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Download A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage eBook

by Abdellah Hammoudi

Download A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage eBook
ISBN:
0745637884
Author:
Abdellah Hammoudi
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Polity; 1 edition (January 24, 2006)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1957 kb
FB2 book:
1352 kb
DJVU:
1510 kb
Other formats
rtf docx mbr lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
224


Any pilgrim has a journey unlike any other pilgrim, but Hammoudi's effort, chronicled in A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage (Hill and Wang) is distinct. He is not a believer like his other fellow pilgrims, even the friends he goes with

Any pilgrim has a journey unlike any other pilgrim, but Hammoudi's effort, chronicled in A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage (Hill and Wang) is distinct. He is not a believer like his other fellow pilgrims, even the friends he goes with. I am not contemptuous of religions; I believe that under certain conditions they allow for expression of major existential dilemmas and encourage reconciliation on a grand scale.

A Season in Mecca book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Moroccan scholar Abdellah Hammoudi takes a pilgrimage to Mecca to observe the Hajj as an anthropologist and as an ordinary pilgrim, and to write about it for both Muslims and non-Muslims. An unforgettable report on one man's hajj-the sacred rite that brings millions of Muslims to Mecca every year In 1999, the Moroccan scholar Abdellah Hammoudi, trained in Paris and teaching in America, decided to go on the pilgrimage to Mecca

In 1999, the Moroccan scholar Abdellah Hammoudi, trained in Paris and teaching in America, decided to go on the pilgrimage to Mecca. He wanted to observe the hajj as an anthropologist but also to experience it as an ordinary pilgrim, and to write about it for both Muslims and non-Muslims.

In 1999, the Moroccan scholar Abdellah Hammoudi, trained in Paris and teaching in America, decided to go on the pilgrimage to Mecca.

A Unique View of the Pilgrimage.

book by Abdellah Hammoudi. A Unique View of the Pilgrimage.

A SEASON IN MECCA: NARRATIVE OF A PILGRIMAGE By Abdellah Hammoudi . His moving and at times painful book has a dual purpose.

A massive bureaucracy governs every stage of the intricate process. Abdellah Hammoudi, a Moroccan Muslim and a professor of anthropology at Princeton, faced a far tougher obstacle: He was a wavering believer. Unlike Vatican City or Bodh Gaya in India, Mecca is not a place that welcomes the merely curious.

Abdellah Hammoudi (born in 1945) is a Moroccan anthropologist, ethnographer, and emeritus professor of anthropology at Princeton University. A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage. Translated by Ghazaleh, Pascale. New York: Hill & Wang. Borneman, John; Hammoudi, Abdellah, eds. (2009). Being there: the fieldwork encounter and the making of truth. Berkeley: University of California Press.

My pilgrimage to Mecca. by. Abdellah Hammoudi. Hammoudi, Abdellah, Muslim pilgrims and pilgrimages - Saudi Arabia - Mecca, Muslim pilgrims and pilgrimages - Morocco. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 17, 2013.

Muslims from the Malay Archipelago, they were travelling to Mecca and Medina for the pilgrimage. Some came from the Netherlands East Indies (now Indonesia); some from the different Malay states, then beginning to experience more direct British intervention; some from Singapore. The ship was under the British flag.

Moroccan scholar Abdellah Hammoudi takes a pilgrimage to Mecca to observe the Hajj as an anthropologist and as an. . Farrar Straus Giroux.

In 1999, the Moroccan scholar Abdellah Hammoudi, trained in Parisand teaching in America, decided to go on the pilgrimage to Mecca.He wanted to observe the hajj as an anthropologist but also toexperience it as an ordinary pilgrim, and to write about it forboth Muslims and non-Muslims. Here is his intimate, intense, anddetailed account of the hajj - a rare and important document by asubtle, learned, and sympathetic writer. Hammoudi describes not just the adventure, the human pressures, andthe social tumult - everything from the early preparations to thelast climactic scenes in the holy shrines of Medina and Mecca - butalso the intricate politics and amazing complexity of the entirepilgrimage experience. He pays special heed to the effects of Saudibureaucratic control over the hajj, to the ways that faith itselfbecomes a lucrative source of commerce for the Arabian kingdom, andto the Wahhabi inflections of the basic Muslim message.Here, too, is a poignant discussion of the inner voyage thatpilgrimage can mean to those who embark on it: the transformedsense of daily life, of worship, and of political engagement.Hammoudi acknowledges that he was spurred to reconsider his ownideas about faith, gesture, community, and nationality inunanticipated ways. This is a remarkable work of literature aboutboth the outer forms and the inner meanings of Islam today.
  • Ielonere
Some people might find this book to be interesting, but I found it to be horribly dull and had a hard time getting through it. He drones on and on about his inner struggle in going on the Hajj while being a (somewhat unbelieving) anthropologist and I found it to be redundant. I learned some interesting things about the pilgrimage through this book, but I think a lot of the theory was lost on me because I don't have much of a background in it--I would have much rather enjoyed a book which was less him and more experience. It might just have been that I found him to be annoying.
  • Tejar
good
  • Gela
Vague
  • Jay
I'm writing this review knowing that I'm not going to do the book justice. The number one reason is that I'm far too removed from academia now and far too pressed for time to be able to follow closely and read and reread each passage. The second reason is that I read the first 141 pages more than a year before finishing the rest of the book.

When I started reading the book, I was turned off by what I saw as the author's complaining about the endemic corruption of the developing world, similar to the WAWA (West Africa Wins Again) of U.S. travelogs in west Africa. The author's mentioning his disregard for ritual requirements and prohibitions and his lack of reverence for the blessing of Allah's invitation to His house pained me. And I just stopped reading the book.

But from page 142 on, and I don't know if I'm imagining it, it was as if I was reading a totally different book. The participation in the rituals of ziyara, umra and hajj, no matter how "defective" the author's intention, changed the tone of the narrative. It was as if the magnitude of the crowds, the power of the stories the rituals reenacted, the landscape, the buildings, the sounds and the words of the Quran flooded over the dam of the author's preconceived research plan. But this flood was not destructive. Rather, the water initiated the germination of the seeds of Muslim identity lying in a soil enriched, not polluted, by the European-American discipline of anthropology.

Now I may still be on a post Eid al-Fitr high, and I have to say just thinking about Makka is enough to make me cry (even this instant!)-May Allah azza wa jall invite us all there!-but I thought this author made me as a Muslim think about the hajj in ways I had not considered. And is there worship better than pondering Allah's signs in His messengers and His judgments?

For the non-Muslim reader, I hope that the latter half of the book will bring attention to Islam as a religion rather than as a political movement.

This book has by far the best description of the replacement and sacrifice of Ibrahim, Hajar and Ismail alayhim assalaam that I've read. In my brief Internet search, I came across a good article by Carol Delaney's Was Abraham Ethical? Should We Admire His Willingness to Sacrifice His Son? But Professor's Abdellah's discussion is at a whole other level.

The book reminds me a lot of the only other "deep" anthropology book I've ever read, Paths Toward a Clearing by Michael Jackson. I have to read these kinds of books repeatedly to find their rhythm. If you have the time, it's well worth it.
  • Xinetan
The description of navigating the Moroccan kleptocracy to get one of the visas alloted to the county is an example of Hammoudi's excellent narrative capability. Other highlights are his descriptions of the intimidating preparatory classes, the shopping sprees, an animal sacrifice, the oversold busses with the blaring religious tapes, the people he meets, the failings of tour operators and the pilgrims' reactions to them and the petty bureaucracy he encountered upon trying to leave Saudi Arabia.

Not all the descriptions, though, are up to this level. For instance, I couldn't envision the run between Safi and Marwa, including the "gallery" over the path. (bleachers for watching? a place with religious art?) Are there hundreds bunched the way marathons start, or in small clusters? What of the woman who cuts the lock of his hair afterward? (Can anyone just reach out and cut anyone's hair or is it arranged?) I didn't fully understand the lodgings (esp. with his gender mixed group). He does mention an air conditioned tent, but what of the other places? Motels? Temporary trailers? How did they (the women, that is) cook in them (stoves? bunsen burners?) and what of these rest rooms (down the hall? 1 for X number people? showers?) that they lined up to use?

Hammoudi is sensitive to the very second class status of women. They have all the same religious obligations as the men and have to cook too. They pray in a padlocked area. Some of the instances beg for more. For instance, he says some the women were sick because of the pills they had taken to stop menstruating (they did not want to be unclean in holy places). This is all that is written on this.

The major shortcoming, however, is Hammoudi's tendency to over-intellectualize. Much of this relates to his feelings of being an outsider. A lot of it I just couldn't follow.

Despite these limitations (and that this Hajj is in 1999), this is an insider's look at the pilgrimage, without any idealization or fluff. Hammoudi calls it as he sees it with refreshing honesty about his beliefs and feelings.
  • Ballalune
A SEASON IN MECCA: NARRATIVE OF A PILGRIMAGE comes from a Muslim writer who is always questioning his religion's fundamentals - but not its meaning. His survey of how his fellow Muslim make the pilgrimage to Mecca, and why, gets him on the road of pilgrims, to personally investigate the different worlds of Islam and the varied reasons pilgrims have for making the sacred journey. Moroccan scholar Hammoudi's own pilgrimage to Mecca describes its history, religious importance, and social effects alike, as well as the politics which influence the pilgrimage itself. A 'must' for any who would understand modern Muslim sentiments.
  • Kulabandis
Thought the book was supposed to be about the pilgrimage....not every single, detailed, over-analyzed thought that crossed this man's mind, most of which hinted at deep dissatisfaction. Evidently, he did not want to go on the Hajj, but preferred to write a book complaining about it