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Download The Wounded Animal: J. M. Coetzee and the Difficulty of Reality in Literature and Philosophy eBook

by Stephen Mulhall

Download The Wounded Animal: J. M. Coetzee and the Difficulty of Reality in Literature and Philosophy eBook
ISBN:
0691137374
Author:
Stephen Mulhall
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (December 28, 2008)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1654 kb
FB2 book:
1586 kb
DJVU:
1288 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
168


The Wounded Animal is a book every serious student of Coetzee's work will want to read.

The Wounded Animal is a book every serious student of Coetzee's work will want to read. It articulates a vision of his achievement as an artist and moral thinker that is nuanced, compelling, and important. The book is obviously essential reading, too, for scholars of animal studies and for those interested in the relationship between literature and philosophy. Mulhall has enormously enriched the philosophical response to Coetzee. -Elizabeth Hirsh, Contemporary Literature

The Wounded Animal: J. M. Coetzee and the Difficulty of Reality in Literature and Philosophy. Critical perspectives on J. Coetzee, eds. Graham Huggan and Stephen Watson (New York, NY: St. Martin's Press, 1996).

The Wounded Animal: J. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-13737-7. Critical Essays on J. Coetzee, ed. Sue Kossew (New York, NY: . A Universe of (Hi)stories: Essays on J. Liliana Sikorska (Frankfurt am Main; New York, NY: Peter Lang, 2006). J. Coetzee and the Idea of the Public Intellectual, ed. Jane Poyner (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2006). Coetzee: Critical Perspectives, ed.

Greeks: the quarrel between philosophy and poetry. of reality with which humankind struggles on a daily basis (70). In thus situating Coetzee at the center of this millennia-long debate, and with Costello as his unwitting guide, Mulhall sets about reexamining the troubled relationship between literary invention and philosophical inquiry. While both Cora Diamond and John Updike have discussed difficulties of reality in their work, Mulhall defines such situations as those in which an indisputably real phenomenon is inexplicably and painfully resistant to ratiocination.

In The Wounded Animal, Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, and the ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing in particular on their powerful presentation of both literature and philosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality.

In The Wounded Animal, Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, and the ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing in particular on their powerful presentation of both literature and philosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality-in part because of reality's resistance to such projects of understanding, but also because of philosophy's unwillingness. to learn from literature how best to acknowledge that resistance

In The Wounded Animal, Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, and the ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing in particular on their powerful presentation of both literature and philosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality. to learn from literature how best to acknowledge that resistance

Stephen Mulhall received a BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford in 1983. 2008 The Wounded Animal: J. Coetzee and the Difficulty of Reality (Princeton)

Stephen Mulhall received a BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford in 1983. He then pursued an MA in Philosophy from The University of Toronto in 1984. Between 1984 and 1988, he attended Balliol College and All Souls College, Oxford for his DPhil in Philosophy. From 1986 to 1991 he was a Prize Fellow at All Souls. Coetzee and the Difficulty of Reality (Princeton). 2013 The Self and Its Shadows: A Book of Essays on Individuality as Negation in Philosophy and the Arts (Oxford University Press).

InThe Wounded Animal, Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, and the ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing in particular on their powerful presentation of both literature and philosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality.

InThe Wounded Animal, Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, and the ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing in particular on their powerful presentation of both literature and philosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality-in part because of reality's resistance to such projects of understanding, but also because of philosophy's unwillingness to. learn from literature how best to acknowledge that resistance

Stephen Mulhall's The Wounded Animal is an extended and detailed give and take with this entire complex system - The Lives of Animals, Philosophy and Animal Life, and Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello.

Stephen Mulhall's The Wounded Animal is an extended and detailed give and take with this entire complex system - The Lives of Animals, Philosophy and Animal Life, and Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello. The book is in two parts. The first, devoted to The Lives of Animals and the various philosophical responses to it, is most importantly an attempt to enlarge our view of what counts as a philosophical argument.

Reality and Philosophy: Reflections on Cora Diamond's Work. Leonard Lawlor - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (4):353-366. Philosophy and Animal Life.

Stephen Mulhall - 2008 - In The Wounded Animal: J. Reality and Philosophy: Reflections on Cora Diamond's Work. Stanley Cavell, Cora Diamond, John McDowell, Ian Hacking & Cary Wolfe - 2008 - Columbia University Press.

In The Wounded Animal,Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, andthe ways in which philosophers have . Stephen Mulhall is fellow and tutor in philosophy at New College, University of Oxford.

In The Wounded Animal,Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, andthe ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing inparticular on their powerful presentation of both literature andphilosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality-in partbecause of reality's resistance to such projects of understanding, butalso because of philosophy's unwillingness to learn from literature howbest. to acknowledge that resistance. His books include On Film, The Conversation of Humanity, and Philosophical Myths of the Fall (Princeton).

In 1997, the Nobel Prize-winning novelist J. M. Coetzee, invited to Princeton University to lecture on the moral status of animals, read a work of fiction about an eminent novelist, Elizabeth Costello, invited to lecture on the moral status of animals at an American college. Coetzee's lectures were published in 1999 as The Lives of Animals, and reappeared in 2003 as part of his novel Elizabeth Costello; and both lectures and novel have attracted the critical attention of a number of influential philosophers--including Peter Singer, Cora Diamond, Stanley Cavell, and John McDowell.

In The Wounded Animal, Stephen Mulhall closely examines Coetzee's writings about Costello, and the ways in which philosophers have responded to them, focusing in particular on their powerful presentation of both literature and philosophy as seeking, and failing, to represent reality--in part because of reality's resistance to such projects of understanding, but also because of philosophy's unwillingness to learn from literature how best to acknowledge that resistance. In so doing, Mulhall is led to consider the relations among reason, language, and the imagination, as well as more specific ethical issues concerning the moral status of animals, the meaning of mortality, the nature of evil, and the demands of religion. The ancient quarrel between philosophy and literature here displays undiminished vigor and renewed significance.

  • Getaianne
Stephen Mulhall is, almost unquestionably, one of the most gifted-and fertile-of contemporary philosophers. His range of interests and reading is almost phenomenal. He has written on topics ranging from religion to film, and linguistic philosophy to communitarianism.
His philosophical outlook is also almost unique. He seems to owe equal debts to Ludwig Wittgenstein, Martin Heidegger, Soren Kierkegaard, and Friedrich Nietzsche. In addition, he has a much deeper knowledge of - and sympathy for- Christian theology than many of his colleagues. He adds to this a profound understanding of art, literature and film, and an extraordinarily limpid, fluent literary style and mode of argumentation.
This is his latest book. I must confess that I am still assimilating its thesis (or theses). Perhaps I will have to read it a few times before I can do justice to its arguments. Knowing that, I will still try to make a few comments.
One one level, this book is a commentary on, and sympathetic critque of, J.M Coetzee's polemic in the form of a novel, Elizabeth Costello. As many people know, Coetzee's book is, among other things, a defense of "animal rights"- a very radical defense.
However, Mulhall's book is more than acontribution to the current debate about the rights of non-human animals. It is also a contribution to a debate as old as Socrates and Aristophanes, and perhaps even as old as the Pre-Socratics. It is the debate one finds in Plato's Republic- the debate between poetry, broadly conceived, and philosophy.
In short a remarkable, thought-provoking book by an extremely interesting thinker.
  • Windbearer
A decade after her arrival in our consciousnesses, I don't think we've plumbed the depths of Elizabeth Costello--the curmudgeonly, exhausted, and elderly Australian novelist who populates a number of the fictions of J. M. Coetzee. She complicates and ironizes Coetzee's LIVES OF ANIMALS and (naturally) ELIZABETH COSTELLO, and she pops up to excoriate "John" in SLOW MAN. For me, Costello is the welcome voice of literature and unregulated (even inadmissible) feeling in the dry and argumentative discourses of both analytical and Continental philosophies, and Mulhall's is a timely and exhaustive analysis of Elizabeth Costello as device and persona. Mulhall's sentences can be frustratingly opaque and baroque, and I didn't find his excursus into theories of modernism and art to be particularly helpful. Nonetheless, he recognized that Coetzee is challenging philosophical thinking about animals in ways that (many) philosophers seem ill-equipped to respond to, especially given the many shades of irony that tint Costello's characterization and presence within the books.

As an animal activist myself, I see myself in Costello--with all my faults and tics. I recognize her exhaustion, her recognition of her inadequacy and inconsistencies, her shocked irritation that others cannot see what she sees, her envy at their comfort, and her sense that any contribution (whether written or in her life) that she might make is wholly inadequate to the horrors that surround her. That embodiedness cannot be rationalized, which is why the novelist or poet (as Costello might say) is better able to explore our animality than the philosopher.

Mulhall's book is a bit of a slog but well-worth the time and effort and I look forward to reading it again.