the Mexican states of Sonora and Chihuahua resorted to the old Spanish method of paying bounties for Apache scalps.

Geronimo was born into this reality. Scalp hunting brought wave after sickening wave of enterprising "backyard barbers." Since it was difficult to distinguish between a native American or Mexican scalp, whole villages of unsuspecting Mexicans were sometimes exterminated for their scalps.

Faulk renders a lively and often appalling account of the war that unfolded between the Apaches and the US soldiers, over the deserts and mountains of Arizona, New Mexico and northern Mexico in the mid 1880s, resulting in Geronimo's ultimate surrender.

While many individuals from the Apache and US military side attempted to uphold agreements, the blackguards and scoundrels, it turns out, belonged to the "Tucson Ring" of merchants who sold hay, grain and other provisions to soldiers and Indians living on reservations. They actively promoted and exaggerated accounts of bloody incidents in order to encourage more U.S. troops to be sent out West. They also connived with Indian agents to furnish substandard rations at standard prices, splitting the profits. Often with the aid of reservation agents (non-military men), they furnished no rations at all and simply pocketed the money.

This is why native American children frequently starved to death on the reservations they were eventually forced to go to.

Faulk explains the hierarchy of the US Army at the time and psychologically analyzes the attitudes and goals of the men who made their careers therein. What an eye-opener to learn that when General Custer lost at Little Big Horn, he had been hoping to get back a star in rank he had lost.

General George Crook, writes Faulk, championed justice for the Indians, especially the Apaches and wanted them to have the vote and be considered citizens.

There is a great deal in this book about Geronimo's bravery and the workings of his personality. Crook once said, "Geronimo has the best head on his shoulders of any Indian with whom I have ver come into contact." Geronimo's name became synonymous with courage, which is why paratroopers of the US Army in World War II began crying "Geronimo" when they jumped from an airplane.
  • Gann
the Geronimo campaign

MY BOOK
about-the surrender of THE (APACHE)--GERONIMO--
THE TIGER OF THE HUMAN RACE_(B-1829 to D-1909-79.)
written--5/27/1993--by odie b. faulk-----256 pgs.

story

about//revenge---raids---escape---pursuit---uneasy peace.
on 5 September 1886--Americans rejoiced at the news- GERONIMO
had surrendered to BRIG GEN MILES-9/4-with G were- CHIEF NAICHE
son of COCHISE---16 warriors/14 women/6 kids.
IT HAD TAKEN **ONLY--5000 regular troops to capture him**....tHiS
MEANT
+Gs+----CAPTIVITY--FORCED RELOCATION..... & HUMILATION.everyone
Screamed --HE ought to be hung. BUT-____G was NEVER a blood thirsty
savage_____!
this ended a A ^^SAD RECORD of THE BETRAYAL^^ --of the AMERICAN
INDIAN
by THE __________________ united states of america.

GERONIMO ------- A TRUE _________GREEK TRAGEDY.

___really--truly==HE WAS A GREAT MAN!___!

Another good book by--ODIE B FAULK ---who is a favorite of Mine.I HAVE
MANY OF HIS BOOKS--ALSO__read ANGIE DEBOs indian/okla BOOKS ......
I__ LOVE__ A N G I E!

remember--in ww2 American paratroopers when
they jumped from planes began calling --G E R N I M O.

bbp__okla city---65
  • Qane
This guy was amazing. You should read this.
  • Windforge
all in order,good price,item as described.deliver on time