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by Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia,Lisa Shapiro,René Descartes

Download The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes (The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe) eBook
ISBN:
0226204413
Author:
Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia,Lisa Shapiro,René Descartes
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; Annotated edition edition (June 1, 2007)
Pages:
280 pages
EPUB book:
1265 kb
FB2 book:
1494 kb
DJVU:
1411 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
147


Series: The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. It is a highly interesting correspondence with a relaxed Descartes that reveals his philosophical thoughts to the intelligent and quizzical princess.

Series: The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe.

The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe Series: Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and René Descartes (1596–1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters-thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth.

Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and Ren? .

Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and Ren? Descartes (1596–1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters-thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth. Their correspondence contains the only known extant philosophical writings by Elisabeth, revealing her mastery of metaphysics, analytic geometry, and moral philosophy, as well as her keen interest in natural philosophy.

The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and Rene Desc. The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and Rene Desc. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Correspondence, Modern Philosophy.

Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and René Descartes (1596–1650) exchanged .

Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and René Descartes (1596–1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters-thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth.

René Descartes and Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia. Titles and other honorics are omitted; and Descartes will be made to use ‘you’ and ‘your’ where in fact he always used ‘your Highness’ and ‘she’ and ‘her’.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. During the years between 1643 and 1649, princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618-80) and René Descartes (1596-1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters: thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth. By her own directive, Elisabeth's letters were not published.

Elisabeth of the Palatinate (26 December 1618 – 11 February 1680), also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate, or Princess-Abbess of Herford Abbey, was the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (who was briefl.

Elisabeth of the Palatinate (26 December 1618 – 11 February 1680), also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate, or Princess-Abbess of Herford Abbey, was the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (who was briefly King of Bohemia), and Elizabeth Stuart. Elisabeth of the Palatinate is a philosopher best known for her correspondence with René Descartes.

Other voice in early modern Europe. Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618-80) and Rene Descartes (1596-1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters - thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth. Their correspondence contains the only known extant philosophical writings by Elisabeth and reveals her mastery of metaphysics, analytic geometry, and moral philosophy, as well as her keen interest in natural philosophy.

Between the years 1643 and 1649, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–80) and René Descartes (1596–1650) exchanged fifty-eight letters—thirty-two from Descartes and twenty-six from Elisabeth. Their correspondence contains the only known extant philosophical writings by Elisabeth, revealing her mastery of metaphysics, analytic geometry, and moral philosophy, as well as her keen interest in natural philosophy. The letters are essential reading for anyone interested in Descartes’s philosophy, in particular his account of the human being as a union of mind and body, as well as his ethics. They also provide a unique insight into the character of their authors and the way ideas develop through intellectual collaboration.Philosophers have long been familiar with Descartes’s side of the correspondence. Now Elisabeth’s letters—never before available in translation in their entirety—emerge this volume, adding much-needed context and depth both to Descartes’s ideas and the legacy of the princess. Lisa Shapiro’s annotated edition—which also includes Elisabeth’s correspondence with the Quakers William Penn and Robert Barclay—will be heralded by students of philosophy, feminist theorists, and historians of the early modern period.