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Download Herculean Ferrara: Ercole d'Este (1471-1505) and the Invention of a Ducal Capital (Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture) eBook

by Thomas Tuohy

Download Herculean Ferrara: Ercole d'Este (1471-1505) and the Invention of a Ducal Capital (Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture) eBook
ISBN:
0521464714
Author:
Thomas Tuohy
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; Annotated edition edition (June 13, 1996)
Pages:
566 pages
EPUB book:
1518 kb
FB2 book:
1534 kb
DJVU:
1294 kb
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Rating:
4.2
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472


Ercole I d'Este, KG (26 October 1431 – 25 January 1505) was Duke of Ferrara from 1471 until 1505. He was a member of the House of Este. He was nicknamed North Wind and The Diamond.

Ercole I d'Este, KG (26 October 1431 – 25 January 1505) was Duke of Ferrara from 1471 until 1505. Ercole was born in 1431 in Ferrara to Nicolò III and Ricciarda da Saluzzo. His maternal grandparents were Thomas III of Saluzzo and Marguerite of Roussy.

The court of Ercole d'Este was one of the most glittering in Renaissance Italy. The duke was a prolific builder, and the leader in the revival of classical theatre, an enthusiastic patron of musicians, and a creator of magnificent court spectacles

The court of Ercole d'Este was one of the most glittering in Renaissance Italy. The duke was a prolific builder, and the leader in the revival of classical theatre, an enthusiastic patron of musicians, and a creator of magnificent court spectacles.

Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Charles M. Rosenberg (a1). University of Notre Dame. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 20 November 2018.

Herculean Ferrara book. No trivia or quizzes yet. Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture (1 - 10 of 24 books).

Numbers and Nationhood: Writing Statistics in Nineteenth-Century Italy.

Ercole d'Este (1471-1505) is perhaps best known as the father of Isabella d'Este, marchioness of Mantua, but his court in Ferrara was one of the most glittering in Renaissance Italy. He was also the leader in the revival of classical theatre, an enthusiastic patron of musicians, and a creator of magnificent court spectacles.

Ferrara: The Style of a Renaissance Despotism. Werner L. Gundersheimer. James Bruce Ross - 1975 - Speculum 50 (4):725-728

Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture. Cambridge, En. Cambridge University Press, 1996. Ferrara: The Style of a Renaissance Despotism. James Bruce Ross - 1975 - Speculum 50 (4):725-728. Spaces for Musical Performance in the Este Court in Ferrara (C. 1440-1540). Laura Moretti - 2012 - In The Music Room in Early Modern France and Italy: Sound, Space and Object. pp. 213. Abel Ferrara. Nicole Brenez - 2006 - University of Illinois Press.

The Este Monuments and Urban Development in Renaissance Ferrara. Rosenberg. Thomas Tuohy," Speculum 73, no. 2 (Ap. 1998): 584-587. Werner Gundersheimer. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction.

Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 56 No. 3, Se. 1997 (pp. 354-356) DOI: 1. 307/991251. Find this author on Google Scholar. This is a PDF-only article. The first page of the PDF of this article appears above.

Queer temporalities have become a significant field of queer studies in recent years, encompassing theories of spectrality, sideways .

Queer temporalities have become a significant field of queer studies in recent years, encompassing theories of spectrality, sideways development, nonteleology, and the death of futurity, among others more. Queer temporalities have become a significant field of queer studies in recent years, encompassing theories of spectrality, sideways development, nonteleology, and the death of futurity, among others. The importance of asynchronicity to queer temporalities is widely acknowledged, if continually debated.

The court of Ercole d'Este was one of the most glittering in Renaissance Italy. The duke was a prolific builder, and the leader in the revival of classical theater, an enthusiastic patron of musicians, and a creator of magnificent court spectacles. Very little survives to testify to Ercole's achievements, largely because of a devastating earthquake in 1570, but extensive archival evidence has been used to reestablish the duke's achievements and the extent to which he was personally involved in his patronage.