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Download Motherless (American Tragedy in Trilogy) eBook

by Brian J. Gail

Download Motherless (American Tragedy in Trilogy) eBook
ISBN:
193101874X
Author:
Brian J. Gail
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Emmaus Road Publishing; 2nd edition (June 1, 2011)
Pages:
511 pages
EPUB book:
1461 kb
FB2 book:
1970 kb
DJVU:
1681 kb
Other formats
azw mbr lit mobi
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
553


Series: American Tragedy in Trilogy (Book 2). Paperback: 511 pages. Brian Gail's new novel Motherless is a sequel to his earlier novel Fatherless, and it anticipates the third book in the series, Childless.

Series: American Tragedy in Trilogy (Book 2). Gail uses the device of the novel to communicate three basic truths: a) there is such a thing as truth; b) the Catholic Church is its preeminent teacher (see 1 Tim 3:15); and c) although the Church itself is preserved from teaching moral evil, some of its pastors and faithful are infected by the flagitious spirit of the times.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Motherless (American Tragedy Trilogy Book 2) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Start by marking Fatherless (American Tragedy Trilogy Book 1) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Catholic fiction unlike anything you ve ever read! This heart-pounding adventure spanning forty years culminates in Childless, the third novel in Brian J. Gail . .

15 results for brian j gail. 2 brian j gail motherless fatherless trade.

An American Tragedy is a novel by American writer Theodore Dreiser, published at the end of 1925. He began the manuscript in the summer of 1920, but a year later abandoned most of that text.

Fatherless" is the first volume of what the author has dubbed the "American Tragedy in Trilogy" hows what life was like for Catholics good and bad during this critical time.

Fatherless" is the first volume of what the author has dubbed the "American Tragedy in Trilogy". It will be followed later this year by the highly anticipated sequel, "Motherless", and finally (next year) "Childless" hows what life was like for Catholics good and bad during this critical time. This book is a great opportunity for Catholics to take hold of who they really are.

On one level, An American Tragedy is the story of the corruption and destruction of one man, Clyde Griffiths .

On one level, An American Tragedy is the story of the corruption and destruction of one man, Clyde Griffiths, who forfeits his life in desperate pursuit of success. On a deeper, more profound level, the novel represents a massive portrayal of the society whose values both shape Clyde's tawdry ambitions and seal his fate: It is an unsurpassed depiction of the harsh realities of American life and of the dark side of the American Dream. Based on an actual crime case, An American Tragedy was the inspiration for the film A Place in the Sun, winner of six Academy Awards, starring Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift.

l, blotting out of two lives.

l, blotting out of two lives at Pass Lake, had its weight.

Dreiser's An American Tragedy the young protagonist Clyde.

Brian J. Gail has written another heart pounding, page turner of a novel for Catholics who are straining to hear their Church's voice in what Pope John Paul II called the final confrontation between the Church and the anti Church, the Gospel and the anti Gospel. Motherless takes the reader on a riveting behind-the-scenes journey around the globe to the boardrooms and laboratories where the architects of The Life Sciences Revolution are preparing Mankind's Final Solution ... and into the confessionals and chanceries where the Church's response is being challenged. Father John Sweeney, pastor of a small catholic parish on Philadelphia's storied Main Line, is drawn into an apocalyptic vortex through the lives of parishioners Maggie Kealey, Michael Burns and Joe Delgado. Without warning they are ushered through the back door of the Revolution where they discover human embryos being created in laboratories and frozen in cryogenic freezers for a global black market. It is, however, when the Revolution's ultimate destination is revealed to one of the three that Fr. Sweeney is faced with his greatest test as a pastor guiding a soul to the Christian accountability to truth even in the face of potentially deadly consequences. In Motherless, best selling catholic author Brian J. Gail has created another spellbinding narrative that explores the ever more slippery slope of Man's technology and its existential threat to family and church. As in Fatherless, Gail's transcendent storytelling, scintillating dialogue and richly interwoven sub plots will leave readers breathless and hungry for more.
  • Dead Samurai
Had the privledge of the author's presentation at a recent conference /retreat on men's spirituality. Picked up his trilogy and read the three over a two week period. Quite an experience. Lives were alive and right out there before your eyes. Tough personal, family and professional choices are examined in context, making the choice rational if not based on faith. Many swings as you recognize choices that grind against one's belief and then see just how the choices played out. A very good read if not an occasional slow moment here and there. I can promise you you will either end reading as you approach the latter third of this 2nd volumn OR you will forget the hour and hurry on to begin Childless, the final volumn in the trilogy.
  • Vuzahn
Brian Gail's new novel Motherless is a sequel to his earlier novel Fatherless, and it anticipates the third book in the series, Childless. Gail uses the device of the novel to communicate three basic truths: a) there is such a thing as truth; b) the Catholic Church is its preeminent teacher (see 1 Tim 3:15); and c) although the Church itself is preserved from teaching moral evil, some of its pastors and faithful are infected by the flagitious spirit of the times. Gail believes, with Father Regis Scanlon (who has strongly influenced Gail) that the unworthy reception of Holy Communion (see 1 Cor 11:27) is at the heart of Church problems and is, in fact, a sign of the corrupt social circumstances in which we live (see pp. 159, 311). In much the same way, Gail is (entirely correctly) deeply concerned that we are increasingly viewing people as products (see p. 405; and see CCC #2378).

Upon such convictions, Gail builds his story of a "revolution" which will lead to a kind of brave new world of bioethics. Conspirators are planning to build a biotechnical empire by trading in embryos, by designing new humans who will live to be 1,000 years old, and by engaging in various other nefarious eugenics practices. The indomitable nurse Maggie Kealey (whom we met in Fatherless) now is the head of an ostensibly Catholic hospital in which decidedly anti-Catholic bioethical practices are routine. In part, the novel is a study of Kealey's fight against apathetic, cowardly, or evil leaders (such as a nun and a cardinal) and of her chaste romance with a staff doctor (whom she cannot marry because her estranged husband still survives).

We meet again such characters as Joe Delgado and Michael Burns, the success of whose careers seems to turn upon their willingness to ignore Church teaching. To what extent will they sacrifice what is right on the pagan altar of what is expedient? Counseling them is, again, Father John Sweeney, whose story is at the heart of the earlier novel Fatherless. Having now become a true "Father" (a priest willing always to speak the truth in love), Father Sweeney is Gail's voice for preaching and teaching orthodoxy. One might object that Father Sweeney is a little too lachrymose, but his homilies are refreshing (which is Gail's point, after all) in an age of frequently insipid and obsequious sermons.

Motherless can become overheated in places, characters are often overdrawn, and the plot is at once too improbable and too formulaic. As a work of fiction, the novel is weak. Seen, however, as a means of understanding Catholic bioethical teaching, it has the great virtues of accuracy, readability, and passion. (People who will not read Dignitas Personae or, say, Embryo by George and Tollefsen, for example, will--and should--read this teaching novel, which is a kind of allegory for our day.) The simple and terrible fact is that we are living in a time in which thousands of tiny human beings are locked away in freezers; in which people are hatched in petri dishes; in which embryos can be and are traded like "futures"; in which animal parts increasing find their way into humans ("chimeras"); in which contraception is praised even by some Christians; in which marriage is effectively subverted by iniquitius public policy; in which abortion is routine; and in which widespread euthanasia is on the horizon. And too many Catholics respond to all this with a yawn, while some morally perplexed priests issue invitations to pro-abortion speakers to speak at commencement exercises at their universities and some excessively complaisant bishops eulogize, or bury from Catholic churches, politicians whose careers have been spent publicly mocking the teaching of the Church to which those politicians claim allegiance--when it suits them. We have, as C. S. Lewis might have said, made too many "men without chests."

In the face of these and many other monstrous evils (which would make Dr. Josef Mengele smile), many bishops, priests, and deacons say--nothing. Gail is at his tragic best in depicting such pastoral acedia (CCC #2733), which is a nice way of saying "cowardice." Gail's novel is a study (and he mentions the terms) in material and formal cooperation with evil. The tragic fact is that homilists who never preach against the "revolution on life science," believing instead in what they see as "progress" or "tolerance" or the need to be "popular," are cooperating with the very evil (cf. James 4:17) they should be thunderously denouncing.

Gail's novels can be read in tandem or separately. Either or both would be ideal for parish discussion groups, and I recommend them--again, not as great fiction, but as insights into Catholic bioethics teaching and as reliable witnesses to it. (Seminarians should also read and serious discuss this three-part series of novels.) I particularly recommend that those reading Gail's novels simultaneously read Janet Smith and Christopher Kaczor, Life Issues, Medical Choices. One hopes that Gail's work may find a large audience among Protestants as well as Catholics.

No review of this novel can responsibly omit criticizing the, well, deplorable copy editing. People buy a book with the expectation (forlorn in this case) of professional presentation. This novel is so filled with errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation that the author and publisher should be seriously embarrassed. Words such as discreet, all right, benefited, indispensable, discernible, reiterate (and others) are misspelled routinely. Even "hear, hear!" is misspelled (410). The author occasionally uses incorrect cases (he/him, etc.), guesses about how to make Burns and other nouns [367, 411, 488] plural or possessive, confuses words like sung and sang (248), laying or lying (432), misuses hyphens (211, 362, 436), blunders about Johns Hopkins (425), and painfully so on. Readers deserve a professionally published book; because of the large number of errors here, this does not qualify as one. One hopes for much better in Childless.

Despite the regrettable errors (suggesting a very hasty proofreading and printing), this book still performs a commendable service for its readers, and I hope it will enjoy wide readership. Catholics are generally very poorly "catechized"--a euphemism for saying that we Catholics are badly educated (see pp. 314-315). This failed education is not only in apologetics, bioethics, and moral theology; it is also in general liberal education, which is the necessary foundation for subsequent successful learning. Until we re-learn to learn and until we revivify genuine Catholic liberal arts education, the redoubtable Father Sweeney will too often speak to those who cannot or will not hear. And the consequences of that are eternal.
  • Quttaro
Loved it, yet to read Childless. Continues depth of motivation for all characters. It is surprisingly funny, I wish I talked like that.
  • Faegal
I have been recommending this trilogy for years to people of all faiths,not just Catholics. It gives laity and also ministers an insight into the problems and resolutions facing minister and counselors. You will be surprised by the maturity level and how that influences the outcomes for those involved . The changes in how the individuals view the same problems brought to them for their help over the years and increasing maturity is insightful. It really brings home the proverb "With age comes wisdom."
  • Mr_Mole
Second book of trilogy. Read all three. Great read for Catholics.
  • lucky kitten
Exciting interesting Catholic read. Couldn't put it down.
  • Ballazan
This series is the first truly Catholic fiction I have read, but it seems more real than fiction. Characters are all challenged to live up to their Catholic faith when it comes to the issues of divorce, contraception, abortion, complicity, standing up for your beliefs. Challenging, inspiring. Very good book. Read "Fatherless" first.
If you liked "Fatherless", you will enjoy Motherless. Brian Gail has a way of weaving an interesting pattern among his characters and having them linked to one another as their actions and lives intertwine throughout the book. It is also a thought-provoking work and entails not a small amount of spirituality.