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Download The Rousing Drum: Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community eBook

by Scott Schnell

Download The Rousing Drum: Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community eBook
ISBN:
0824821416
Author:
Scott Schnell
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Hawaii Press; 1st Paperback Edition edition (June 1, 1999)
Pages:
376 pages
EPUB book:
1623 kb
FB2 book:
1835 kb
DJVU:
1908 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
418


The Rousing Drum takes a different view In analyzing the festival over time, Schnell reveals a dramatic transformation.

The Rousing Drum takes a different view. It adopts a historical perspective encompassing several hundred years in exploring the role of ritual as an effective medium for negotiating sociopolitical and economic change. The setting is Furukawa, a town located in Japan's mountainous interior. Every spring the local Shinto shrine festival provides an opportunity for enacting social relationships and attitudes. In analyzing the festival over time, Schnell reveals a dramatic transformation. The drum ritual, which originated as a minor preliminary to the other events, emerged during the late 1800s as an occasion for airing hostilities and settling scores.

Southeast Asia has been an important testing ground for postwar Japanese foreign policy. It was in Southeast Asia that the United States first pressed Japan to emerge from defeat and isolation after the war by providing reparations to help buttress the region against the threat of communism

Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. As part of the successful International Library of Policy Analysis series, the book provides expert analysis to closely examine to what extent the Japanese government has succeeded in providing key policy actors with. evidence-informed policy optioms, thereby improving the likelyhyood of better policies being adoped and implemented. it also asseses Japan's future policy directions.

Book Description: Ritual is too often equated with unvarying or repetitive behavior. The Rousing Drum takes a different view

Published by: University of Hawai'i Press. Book Description: Ritual is too often equated with unvarying or repetitive behavior. This impression is encouraged by the ethnographic tendency toward an overly narrow time frame, which highlights current relationships and conditions rather than long-term developments. The Rousing Drum takes a different view.

The Rousing Drum takes a different view In analyzing the festival over time, Schnell reveals a dramatic transformation.

Scott Schnell - 2006 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33 (1):178-181. Paul Swanson - 1997 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 24 (1-2):215-216. Wendell Minnick - 1990 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (1):92-94.

Duteil-Ogata, Fabienne. Scott Schnell, The Rousing Drum-Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community. Honolulu, University of Hawaï Press, 1999, 363 p. (bibliogr. , Archives de sciences sociales des religions, vol. no 120, no. 4, 2002, pp. 84-84. APA. Duteil-Ogata, F. (2002). Scott Schnell, The Rousing Drum-Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community: Honolulu, University of Hawaï Press, 1999, 363 p. Archives de sciences sociales des religions, no 120,(4), 84-84.

Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1999. ix. 363 p. maps, photographs, notes, bibliography, index. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1999.

Japanese folklore encompasses the informally learned folk traditions of Japan and the Japanese people as expressed in its oral traditions . Schnelle, Scott (1999). The Rousing Drum: Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community. University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-2141-8.

Japanese folklore encompasses the informally learned folk traditions of Japan and the Japanese people as expressed in its oral traditions, customs, and material culture. In Japanese, the term minkan denshō (民間伝承, "transmissions among the folk") is used to describe folklore. The academic study of folklore is known as minzokugaku (民俗学). Folklorists also employ the term minzoku shiryō (民俗資料) or "folklore material" (民俗資料) to refer to the objects and arts they study.

This culminated in a book entitledThe Rousing Drum: Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community(University of Hawai‘i Press, 1999), which explores the use of ritual as a forum for negotiating sociopolitical and economic change.

Ritual is too often equated with unvarying or repetitive behavior. This impression is encouraged by the ethnographic tendency toward an overly narrow time frame, which highlights current relationships and conditions rather than long-term developments.

The Rousing Drum takes a different view. It adopts a historical perspective encompassing several hundred years in exploring the role of ritual as an effective medium for negotiating sociopolitical and economic change.

The setting is Furukawa, a town located in Japan's mountainous interior. Every spring the local Shinto shrine festival provides an opportunity for enacting social relationships and attitudes. By day, a portable shrine containing the spirit of the guardian deity is escorted through town in a stately procession. At night, however, a different scenario unfolds. A barrel-shaped drum is borne through the nighttime streets on a massive grid-like platform. Prominent members of the community are obliged to ride upon the platform, while teams of young adults rush out and attack it as it passes through their respective neighborhoods. The action can become quite unruly, and random fights and injuries are accepted as inevitable correlates.

In analyzing the festival over time, Schnell reveals a dramatic transformation. The drum ritual, which originated as a minor preliminary to the other events, emerged during the late 1800s as an occasion for airing hostilities and settling scores. As Japan's modernization progressed, the ritual performance came to embody a symbolic challenge to institutionalized authority, and occasionally escalated into politically motivated violence. While the religious ceremonies observed during the day were appropriated by local power holders, the nighttime drum ritual represented a folk response to the officially sanctioned liturgy. The festival as a whole thus represented the clash of competing ideologies within the context of a single public forum. Today's ritual, rather tame by comparison, is being transformed into a tourist attraction aligned with the town's economic development objectives.

Schnell's careful examination of the ethnohistorical data offers a valuable new perspective on Japanese festivals as well as the events and conditions that influence their development. His innovative look at ritual behavior over time persuades us that we can grasp the underlying significance of such activities only if we consider them within the context of larger historical patterns.