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Download The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939 eBook

by Mr. J. Arch Getty,Oleg V. Naumov,V. Naumov Oleg,Mr. Benjamin Sher,J. Arch Getty

Download The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939 eBook
ISBN:
0300094035
Author:
Mr. J. Arch Getty,Oleg V. Naumov,V. Naumov Oleg,Mr. Benjamin Sher,J. Arch Getty
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yale University Press (April 1, 2002)
Pages:
640 pages
EPUB book:
1734 kb
FB2 book:
1106 kb
DJVU:
1746 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
905


The Road to Terror book.

The Road to Terror book. The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939. Annals of Communism).

Oleg V. Naumov Since 1917 the Bolsheviks had suppressed publication of books and newspapers by their political opponents.

Eventually deep insecurities that magnified any opposition and iron discipline within the party led thenomenklaturato support Stalin in purging their own colleagues, and in 1937 and 1938 they serially voted one another into prison. Since 1917 the Bolsheviks had suppressed publication of books and newspapers by their political opponents.

Arch Getty and Oleg V. Naumov Translations by Benjamin Sher. Yale University Press New Haven and London. Ending the Terror, 193 8 I 3. Two Bolsheviks 10. 11. Conclusion Appendixes I. Numbers of Victims of the Terror 2. Biographical Sketches Index of Documents Index. Writing a history of the Soviet terror of the 1930s closely based on archival documents is no easy undertaking. The directors of the terror machine were unashamed and unafraid of a negative historical verdict. They recorded and documented almost everything they did.

Arch Getty, Oleg V. Naumov. Place of Publication. J. Arch Getty is professor of modern Russian history at the University of California, Los Angeles. товар 1 Getty-Road To Terror BOOK NEW -Getty-Road To Terror BOOK NEW. Oleg V. Naumov is director of the Moscow archive RGASPI. Country of Publication. Translated by. Benjamin Sher.

Arch Getty is professor of modern Russian history at the University of California, Los Angeles. Naumov is deputy director of the Moscow archive of the former Soviet Communist Party, RGASPI.

Электронная книга "The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939", John Arch Getty, J. Arch Getty, Oleg V. This gripping book assembles and translates into English for the first time an astonishing array of formerly top secret Soviet documents from that period.

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The Road to Terror Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939, Updated and Abridge by J. Arch Getty 9780300104073 (Paperback, 2010) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 8 to 10 working days. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- People who bought this also bought. Naumov is deputy director of the Moscow archive RGASPI

Oleg V. Naumov is deputy director of the Moscow archive RGASPI. The authors track one such Stalinist's fate in detail, as they do that of Bukharin, Stalin's opponent in the 1920s.

the Communist Party and the dark inhumanity of the purge process. Read associated articles: General line of the party, Gulag, J. Arch Getty.

The road to terror : Stalin and the self-destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939, J. Arch Getty and Oleg V. Naumov ; translations by Benjamin Sher Getty, J. Arch (John Arch), 1950-. The dossiers, police reports, private letters, secret transcripts, and other documents expose the hidden inner workings of the Communist Party and the dark inhumanity of the purge process.

This gripping book assembles and translates into English for the first time top secret Soviet documents from 1932 to 1939, the era of Stalin's purges. The nearly 200 documents, including dossiers, police reports, private letters and secret transcripts, expose the hidden inner workings of the Communist Party and the dark inhumanity of the purge process.
  • Trex
This book is tremendously useful because it gives a hitherto unknown insight into exactly how Stalin and his closest cronies set in motion the purges of the 1930s. The heart of the book consists of around 200 secret Communist Party documents interspersed with commentary from the authors. The archival material suggests very strongly that the path to the terror was not planned meticulously from the start but consisted of a series of false starts and zigzags until Stalin decided in 1937 to crush all resistance to the party's rule. Of particular interest are a couple of documents which show how many members of the inner Politburo demanded stricter punishments for alleged wrong-doers than Stalin did himself. Barring the discovery of Stalin's diary many of the dictator's motives will remain unknown forever but the documents in this book do paint a largely convincing portrait of an unpopular regime in Moscow lurching from crisis to crisis, trying both to stablise the internal situation and also to eliminate the possibility of serious internal resistance. What does come through very clearly is how arbitrary the terror was and how many of those charged with repressing alleged foreign spies and saboteurs were almost guaranteed to be shot themselves. First the Politburo lashed out at the secret police for not doing enough to stamp out centres of Trotskyite resistance and then issued orders demanding the execution and arrest of millions of people across the country. Later the secret police came under fire for allegedly indulging in indiscriminate terror and repressing too many people. I can understand the point of the Kirkus Reviews contributor who doubted the authors' explanation that the Politburo pushed ahead with the purges because they were indeed convinced enemies lay behind every corner and a coup was always possible. A sense of self-preservation and the need to show Stalin they were onside surely did partly explain their enthusiasm for spilling blood. But this is a minor quibble about an otherwise excellent book.
  • Qane
I bought it while taking Professor Gettys class on Soviet Russia at UCLA. His knowledge of the subject is among the highest and most well regarded in the world.
  • Ger
This work is based on archives that have been opened in Russia on the old Soviet Union since the fall of Communism. It provides a fascinating glimpse of policy-making on the part of Stalin and the eventual liquidation of almost all of the Old Bolsheviks. It is truly as Wolfgang Leonard said -- the revolution devours its children. Only in this instance it also devoured the leaders.

The authors present their material in the form of actual speeches and documents dealing with high-level individuals in the 1930s. They do not spend much time on the tragedy that Stalin murdered from 17 to 28 million people in the Soviet Union from 1920 to 1945, but specifically target his elimination of all those who brought him to power. This phenomenon is well understood by historians -- Ibn Saud did it to the Wahhabis that fought for him, Hitler crushed the SA leadership & moved their manpower into the Wehrmacht, and Stalin extirpated the Bolsheviks.

What is interesting here is how Stalin was able to accomplish this with the complicit approval of those "about to die" and with confessions that beggared the most fertile imagination. As history has proven to us, there was NO movement against Stalin in the 30s (not even in the US), and the trials were all obscene rituals in falsehoods. So how did this happen?

Well, one point not brought out in this book (maybe in the next one) is that Jews made up an absolute majority of the Old Bolsheviks and Stalin was certainly an anti-semite. Literally the only Jew to survive was Lazar Kaganovich -- Stalin even imprisoned Molotov's Jewish wife and forced Molotov to divorce her. But the terror went far further than that.

The authors clearly point out that the Old Bolsheviks believed in their ideology and policies. Since their policies COULD NOT BE IN ERROR, the only possibility when they failed was that traitorous forces must have sabotaged their efforts. Even more, the correctness of the party line prevented them from criticizing the party or its supreme leadership -- much like a bishop cannot hold the Pope to have committed horrible errors. And above all, they wanted to remain in the party (the womb?) at all costs -- even if it cost them their lives. So they confessed to imaginary crimes so they could remain true to socialism and the party line. Confessions were a ritual to gain acceptance -- even if that acceptance could only be in death.

What alternatives were present for Stalin to understand the situation? One way would be to understand it as a consequence of faulty policies. That was, of course, impossible. Everything Stalin and his cohorts believed from their background, experience and education convinced them that they were following the "correct" (read politically correct) solution to every situation. Did they not come to power by believing that? Did not social history validate them? It was genuinely impossible for Stalin and his supporters to believe that their policies and ideology were wrong. Therefore, the problems must have been externally created. Those who were against him (sometimes personally), against social progress, and wrecking his initiatives were responsible, at fault, and unpatriotic. There was simply no other possibility. After all, Stalin's policies were correct and were being implemented by the "right" people. If the people didn't know what was good for them, well, they would have to be educated or eliminated.

The terror was magnified by the simple difficulty of adhering to the party line since it often changed and was sometimes difficult to divine due to mixed signals. Excessive actions following party guidance to ingratiate oneself to the leadership was as dangerous as opposing the party (other than living a little longer.) Yagoda and Yezhov were certainly good examples of that. So there is much to learn here.

One of the other reviewers took the opportunity this book presents to go off on a rant against ex-President Bush. Frankly, that's the wrong person. If one wishes to apply this book's lessons to the current day, look to those people who follow some ideology to an extreme extent and admit no possible error in the policies of that ideology. Bush could and did admit to errors and mistakes, although he certainly did not castigate himself sufficiently to appease far-left fanatics. So who are those who can't make mistakes? Who directed the Nazis to Jewish property so they could seize it but admits to no wrongdoing? Who puts an individual who holds dual citizenship in as chief of staff for the White House? Who gives billions to Acorn so they can better control the voting? Who spends most of his time campaigning to move the US to a European-style socialist state? Who brooks no treason in that campaign, categorizing anyone who opposes him as stupid, clinging to his God, his guns (and his freedom?) Take my sixth paragraph above (the one starting with "What alternatives" and substitute Obama's name for Stalin's and change the verbs to the present tense. The paragraph is directly applicable today.

As I said, there is much to learn here.

I recommend this book to all, and if the reader is not sufficiently familiar with the players in the Soviet Union at the time, I highly recommend more reading. This is simply too important to ignore. We need to learn from history, not ignore it.