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Download Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy eBook

by The Cowherds

Download Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy eBook
ISBN:
0199751439
Author:
The Cowherds
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 24, 2010)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1953 kb
FB2 book:
1382 kb
DJVU:
1233 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
551


The Cowherds are scholars of Buddhist studies from the United States, Great Britain, Switzerland, Korea, Australia .

The Cowherds are scholars of Buddhist studies from the United States, Great Britain, Switzerland, Korea, Australia and New Zealand. They are united by a commitment to rigorous philosophical analysis as an approach to understanding Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology, and to the union of philology and philosophy in the service of greater understanding of the Buddhist tradition and its insights. They are: Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay L. Garfield, Guy Martin Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans, and Jan Westerhoff.

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Famous Buddhist scholar Nagarjuna considered two levels of reality: one called conventional reality and the other ultimate reality. Within this framework, Sunyata refers to the claim that at the ultimate. level objects are devoid of essence or intrinsic properties, but are interdependent by virtue of their relations to other objects. Catuskoti refers to the claim that four truth values, along with contradiction, are admissible in reasoning.

Home Browse Books Book details, Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist. The doctrine of the two truths-a conventional truth and an ultimate truth-is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools and is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school.

This book challenges the conventional view that the Buddha's teachings represent universal themes of human existence, allowing for a fresh, compelling explanation of the Buddhist theory of liberation.

The doctrine of the two truths-a conventional truth and an ultimate truth-is central to Buddhist metaphysics . This book, the product of years of collaboration by ten cowherds engaged in philosophy and Buddhist studies, provides this analysis.

The doctrine of the two truths-a conventional truth and an ultimate truth-is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. The book asks, What is true about conventional truth? and What are the implications of an understanding of conventional truth for our lives?

The doctrine of the two truths a conventional truth and an ultimate truth is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology.

The doctrine of the two truths a conventional truth and an ultimate truth is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology.

In Moonshadows, the Cowherds, a team of ten scholars of Buddhist Studies, address the nature of conventional truth as it is understood in the Madhyamaka tradition deriving from Nagarjuna and Candrakarti

In Moonshadows, the Cowherds, a team of ten scholars of Buddhist Studies, address the nature of conventional truth as it is understood in the Madhyamaka tradition deriving from Nagarjuna and Candrakarti. Moonshadows combines textual scholarship with philosophical analysis to elucidate the metaphysical, epistemological and ethical consequences of this doctrine.

The present book is co-authored by a group of scholars, many of them well-known and well-regarded experts in Buddhist and western thought, who call themselves ‘The Cowherds

The present book is co-authored by a group of scholars, many of them well-known and well-regarded experts in Buddhist and western thought, who call themselves ‘The Cowherds. This playful name is taken from a famous statement against speculative philosophical analysis made by the seventh-century Indian Madhyamaka philosopher Candrakīrti, who believed that one should refrain from attempting to prove any more about reality than what is known by ‘cowherds’-by which Candrakīrti means ‘the man on the street.

The doctrine of the two truths--a conventional truth and an ultimate truth--is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools and is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. The fundamental ideas are articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd--3rd century CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another, and yet distinct. One of the most influential interpretations of Nagarjuna's difficult doctrine derives from the commentary of Candrakirti (6th century CE). While much attention has been devoted to explaining the nature of the ultimate truth in view of its special soteriological role, less has been paid to understanding the nature of conventional truth, which is often described as "deceptive," "illusion," or "truth for fools." But conventional truth is nonetheless truth. This book therefore asks, "what is true about conventional truth?" and "What are the implications of an understanding of conventional truth for our lives?"
  • Mariwyn
Good way to enter into the concepts of the two truths and the different slants given by various Mahayana philosophers.
  • Cashoutmaster
This eponymous collection is a collection by big names (Garfield, Tillemans, Newland) and younger colleagues (Takchoe, Westerhoff, etc) on the nature and importance of conventional truth in Nagarjuna studies specifically following Candrakirti's exegesis. This is an important contribution in that it highlights the practical relevance of Madhyamaka study for everyday transactions with conventional reality. A couple of chapters veer into territory mostly aimed at high level philosophy students, but most have an eye to the knowledgeable student of Buddhist studies. If you know the work of Nagarjuna, Candrakirti and Tsongkhapa, then do not miss this volume, for it unpacks with clarity some of the central issues that have concerned the great minds of Indian and Tibetan Buddhism since Nagarjuna's foundational text.