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Download The Rise and Fall of Great Companies: Courtaulds and the Reshaping of the Man-Made Fibres Industry (Pasold Studies in Textile History) eBook

by Geoffrey Owen

Download The Rise and Fall of Great Companies: Courtaulds and the Reshaping of the Man-Made Fibres Industry (Pasold Studies in Textile History) eBook
ISBN:
0199592896
Author:
Geoffrey Owen
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
OUP/Pasold Research Fund (October 28, 2010)
Pages:
338 pages
EPUB book:
1768 kb
FB2 book:
1139 kb
DJVU:
1889 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
630


Geoffrey Owen's book on the demise of the Courtaulds company is one of the finest studies I know of a company grappling with a changing industry landscape.

Geoffrey Owen's book on the demise of the Courtaulds company is one of the finest studies I know of a company grappling with a changing industry landscape. It has much to teach us of how the world works, and I cannot think of a better antidote to offer students whose textbooks discuss business strategy in overly simplified settings. Professor John Sutton, London School of Economics).

Courtaulds was a British company which was once the world's leading producer of man-made fibres. It failed to adapt to the crisis in that industry that began in the mid-1970s, and lost ground to the point where, 25 years later, it could no longer sustain itself as an independent company. The crisis stemmed from the shift of textiles, clothing, and man-fibre production to low-wage countries, and above all to China.

Long run history of the Lancashire textile industry. This result implies that book leverage should fall with the addition of growth options. Underinestment costs of debt increase and free cash flow benefits fall with additional growth options. Thus, if debt capacity is defined as the amount of debt the firm optimally adds for an incremental project, then the debt capacity of growth options is negative.

This book is about a company which pioneered a major new industry . Owen, Geoffrey, 2010.

This book is about a company which pioneered a major new industry, failed to build on that success, and ended up being taken over and broken u. Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199592890.

Pasold studies in textile, dress and fashion history . The book examines the role of silk production and use in various cultures and its relation to everyday and regulatory practices. It considers silk as a major force of cross cultural interaction through technological exchange and trade in finished and semi-finished goods.

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Textile production in Britain can be said to have its roots as an industry at the beginning of the 18 th century, when Thomas Crotchet and George Sorocold established what is thought to be the first factory built in Britain. It was a textile mill with a waterwheel as its source of power, the latest machinery, and even accommodation for the workers. As well as possibly being the first sweatshop in the modern sense, it was the beginning of the end for traditional textile production.

This book is about a company which pioneered a major new industry, failed to build on that success, and ended up being taken over and broken up. By comparing this firm with its competitors in the same industry, the book sheds light on one of the hardest of all managerial challenges: what companies can do when their industry goes through a period of turbulence, forcing them to change direction, learn new skills, and perhaps abandon businesses on which they have relied for many years.Courtaulds was a British company which was once the world's leading producer of man-made fibres. It failed to adapt to the crisis in that industry that began in the mid-1970s, and lost ground to the point where, 25 years later, it could no longer sustain itself as an independent company. The crisis stemmed from the shift of textiles, clothing, and man-fibre production to low-wage countries, and above all to China. The book looks in some detail at the other companies - European, American, and Japanese - which had a big commitment to man-made fibres in the earlier post-war decades and, like Courtaulds, faced difficult adjustment problems in the closing years of the 20th century. Why did some of them handle the crisis better than Courtaulds? In answering this question the book looks both at decisions taken by individual managers and at the national context in which they were operating. Institutional differences between countries, notably in the role of shareholders and the financial markets, played an important role in determining which companies survived and which did not.