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Download Behind the G-String: An Exploration of the Stripper's Image, Her Person and Her Meaning eBook

by David A. Scott

Download Behind the G-String: An Exploration of the Stripper's Image, Her Person and Her Meaning eBook
ISBN:
0786402628
Author:
David A. Scott
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
McFarland Publishing (October 1, 1996)
Pages:
262 pages
EPUB book:
1516 kb
FB2 book:
1190 kb
DJVU:
1900 kb
Other formats
lit rtf doc mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
382


Behind the G-String book. Few became strippers by design but a surprising number continue to strip for many years. The use of drugs and instances of abuse are covered, as are the views of the strippers families.

Behind the G-String book.

Scott, David Alexander. u'1': u'Stripteasers - Interviews', u'0': u'Stripteasers', u'2': u'Burlesque (Theater)', u'5': u'Striptease'}, Stripteasers, Stripteasers - Interviews, Burlesque (Theater), Striptease. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station01. cebu on January 10, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Behind the G-String: An Exploration of the Stripper's Image, Her Person and Her Meaning. by. David Alexander Scott. In recent years, the number of strip clubs in the United States has increased dramatically. Dressed up with terms such as gentlemens clubs, they often feature valet parking, limousines, executive dining rooms, extravagant menus-and, of course, topless or nude women dancing on stage.

This book was supposed to be a book-length study designed to explore the stripper's "image, her person, and her .

This book was supposed to be a book-length study designed to explore the stripper's "image, her person, and her meaning".

The use of drugs and instances of abuse are covered, as are the views of the strippers' families. Format Paperback 262 pages. Dimensions 15. 1 x 22. 8 x 1. 2mm 37. 5g. Publication date 31 May 2004. Publisher McFarland & Co Inc.

Scott, David A. (1996). Behind the G-String: An Exploration of the Stripper’s Image, Her Person and Her Meaning. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and C. Inc. Google Scholar. Sweet, Nova and Richard Tewksbury. What’s a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This?’: Pathways to a Career in Stripping. Sociological Spectrum, 20(3): 325–344.

This book was supposed to be a book-length study designed to explore the stripper's "image, her person, and her meaning"

This book was supposed to be a book-length study designed to explore the stripper's "image, her person, and her meaning". In the first half of the book, the author explores the dancers' working conditions, the pros and cons of being an exotic dancer. In the second half of the book, the author decides how and why the dancer has become mythologized by men in today's day and age.

David Alexander Scott. Dressed up with terms such as "gentlemen's clubs," they often feature valet parking, limousines, executive dining rooms, extravagant menus-and, of course, topless or nude women dancing on stage. Stripping has become a big business, with over . million people, primarily men, attending clubs each week. But what about the women who perform in the clubs? Why do they do it? What is their perception of their job?

Scott, David A. ISBN 13: 9780786402625.

Behind the g-string: an exploration of the stripper's image, her person and her meaning. Scott, David A. McFarland, 2004. Biracial women in therapy: between the rock of gender and the hard place of race. Gillem, Angela . and Thompson, Cathy A. Haworth, 2004. Black professional women in recent american fiction. Marshall, Carmen Rose. Breaking out of the pink-collar ghetto: policy solutions for non-college women. Mastracci, Sharon H. . Buber & feminist ethics: the priority of the personal. Walters, James W. Martin.

In recent years, the number of strip clubs in the United States has increased dramatically. Dressed up with terms such as "gentlemen's clubs," they often feature valet parking, limousines, executive dining rooms, extravagant menus-and, of course, topless or nude women dancing on stage. Stripping has become a big business, with over 3.5 million people, primarily men, attending clubs each week. But what about the women who perform in the clubs? Why do they do it? What is their perception of their job? Numerous interviews with working strippers accompany extensive research in the literature: Some strippers see stripping as simply a job, others view it with a degree of embarrassment, while many see it as an opportunity for empowerment. Few became strippers by design but a surprising number continue to strip for many years. The use of drugs and instances of abuse are covered, as are the views of the strippers' families.
  • Tat
Well, I'm the author, so.....
  • Beazerdred
This book is too expensive for the contents. The book covers why women strip in clubs, then it goes on through many chapters of explanations, but in the end it tells us that it's because they make good money and fast. The book goes on to explain a strippers percetion of her job, then it goes on to tell us that strippers go through greatlengths to justify what they do and how they blame society, x-relationships, family and others, but never themselves. The book goes through many interviews, all of which are very much common and related. A good girl strips to finance her education, to support her children after her man leaves her or to support a drug habit. Or the most common, but not admitted, just for the money. This good is well written, but the story about all these stippers are all the same in this book and on every television review or movie. I wish this book would have covered something new, useful or insightful.
  • Tegore
My thoughts are that this book was way over priced for its contents.

The concept of a man trying to write a book discussing anything about the trials and tribulations of women in the Adult Entertainment Industry is tiring and long winded. The interviews are all the same. You could save yourself the time, spend the same money in a club and interview the dancers yourself. I was recommended to read this book for its historical element in context to pole dancing and burlesque. I found a few funny tidbits of information none of which I believe to be totally factual and not fabricated from the male point of view.

This book was supposed to be a book-length study designed to explore the stripper's "image, her person, and her meaning". In the first half of the book, the author explores the dancers' working conditions, the pros and cons of being an exotic dancer. In the second half of the book, the author decides how and why the dancer has become mythologized by men in today's day and age. The author constructs an extensive binary between the dancer as an ideal, "...ever available, infinitely gratifying, monolithically sexual, and physically ideal..." and as a demon who displays her sexual power only to refuse the men to whom she is this object of display (113-125). The author interviews a small number of dancers for this research of which he never identifies the exact number, and while the first half of the book is fairly inclusive of their thoughts and ideas, the second half is practically devoid of anything except the author's personal theorizing.

In one of his chapters, the author allows the women in his study to describe the benefits of exotic dancing as an occupation. Many of the dancers interviewed report feeling a stronger sense of self; these women have become more sure of themselves as women, and feel that a certain amount of personal growth has occurred as a result of stripping. For many women, a greater sense of satisfaction with their physical bodies is reported, and women also remark on a heightened sense of confidence that pervades their daily lives.

Thus it is evident that many of these women derive a sense of empowerment from being dancers. The following chapter includes a lengthy discussion of the scarring psychological effects of stripping, thus undermining some of these women's statements.
  • komandante
Pornography and adult entertainment has truely grown within the last few years. Everything is pretty much accepted, so it's no surprise that more and more books are being written on topics such as these. My problem with this boko and many like it, is that they're all written along the same lines. There are hundreds of strip-clubs throughout the United States, Mexico and Canada. This book covers interviews with strippers to find out why they strip and how they feel about it. All the answers are the same, too bad. It should cover interviews on the men that visit these clubs. Why do they visit these clubs, what do they think about the strippers, how much are they willing to spend, etc. Since all these stripper books are the same, I was hoping someone would cover interviews with the patrons instead of the stripers. Overall, this book was not worth reading.