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Download Gabriel Garcia Marquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude (Landmarks of World Literature) eBook

by Michael Wood

Download Gabriel Garcia Marquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude (Landmarks of World Literature) eBook
ISBN:
0521316928
Author:
Michael Wood
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (June 29, 1990)
Pages:
132 pages
EPUB book:
1680 kb
FB2 book:
1383 kb
DJVU:
1495 kb
Other formats
lrf lit mobi azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
746


Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations). PDF Drive investigated dozens of problems and listed the biggest global issues facing the world today.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations). 11 MB·463 Downloads·New!. Kırmızı Pazartesi - Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 189 Pages·2000·598 KB·8,329 Downloads·Turkish·New! Kolombiyalı büyük yazar Gabriel García Márquez'in 1981'de yayımlanan yedinci romanı Kırmızı. ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE By Gabriel Garcia Marquez Courtesy. Let's Change The World Together. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927. Gabriel Garcia Marquez was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982. and maria luisa elio. One hundred years of solitude. He studied at the University of Bogota and later worked as a reporter for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador and as a foreign correspondent in Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Caracas and New York. He lives in Mexico City.

Gabriel García Márquez book. Michael Wood places the One Hundred Years of Solitude is perhaps the most important landmark of the so-called Boom in contemporary Latin American fiction. One Hundred Years of Solitude is perhaps the most important. In 1982, its author received the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Gabriel García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude (Landmarks of World Literature). Download (djvu, 530 Kb) Donate Read.

One Hundred Years of Solitude is a landmark 1967 novel by Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that tells the multi-generational story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch, José Arcadio Buendía.

One Hundred Years of Solitude is a landmark 1967 novel by Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that tells the multi-generational story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch, José Arcadio Buendía, founded the town of Macondo, a fictitious town in the country of Colombia

It is typical of Gabriel García Márquez that it will be many pages before his narrative circles back to the ice, and many chapters before . Gabriel García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude (Landmarks of World Literature).

It is typical of Gabriel García Márquez that it will be many pages before his narrative circles back to the ice, and many chapters before the hero of One Hundred Years of Solitude, Buendía, stands before the firing squad.

Series: Landmarks of World Literature. Recommend to librarian. Gabriel García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude. Online ISBN: 9780511620492. Michael Wood places the novel in the context of modern Colombia's violent history, and helps the reader to explore the rich and complex vision of the world which Garcia Marquez presents in it. Close reference is made to the text itself (in English translation), and there is a guide to further reading.

But it was the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez who pushed the Latin American narrative to the forefront of world literature, with the publication of One Hundred Years of Solitude in 1967. It was a masterpiece of magical realism, following the legendary and mythical life-cycle of the town of Macondo and the Buendia family who founded it and lived there. After One Hundred Years of Solitude, further masterpieces punctuated his career, earning him the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982.

One Hundred Years of Solitude is perhaps the most important landmark of the so-called 'Boom' in contemporary Latin American fiction. Published in 1967, the novel was an instant success, running to hundreds of editions, winning four international prizes, and being translated into 27 languages. In 1982, its author received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Michael Wood places the novel in the context of modern Colombia's violent history, and helps the reader to explore the rich and complex vision of the world which Garcia Marquez presents in it. Close reference is made to the text itself (in English translation), and there is a guide to further reading.
  • Ynneig
Bought this book thinking it was the original so called literary masterpiece and one of the greatest works ever written by a Latin American author. What I got instead was an over priced textbook marketed as the genuine item. Very disappointed
  • Zetadda
Not the book
  • Kelerana
This is my third attempt to (re)read the 100 years of solitude. And third time I get some other, than the book, this one for 30 bucks. This is cheating, AMAZON !
  • xander
I paid for this book and then could not download it to my Kindle. I tried to cancel the order but had no way of doing it. So I paid for something that I couldn't use. I would really like a refund on this.
  • Anyshoun
Well written, full of colorful visions. But even more thought provoking than visually imaginative.
Not at all what I expected....not sure what I expected :)
  • Samulkree
I almost gave up on this book after the first couple of chapters. They were not bad, I just was not blown away with the insights that Michael Wood had to offer, and I have found that I have to be very careful about how I spend my time and energy. There are so many excellent books to read there is really no point wasting time and energy on something that you are not really excited about. I decided, however, to stick with this book, and I am glad I did.

It turns out that Michael Wood has a lot of very interesting things to say, and some really interesting insights into One Hundred Years of Solitude (P.S.) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The book is short and can be read in a few sittings, so it does not require a huge investment of time or energy, but Wood manages in a very short space to say some very interesting things about the themes of One Hundred Years of Solitude, the meaning of its 'magical realism', its tone, its narrative structure, and much more. One Hundred Years of Solitude is a very interesting book, and is, as I have learned, full of riches; but those riches are not always immediately evident on a first read through. At least they were not immediately evident to me.

There are some books I read that I feel like I "get" right away. I have a very clear idea about what the author is trying to do, I fill up the margins with notes, etc.. There are other books that I feel like I "get" to some degree, but I sense that they possess hidden riches that I am not fully grasping. There are a third class of books that I read, and enjoy, but still feel as if I am missing the main point. One Hundred Years of Solitude fell into that last category for me. I enjoyed the book simply as a story. I liked the characters and the setting. I found the magical realism interesting, even beautiful. I realized that Gabriel Garcia Marquez was using some interesting narrative techniques (foreshadowing, flashbacks, non-linearity, etc.), but ultimately I felt like I was missing the main point of the book. I felt like other people were getting more out of it than I was and I really wanted to figure out what I was missing.

So I decided to do a little research. I started out with two collections of essays: 100 Years of Solitude (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations) edited by Harold Bloom, and One Hundred Years of Solitude (Critical Insights) edited by Ilan Stavans. Some of the essays I read in those volumes (I did not read them all) were interesting but I felt like they were mostly geared toward a different audience. They seemed to me to be geared towards people who already had a basic understanding of the book and were interested in pursuing more specialized topics. The authors all seemed to be arguing very narrow theses, which were interesting, but they were not providing me with the basic insight into the book that I wanted. So I decided to give Michael Wood's book a try, and it turned out to be exactly what I was looking for. Michael Wood provides the reader with a basic understanding of the novel which can then lead, if the reader so desires, into the pursuit of more narrow topics. I now feel like I have a basic understanding of what One Hundred Years of Solitude was really about, and it has deepened my appreciation for the novel a great deal.

Before I end this review, I would also like to recommend another collection of essays that I thought were good: Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude: A Casebook (Casebooks in Criticism) edited by Gene H. Bell-Villada. The collection of essays in that volume were more like what I was hoping for in the first two volumes I tried. The essay "Gabriel Garcia Marquez: Cien anos de soledad" by James Higgins was a particularly good introduction to the novel in my opinion. At the very least I would recommend reading it along with Michael Wood's book. Then, if you are inspired, you can read some of the other essays in the book, many of which are also quite good.
  • Cerar
This is a fake book. Amazon, please remove it.
Gabriel Garcia Marquez' One Hundred Years Of Solitude is the literary equivalent of a magic carpet ride, your own magic genii come to life, and Shaharazade's 101 tales wrapped into one brilliant, multilayered epic novel. From page one you will voyage with the most remarkably original cast of characters, through worlds of vibrant color, where the sun shines almost always - when not obscured by a four year downpour. You will find yourself laughing out loud when you are not sobbing in sympathy with someone dying of heartbreak. I do not like to label Sr. Garcia Marquez' work "magical realism." There is no label to accurately describe the writing that gifted us with One Hundred Years Of Solitude. This is a book that defies description. You must read it to experience the fantastically real world of Macondo, and the people who live there. Once you know them, they will be a part of your own world forever. Have you ever looked at a painting, walked into it and become a part of it? When you open this novel at page one, you are beckoned to enter.

Macondo is a mythical South American town, founded, almost by accident, by Jose Arcadio Buendia, and populated primarily by his descendants. This is the story of one hundred years in the life of Macondo and its inhabitants - the story of the town's birth, development and death. Civil war and natural calamities plague this vital place whose populace fights to renew itself and survive. This is a huge narrative fiction that explores the history of a people caught up in the history of a place. And Marquez captures the range of human emotions and the reasons for experiencing them in this generational tale.

There is much that is delightful and comical here. Surprises never cease, whether it be Remedios ascending, or a man whose presence is announced by clouds of butterflies. There is satire, sexuality and bawdiness galore. But there is also a pervading sadness and futility that permeates throughout. Cruelty is a reality in Marquez' world, as are failure, despair and senseless, sudden violence. The plot is filled with passion, poetry, romance, tragedy and the echoes of the history of Colombia and Latin America.

I first read One Hundred Years Of Solitude in 1968, while living in Latin America. I have read it 2 or 3 times over the years, always picking up new pieces of wonder that I had previously missed. This is my favorite novel, and I am an avid reader. My favorite fictional character is Melquiades, the gypsy who foretells the future of the township and whose ghost accompanies the reader until there is no more to read. Having read this in Spanish and English, I must laud Gregory Rabassa's extraordinary translation which faithfully brings to life not only Marquez' story, but his lyrical prose. This is one of the 20th Century's best works of fiction. It is a masterpiece not to be missed.
JANA